Confederate dead on J.S.Crawford's farm

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LasPalmas

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I ran across this recently and thought it might of interest to someone

The remains of the following named persons are buried upon my farm. If any of their friends or relatives wish to have anything done with them, they can do by communicating with.

J.S. Crawford,

Gettysburg, Adams county, Pennsylvania



J.W. Snather, or Snathell.

J. Adams, co. A, 13th Miss. Vols.

W.J. Cromer, co. K, 13th Miss.

F. M. Raglin, co. K, 13th Miss. Vols.

N. L. McDuffie, Captain co. F, 18th Miss. Vols.

H. P. Beauchamp, co. E, 18th Miss. Vols.

James Worly, co. F, 21st Miss Vols.

H.L. Terrill, Howitzers.

H.P. Andrew.

Wm. Biggers. Georgia.

N. T. Teader, co. D, 17th Miss. Vols. - His last words were: "A widow – three sweet babes fatherless – mourning - Misirere mei Deus.”

J.W. Carter, Colonel 13th Miss. Vols.

R.G. Gunn, co. A. 17th Miss. Vols.

U. A. Hays, co. K, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.T. Hollowell, co. H, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.W. Davis, co. I, 13th Miss. Vols.

W. B. Connelly, 13th Miss, Vols.

J. C. Rawlson, 13th Miss. Vols.

C. Moore, co. F, 18th Miss. Vols.

H. Brister, co. I, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.W. Brice, co. E, 17th Miss. Vols.

A.P. P… the rest obliterated.

P.A. Robbins, co. C, 17th Miss.

J.W. Fraser

A.C. Reese, co. F, 10th regiment.

Wm. P. Casey.

Wm. Layman, 2nd co. N.A. of N. O.

C.H. Bryen, 3rd co. N.A. of N. O.

P.W. Neil.

Some of the head-boards cannot be deciphered, and many more have none at all.
 
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lelliott19

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I ran across this recently and thought it might of interest to someone

The remains of the following named persons are buried upon my farm. If any of their friends or relatives wish to have anything done with them, they can do by communicating with.

J.S. Crawford,

Gettysburg, Adams county, Pennsylvania
...
Some of the head-boards cannot be deciphered, and many more have none at all.
The names on the list make sense. The Crawford Farm was Barksdale's brigade hospital. Looks like some members of the Washington Artillery were also treated there? I'm assuming that "W. A." for Washington Artillery was mis-transcribed as "N. A." and that "C. H. Bryen" was actually Geo H Bryen? @Tom Elmore
1562810285930.png
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Tom Elmore

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Laura is correct, that's the Washington Artillery of New Orleans (W. A. of N. O.)

A. P. P---- is probably Private Andrew P. Parks, Company C, 17th Mississippi.

J. W. Fraser is likely Captain John Couper Fraser of the Pulaski (Georgia) Artillery in Cabell's artillery battalion.

The body of Col. James W. Carter was said to have been exhumed and embalmed under the direction of Carter's slave, James, who took the remains through Federal lines to Carter's wife in Mississippi. However, Greg Coco in Gettysburg's Confederate Dead shows Carter as having been sent to Hollywood Cemetery in 1872 (as were some of the other dead on Crawford's farm).

The Newton J. Tedder (listed as N. T. Teador) entry is interesting - were his last words carved on his headboard? If so, it would be the only instance that I know of that being done.
 
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Tom Elmore

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Some of the others:

A. C. Reese was undoubtedly Albert Jeremiah Reese, Company F, 10th Georgia.

William P. Casey was with the Brooks (South Carolina) Artillery, led by Lieutenant Stephen C. Gilbert.

P. W. Neil was Patrick McNeil of Captain Parker's Virginia Battery, Alexander's battalion.

William E. Biggers was with the Troup (Georgia) Artillery, led by Captain Carlton, Cabell's battalion.

H. L. Terrill was Henry L. Terrell of the First Richmond Howitzers, led by Captain McCarthy, Cabell's battalion.

Twenty soldiers were disinterred from the Crawford farm on August 3, 1872 in two large boxes marked "C Miss." At that time Tedder's grave was found to be empty. On May 17, 1873, the remains of 22 others were collected from the farm in a box marked "Y." (John W. Busey and Travis W. Busey, Confederate Casualties at Gettysburg)
 
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Tom Elmore

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It just occurred to me that "J. W. Snather, or Snathell" might be Southall. Indeed, a Jeremiah W. Southall of Company K, 10th Georgia was killed during the battle, but neither Coco or the Busey books indicate where he died, so this small mystery may now be solved. It is possible that both Albert J. Reese and Southall were taken from the field in the same ambulance and brought to the field hospital on the Crawford farm. Neither man is identified as having been recovered in 1872/1873, but they probably were, and reinterred at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond as "unknowns." Otherwise they may still lie in the spot where they were initially buried.
 
