Confederate Memorial Day Is All About The Fallen

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GS

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The way I see memorial days in general is interpreted this way: remembering is honoring and respecting our forefathers.

"Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God gives you." This is one of the BIG TEN commandments, and the only one with a promise built in.

None of us are faultless, and all of our forefathers were flawed to a degree. Do we respect the actions of abusive parents? No but we respect God. It is not suggested that we honor or respect mother and father, but we're commanded to do so.

If one will look hard enough you can find something to honor in the worst of parents, and if not, you honor God, the ultimate parent/Father by being willing to forgive the sinner, as He does.

Remembering the past offers a chance to forgive. Forgiveness is the key to healing, and forgiveness is the balm our nation needs.
 

AshleyMel

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That sounds like a wonderful event @AshleyMel and the wreath is a beautiful tribute.
As does the service in your area!
When the memorial was over, I took some time to walk through the graves and reflect and pay my respects and I had several people come up to me to shake my hand (one kind gentleman even gave me a kiss) and to tell me they were so thankful for us ladies helping to host this event. Many of these men were Veterans themselves and they had tears in their eyes. Some were very elderly and disabled and I think there were two of them that were real grandsons. Grandsons! (We even have real daughters still in the UDC). It really hit home for me! These were real people's lives. And these are real lives today. We should handle with love and care.
 
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bdtex

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@Georgia Sixth Small world sir. I "Followed" you. Maybe we can meet up somewhere some time at a CW function/event. Not sure what part of Texas you reside in.
 
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RobertP

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The way I see memorial days in general is interpreted this way: remembering is honoring and respecting our forefathers.

"Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God gives you." This is one of the BIG TEN commandments, and the only one with a promise built in.

None of us are faultless, and all of our forefathers were flawed to a degree. Do we respect the actions of abusive parents? No but we respect God. It is not suggested that we honor or respect mother and father, but we're commanded to do so.

If one will look hard enough you can find something to honor in the worst of parents, and if not, you honor God, the ultimate parent/Father by being willing to forgive the sinner, as He does.

Remembering the past offers a chance to forgive. Forgiveness is the key to healing, and forgiveness is the balm our nation needs.
I have always liked this quote by David French Boyd, Maj. 9th Louisiana. He was a good friend of Wm. Sherman pre-War (and afterward too) at the Louisiana Military Seminary. After the war he was the first President at LSU, and I believe later at Auburn also.

“He who feels no pride in his ancestors is unworthy
to be remembered by his descendants.”
 

Andersonh1

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The way I see memorial days in general is interpreted this way: remembering is honoring and respecting our forefathers.

"Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God gives you." This is one of the BIG TEN commandments, and the only one with a promise built in.

None of us are faultless, and all of our forefathers were flawed to a degree. Do we respect the actions of abusive parents? No but we respect God. It is not suggested that we honor or respect mother and father, but we're commanded to do so.

If one will look hard enough you can find something to honor in the worst of parents, and if not, you honor God, the ultimate parent/Father by being willing to forgive the sinner, as He does.

Remembering the past offers a chance to forgive. Forgiveness is the key to healing, and forgiveness is the balm our nation needs.
This is a wonderful post.
 

ForeverFree

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Remembering the past offers a chance to forgive. Forgiveness is the key to healing, and forgiveness is the balm our nation needs.
I instinctively understand why people would want to honor their ancestors.

But in another thread, could you talk about how the process of forgiveness works in this case? Who is seeking it, and who is giving it? And, is that actually happening, or is it something we hope would happen?

I do see this day as an obvious opportunity for introspection, but it's not clear as to the outcome of that process.

- Alan
 
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unionblue

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Example? Do you know of any individual or group among those taking part in Confederate memorial services that are celebrating those things?

19thGeorgia,

Yes, there are examples, individuals, and groups that do celebrate the loss of a past they think should have triumphed and no, they are not found in every Confederate Memorial services, but they can sometimes be found in marches, protests, and even heritage websites. I could give you a list, but the news and internet have many example of such, no need to list them here.

