Confederate privates, Double breasted Frock coat

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Aug 25, 2012
I wonder if some of these might have been civilian attire, with changed buttons and added insignia?
Edward Porter Alexander describes his trip to Washington after Appomattox, wearing "a U. S. Army private's overcoat, only dyed black instead of its original blue." < Gary W. Gallagher, Editor, Fighting for the Confederacy: The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander. (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1989), p. 547.>
If a young family member was going off to war, might a family modify some existing clothes into a uniform?

I do not believe that double-breasted frock coats were common civilian wear at the time. My guess is that because the early war Confederate uniform regulations (General Order No. 9 Uniform and Dress of the Army June 6 1861) proscribed short double-breasted frock coats for enlisted men, that some state units attempted to follow these regulations and adopted double-breasted frock coats.
 

WJC

Major General
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Answered the Call for Reinforcements
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I do not believe that double-breasted frock coats were common civilian wear at the time. My guess is that because the early war Confederate uniform regulations (General Order No. 9 Uniform and Dress of the Army June 6 1861) proscribed short double-breasted frock coats for enlisted men, that some state units attempted to follow these regulations and adopted double-breasted frock coats.
Thanks for your response!
 

Trooper "D"

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May 20, 2018
That would be an interesting subject to study. My first guess without any research would be that some pre-war militia companies favored double-breasted frock coats. So when companies formed in that area double-breasted frock coats were the standard of military elegance and the town wanted to send off well dress soldiers. I would also want to study the connection between the Army's use of double-breasted coatees (tail coats) in the 1830-1850s to see if the concept that well dressed soldiers had two rows of buttons was some how carried over to two rows of buttons on frock coats. A third area of thought is that officers wore two rows of buttons and that elegant dressed enlisted men should too. Do you have any clues as to why these particular companies went with double-breasted frock coats?
I thought that Infantry units generally had single breasted coats and mounted troops had the double breasted ones.
 
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