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LasPalmas

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It just occurred to me that "J. W. Snather, or Snathell" might be Southall. Indeed, a Jeremiah W. Southall of Company K, 10th Georgia was killed during the battle, but neither Coco or the Busey books indicate where he died, so this small mystery may now be solved. It is possible that both Albert J. Reese and Southall were taken from the field in the same ambulance and brought to the field hospital on the Crawford farm. Neither man is identified as having been recovered in 1872/1873, but they probably were, and reinterred at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond as "unknowns." Otherwise they may still lie in the spot were they were initially buried.
Its good to know my post was of interest to some people and may have contributed, even in a really small way, to the body of knowledge about the battle of Gettysburg, and also have shown respect to this nation's fallen soldiers.
A feel good moment. Too few and far between in today's world.
 

Tom Elmore

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Its good to know my post was of interest to some people and may have contributed, even in a really small way, to the body of knowledge about the battle of Gettysburg, and also have shown respect to this nation's fallen soldiers.
A feel good moment. Too few and far between in today's world.
Great work! One can never tell where a bit of information representing a tiny piece of the puzzle (the Gettysburg story) will lead.

Private Jeremiah W. Southall was enrolled on June 14, 1861 at Augusta, Georgia - he was 18 years old. (Compiled Service Records)

Assistant Surgeon James Beverly Clifton of the 53rd Georgia in Semmes’ brigade rode to the Rose farm around midnight on the night of July 2/3, under a bright moon, according to his diary. There he found many untended wounded at the stone barn and immediately went "to work to send them off to the rear" - to a field hospital. Clifton worked until early light on July 3, when an exchange of artillery fire compelled him to depart. We may speculate that Albert J. Reese and Jeremiah W. Southall, also from Semmes' brigade, were two among many whom Dr. Clifton tried to save. Their ambulance traveled west along what we know today as the Wheatfield road, across the ridge where Semmes' brigade had formed and advanced on the late afternoon of July 2. They passed Pitzer's schoolhouse, crossed Willoughby Run, then skirted Marsh Creek. Ahead of them lay the John S. Crawford farm, which was worked by Basil Biggs, a black tenant farmer (Crawford was an attorney; Biggs has his own fascinating story - he was afterwards hired to uncover the dead and put them into coffins).

No doubt the ambulance was guided by lanterns at the Crawford farm, where surgeons were busy operating, near growing piles of amputated limbs. One operating table was set up in the dining room of the house. Hundreds of wounded were reported to have been collected here, occupying the house, barn, sheds, other outbuildings, and the surrounding grounds. The last of them did not depart until six weeks later. Who knows when Reese and Southall succumbed? They may not have lasted to see the light of day on July 3, or they may have held on for days or even weeks. (Diary of Clifton; Greg Coco, A Vast Sea of Misery)
 
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Belle Montgomery

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I ran across this recently and thought it might of interest to someone

The remains of the following named persons are buried upon my farm. If any of their friends or relatives wish to have anything done with them, they can do by communicating with.

J.S. Crawford,

Gettysburg, Adams county, Pennsylvania



J.W. Snather, or Snathell.

J. Adams, co. A, 13th Miss. Vols.

W.J. Cromer, co. K, 13th Miss.

F. M. Raglin, co. K, 13th Miss. Vols.

N. L. McDuffie, Captain co. F, 18th Miss. Vols.

H. P. Beauchamp, co. E, 18th Miss. Vols.

James Worly, co. F, 21st Miss Vols.

H.L. Terrill, Howitzers.

H.P. Andrew.

Wm. Biggers. Georgia.

N. T. Teader, co. D, 17th Miss. Vols. - His last words were: "A widow – three sweet babes fatherless – mourning - Misirere mei Deus.”

J.W. Carter, Colonel 13th Miss. Vols.

R.G. Gunn, co. A. 17th Miss. Vols.

U. A. Hays, co. K, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.T. Hollowell, co. H, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.W. Davis, co. I, 13th Miss. Vols.

W. B. Connelly, 13th Miss, Vols.

J. C. Rawlson, 13th Miss. Vols.

C. Moore, co. F, 18th Miss. Vols.

H. Brister, co. I, 13th Miss. Vols.

J.W. Brice, co. E, 17th Miss. Vols.

A.P. P… the rest obliterated.

P.A. Robbins, co. C, 17th Miss.

J.W. Fraser

A.C. Reese, co. F, 10th regiment.

Wm. P. Casey.

Wm. Layman, 2nd co. N.A. of N. O.

C.H. Bryen, 3rd co. N.A. of N. O.

P.W. Neil.

Some of the head-boards cannot be deciphered, and many more have none at all.
:cry:
 
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