Confederate soldiers on march

dvrmte

Major
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Location
South Carolina
Well Pard. The sign is wrong. The claim that it was 1862, was disproved about ten years ago. The photographer wasn't there in 1862.

I thought I read of a disagreement a good while back. They argued that it was Early's men in the 64 campaign. Now I'm going to have to look it up.
 

prroh

Captain
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Location
Maryland
I thought I read of a disagreement a good while back. They argued that it was Early's men in the 64 campaign. Now I'm going to have to look it up.

That is what I understand as well. Early in '64
 

Claude Bauer

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Well Pard. The sign is wrong. The claim that it was 1862, was disproved about ten years ago. The photographer wasn't there in 1862.

I've heard that one author, William Frassanito, disputed the date in one of his books on Civil War photos, but I've never seen any definitive evidence on that. Can you point me to some research? If there is some compelling evidence on that point, I'd certainly consider it--this is one of the most famous photos of the war. In fact, reenactors are planning on restaging this photo this coming Sept. as a Sesquicentennial event. It would be a shame if we had the date wrong! Thanks.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
I found this "Confederate Soldiers Marching 1863 Authentic American Civil War Footage" at

It is suppose to be authentic American Civil War footage shot by French experimental photographer and inventor Leon-Alexander Canular (1810-1896) using a single lens camera that he had devised, It is one of the earlest examples of motion picture and the first with war as the subject matter. Shot at 16-18 frames per second, only photographic copies of parts of the paper filmstrip exist today.

The subject matter is thought to be The Army of Northern Virginia advancing through Maryland prior to the Battle of Gettysburg. This footage was preserved by the National Film Registry in 1991 for being "a historically significant film". It was uploaded by OnlyJasonere on Jan. 2, 2010.
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
I did some more research on this footage, in my previous post. There are several who say it is a hoax. I tried to find a photographer by the name, Leon-Alexander Canular and can only find reference to this footage and that it is an hoax. do any of you know anything about this? Thanks.
 

Republican Blues

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 13, 2010
Location
on the Savannah Station..
Uhm, video was not available, but if this is the one I think it is, its as phony as a three dollar bill. I have seen a video similarly labeled, and watched and was amazed to see footage from the 145th Reenactment. If you have downloaded and saved the video and can watch it, on the other side of the trees, on the left, is Confederate Parking. From the vantage point of the camera, if you did a 180, you would see an artillery camp, and about 1oo to 200 yds beyond that, our camp. This is as fake as the day is long

What is more, the person who posted this deletes and now will not allow any posts on his YouTube page other than those praising him for his find and giving positive reviews. It is a FAKE
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Thanks for post. I thought it had to be a fake. What extremes people will go to. I couldn't get it to play as I don't really know how to load a video. All I had done is put the site reference in my post and the video came up and then said no video available. I don't know why that happened.
 

Republican Blues

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 13, 2010
Location
on the Savannah Station..
Your most welcome. If it was tongue in cheek, the video can be forgiven, even laughed at, but its meant to delude people with fake facts, which I find very sad. If this had been real, the media hype about it would have been unreal, and yet I have never heard of it in any press, War of the Rebellion related or not
 

James B White

Captain
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Um, yeah, hoaxes are fun. It's amazing how gullible people are.

The closest that one can get to seeing photographs of people in motion at the time of the war, as far as I know, would be the 1878 images by Eadweard Muybridge. Some of his later images are even sorta ****ographic. "Anatomic studies," y'know. They were series of still photos not meant to be viewed in fast sequence, so people didn't see them in motion at the time, but they've since been put together to give the illusion of movement. Here's the mare "Sallie Gardner," long-dead but come back to life again for us, running on June 19, 1878 in Palo Alto. In the spirit of this post, I don't know who the dude in the saddle was. :smile:

The_Horse_in_Motion-anim.gif


Can anyone think of earlier motion photographs than that? I've seen that series of photos of Grant confering with his officers put in sequence, but they don't really give the illusion of seamless movement.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
That is why all of us (in a general sense) must do our best to cooperate with one another, as to dig through the hoax and the authentic and all things in between.

M. E. Wolf
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
A good site on the development of motion pictures is at EarlyCinema.com

The site is divided into:

1. Timeline, development of this medium from the early 1800s to Thomas Edison and the Lumiere brothers.

2. Pioneers of this medium with profiles of Thomas Edison, William Dickson, Georges Melies, Birt Acres and the Lumiere Brothers.

3. Technology, a look at some of the major inventions in early cinema.

4. Quick reference, an A to Z giving brief information on a wide range of early cinema topics.
 

Claude Bauer

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
There we go. One further thing, you can tell its reenactors by the female Ice Angel walking beside the column.

...and here's where he stole it from: a video of the troops assembling at the Gettysburg reenactment, 2008. The piece he lifted to doctor up for his little hoax starts about at about 125:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=KXGDv5INB-4&NR=1

There was another one going around a few years ago that was supposed be of a skirmish in Florida during the Civil War. I can't find a link to it, but that one was a fake too.
 
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