Restricted Confederate Memorial Nicholasville, Kentucky

Joined
Jan 28, 2021
Confederate Memorial
Nicholasville, Kentucky
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In 1896, former Confederate States of America cavalryman Bennett H Young dedicated this unique seven foot statue of a ‘galvanized Yankee’. In 1997, it was listed as one of sixty-one different monuments related to the Civil War in Kentucky placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Young was a Nicholasville native and had an intriguing Civil War service record. Following hostilities, he fled to Europe and returned to the US in 1868 and became an attorney in Louisville.

In 2021, author Ben Montgomery wrote the book A Shot in the Moonlight: How a Freed Slave and a Confederate Soldier Fought for Justice in the Jim Crow South. His work featured the former Confederate Bennett H. Young. A year before he dedicated the Jessamine County Confederate Memorial, Young represented African American George Dimming in a suit against the KKK for defending his home against the armed mob. Dimming had been arrested for his violent action but after conviction was pardoned by the Kentucky Governor.

He then moved to Indiana but decided to file suit against the men that had attacked him. Bennett won the case and Dimming was awarded $50,000. In a June 10, 2020 article for the Kaintuckeean, Peter Brackney, said this about Dimming’s advocate, “Though he wrote a definitive history of the county, his own past indentified him as one who fought against the United States during the Civil War. By glorifying a ‘Lost Cause,’ he was part of the effort to rewrite history.”

Bennett was the author of at least eight books during his lifetime and was one of four keynote speakers, along with President Woodrow Wilson and Grand Army of the Republic Commander–in-Chief Washington Gardner, at the dedication of the Confederate Monument at Arlington National Cemetery. This monument had its beginnings in 1898, when then US President William McKinley, a Civil War Union veteran, proposed, ‘in the spirit of fraternity we should share with you in care of the graves of Confederate Soldiers’. The monument was carved by former Confederate soldier Moses Ezekiel, a Jewish man and dedicated in 1914.

On February 17, 2021, Fred Petke of The Jessamine Journal wrote a column about the Confederate monument Bennett Young dedicated in Nicholasville in 1896. Petke wrote in part referring to the war memorial, “The cause for which the Old South committed treason and tore the country apart in bloody strife was the preservation of slavery.” Jessamine County Judge Executive David West is quoted in the article as saying, “Let’s take the Confederacy off of it.”

As a response to Brackney’s June, 2020, article, Diana Maldonado responded online to the Kaintuckeean website by writing, “I am opposed to removing statues for politically correct reasons or otherwise. The presence of historical statues has not in the least bit hindered the racial progress achieved in this country …I’ll warrant the majority of JC [Jessamine County] citizens were unaware of who the statue represented, other than brave soldiers who gave their lives for a cause, right or wrong. One could make the argument that soldiers fighting for any cause, even keeping our freedom, were on the wrong side because war is abhorrent.”

Linda Blackford writing for the Lexington Herald Leader on December 17, 2020, said this about the Jessamine County shrine, “Like most Confederate monuments, the statue was Southern propaganda.”
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Here's the Feb 17 2021 article, I believe, although the name of the writer is different. He suggests altering the statue rather than removing it.


"A better solution would be to change the statue back to what it was — a Union soldier — by removing the CSA insignia. Also remove the words of tribute to the Lost Cause and put up a historic marker explaining the history of the statue and of Jessamine County’s divided loyalties during the Civil War."​
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Here's the Lexington Herald Leader article. The writer notes that Kentucky was not a Confederate state, and contributed probably as many union as confederate soldiers to the war, and describes the lynching of a black man near the monument in 1902. The writer believes the monument should be relocated.

 
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DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Why is this so important to people here who don’t live in Kentucky?
Why do people express an opinion on any monument if they don't live in that city? There's a thread here about monuments in the North that is mostly commented on by people who don't live in the north.
 

atlantis

Sergeant Major
Joined
Nov 12, 2016
It is up to the locals, the thing about these monument disputes across the nation is decisions are made without a full accounting of the actual historical record behind the monuments in question. Instead we have politicians and media hacks competing who can inflame the public the most. I am sick of this divide and conquer approach to public policy.
 

RobertP

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Location
Dallas
Why do people express an opinion on any monument if they don't live in that city? There's a thread here about monuments in the North that is mostly commented on by people who don't live in the north.
I don’t know, man. Whenever a monument is damaged or removed the usuals’ position here is that it’s up to the locals to make that decision. I guess that only applies if the locals decision agrees with what you want them to do. I get it now.
 

PapaReb

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Location
Arkansas CSA occupied
I don’t know, man. Whenever a monument is damaged or removed the usuals’ position here is that it’s up to the locals to make that decision. I guess that only applies if the locals decision agrees with what you want them to do. I get it now.
On the contrary. The true will of the majority is the action that should be taken, whether I agree with it or not. The issue is that few(if any) of these decisions have been put to a vote of the citizens of the communities.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
I don’t know, man. Whenever a monument is damaged or removed the usuals’ position here is that it’s up to the locals to make that decision. I guess that only applies if the locals decision agrees with what you want them to do. I get it now.
Absolutely agree. Let the locals decide.
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2021
As long as the local know all the facts.
These detractors reference Bennett Young as a reason to remove or alter this monument. They make a case that he was 'bad'. But, as noted in the article he represented a Black in a lawsuit against the KKK. Maybe we was not as 'bad' as the reporters and local officials purposefully attempt to make him. What other so called 'bad' things are not as they appear for this or any other American History monument?
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
As long as the local know all the facts.
These detractors reference Bennett Young as a reason to remove or alter this monument. They make a case that he was 'bad'. But, as noted in the article he represented a Black in a lawsuit against the KKK. Maybe we was not as 'bad' as the reporters and local officials purposefully attempt to make him. What other so called 'bad' things are not as they appear for this or any other American History monument?
I'd guess the opposition has less to do with Bennett Young, and more to do with the Confederacy itself.
 
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