Confederate Civilians Following the Army into Maryland and Pennsylvania

Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
June 22, 1863, Sharpsburg, Maryland. “I have been looking for your father every day. There are a good many citizens from Va. following the army in hopes of getting horses and goods.” (June 22 letter of Lieutenant Green Berry Samuels, Company F, 10th Virginia, to his wife, A Civil War Marriage in Virginia, Reminiscences and Letters, Boyce, VA: Carr Publishing Co., 1956.)

June 22, 1863, Saint James College, Maryland. “Near tea-time a person named Sever came from Winchester [Virginia] in search of the slaves of his father. He carried off our [black] cook and her two children. It was a sad sight.” (The Civil War Diary of Joseph H. Coit, ed. by James McLachlan, Maryland Historical Magazine, vol. 60, no. 3, September 1965, published by the Maryland Historical Society.) [Comment: Professor Joseph Howland Coit, an Episcopal clergyman, was an instructor of Natural Science and Mathematics at the College of St. James, Maryland, located about six miles south of Hagerstown.]

June 26, 1863, near Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. “As Dr. Cherry, a citizen of Ala., who has been visiting his sons in our regiment, has concluded that he has travelled far enough into the enemy’s country and starts home tomorrow, thus affording me an opportunity of sending letters, I write. As the doctor may be captured, I can give you but a limited stock of news that would interest.” (June 26 letter of Lt. Col. David R. E. Winn, 4th Georgia, to his wife, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Special Collections, Emory University, on file at Gettysburg National Military Park.) [Comment: Regimental service records (Fold3) suggest two likely candidates for Dr. Cherry’s sons are 2nd Lieutenant William C. Cherry and Private James A. Cherry, both of Company D, 4th Georgia.]
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
June 26, 1863, near Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. “As Dr. Cherry, a citizen of Ala., who has been visiting his sons in our regiment, has concluded that he has travelled far enough into the enemy’s country and starts home tomorrow, thus affording me an opportunity of sending letters, I write. As the doctor may be captured, I can give you but a limited stock of news that would interest.” (June 26 letter of Lt. Col. David R. E. Winn, 4th Georgia, to his wife, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Special Collections, Emory University, on file at Gettysburg National Military Park.) [Comment: Regimental service records (Fold3) suggest two likely candidates for Dr. Cherry’s sons are 2nd Lieutenant William C. Cherry and Private James A. Cherry, both of Company D, 4th Georgia.]
Company D also included Sergeant Samuel Cherry.

Ryan
 

Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
Company D also included Sergeant Samuel Cherry.

Ryan
Yes, but Samuel was sent to the General Hospital in Farmville, Virginia on June 12, 1863 due to chronic diarrhea, and when he was released on July 1, he was ordered to the fortifications in Richmond, perhaps to help supervise workers.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
Yes, but Samuel was sent to the General Hospital in Farmville, Virginia on June 12, 1863 due to chronic diarrhea, and when he was released on July 1, he was ordered to the fortifications in Richmond, perhaps to help supervise workers.
He ended up in the Quartermaster Department in Augusta, Georgia at some point before the end of 1864. He may well have ended up there after a stint in Richmond.

Ryan
 
Top