My direct ancestor, Jacob Lee Hamilton, served with the 19 Virginia Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg and was captured at The Angle during Pickett's Charge. I have walked the path he took, from the Confederate attack start at the tree line, up to The Angle itself. I have looked back at that path in absolute awe, thinking on the courage and raw guts it took to march, under fire, all that way. And I shake my head in disbelief that he made himself do such. I don't doubt his, or the other Confederate soldiers, bravery, not when you see all that distance they had to cover under the worst of conditions. I am even proud that I may have the blood of such ancestors running through my own veins.

But I will not celebrate his or his comrades cause or give them a special day to remember their participation in that cause. I respect their courage, I visit their final resting places, and give them respect for their courage on the field of battle. I have even been a part of an Honor Guard as Confederate reenactor in such final resting places.

But I choose not to give them a special day because it is not always about the fallen, in my own view. This is my own choice, one that I will not enforce on other who are truly mourning their ancestors.


It's a two-way street.
Is it?

I hope so, I really do.

If we can separate the causes from our memories and bring only dignity, honor, and recognition of courage, to just the fallen on such a day, that would be wonderful.

But to me, such a separation calls upon me personally to forget why these men were called upon to make such heroic sacrifices, and that I just cannot do. My choice.

Others need not agree.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 
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WJC

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There is no good reason to have a Confederate Memorial Day. We already have one Memorial Day for everyone else; either that includes the CSA or they don't get a memorial day at all.

While we're at it we can recognize Native Americans warriors on Memorial Day as well.
The state of Alabama is free to decide what holidays it wants to hold and who it wants to honor.
 
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Bee

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How are the days of observance chosen? Is it because of a significant event in the state regarding the CSA? I am curious as to why the dates vary from state to state (outside of the obvious that each state chooses differently)
 
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Andersonh1

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How are the days of observance chosen? Is it because of a significant event in the state regarding the CSA? I am curious as to why the dates vary from state to state (outside of the obvious that each state chooses differently)
I'm not sure about other states, but I believe South Carolina chose May 10 because it was the date of Stonewall Jackson's death.
 

leftyhunter

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The state of Alabama is free to decide what holidays it wants to hold and who it wants to honor.
Here's the thing; if all men are created equal why is it proper for a governmental authority to honor those who fought to enslave their fellow Alabamians ? Of course private parties can do what they please but doesn't the State of Alabama have a duty to not offend a substantial part of it's population?
How should black children in Al view the honoring of those who fought to enslave their descendants ?
Leftyhunter
 
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lelliott19

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Well, you have to wait till the flowers are blooming!
@Bee I think BlueNGrey may be onto something with the reply above. I think the dates for CMD and decoration days at local cemeteries are selected to coincide with the arrival of warmer weather. Most of the cemeteries in the south are small church cemeteries or similar. In order to get folks out working it had to be pleasant enough to be outdoors and do cemetery "dirty work" of clearing and mowing and the like. Its usually nice enough when the flowers are blooming and they can be used for decoration. Of course, it is possible to use evergreens and whatever happens to be available - such as the lovely wreath in @AshleyMel 's post above.
 
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Here's the thing; if all men are created equal why is it proper for a governmental authority to honor those who fought to enslave their fellow Alabamians ? Of course private parties can do what they please but doesn't the State of Alabama have a duty to not offend a substantial part of it's population?
How should black children in Al view the honoring of those who fought to enslave their descendants ?
Leftyhunter
Through franchisement.
 

bdtex

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CSA Today

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Here's the thing; if all men are created equal why is it proper for a governmental authority to honor those who fought to enslave their fellow Alabamians ? Of course private parties can do what they please but doesn't the
How should black children in Al view the honoring of those who fought to enslave their descendants ?
Leftyhunter
If Alabama, or any other state, avoided offending a substantial part of its population it wouldn't be doing anything at all.
 
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