Restricted Confederate battle flag continues to wave for Talladega fans

RobertP

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For context I have a car with a 6.4 liter naturally aspirated engine, with that said all those things you listed at the end can easily be attributed to electric cars as well. The current hyper cars are a hybrid right now, they combine both to achieve even greater performance.
Those hypers do have amazing performance. My only concern at this point is battery life/recharge time. I know those are improving which is great for casual driving but what if you really get on it or say tow a boat, how long are those batteries going to last.

There is a relatively new Formula E racing series with special rules. Racing has historically been the place where new auto technology was proven and it is expected that this will drive the development of more efficient batteries.
 

MattL

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Those hypers do have amazing performance. My only concern at this point is battery life/recharge time. I know those are improving which is great for casual driving but what if you really get on it or say tow a boat, how long are those batteries going to last.

There is a relatively new Formula E racing series with special rules. Racing has historically been the place where new auto technology was proven and it is expected that this will drive the development of more efficient batteries.

Yeah, battle life and recharge time are both bottlenecks, every shrinking ones. One of the big barriers is the same one that was for gas driven cars, gas stations (or charging stations in this case). They have really made a lot of progress on fast charging stations these days, but you need to install a bunch of them for people to use electric cars for travel purposes.

A lot of infrastructure involved. With that said it's far easy to set up a charging station that has access to the power grid vs a gas station that has to get gas brought in continually (and storage issues etc).

Still a ways off but it's gaining ground. Some really good electric cars out there these days, like the Teslas. They're only going to get better.
 

civilken

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it makes me so happy to hear that please give Ricky Bobby a big hug from me and pass the Mountain Dew.
 

jgoodguy

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Mark Martin has the best take on the decline in NASCAR

I think we should continue to be true to what we are. Where we came from. I think the racing is really good now. But, I also recognize the fact that NASCAR is not the only sport that is struggling with their fan base. All sports are.​
There’s a reason for that. Because young people have different interests. There’s competition for their interests, 1000 times over what it was when we grew up.​
Martin also noted that the youngest few generations simply aren’t into car culture in general like previous ones were, which is an opinion that’s hard to argue. But he reiterated that the “product is not the problem.”​
The problem is, the world’s changing. And our generations are changing. You can do your best to fight that but it’s definitely a tough battle to try to bring new people’s eyes to our sport and keep ’em there.​
If that sounds like a glass half full view, it definitely is. But consider that even with numbers falling more or less annually all decade, NASCAR races are still often the most watched sporting events on many pre-football weekends. Attendance is undoubtedly well down as well, but it’s coming from incredible heights where many tracks had seats for far more spectators than at any other kind of sporting event.​
 

Karen Lips

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"It's not hard to find the Confederate battle flag at Talladega Superspeedway.

Even on Wednesday – before the campgrounds filled with thousands of race fans for this weekend's NASCAR action – the flag could be seen flying, flapping in the wind outside motorhomes and prominently displayed by nearby vendors who also stocked plenty of Confederate-themed merchandise.

While the flag continues to stir controversy as a symbol of hatred, AL.com talked to race fans flying the flag, and virtually all of them said they don't consider it a symbol of hatred or racial divisiveness.

"Southern heritage," replied Robert Ogletree, from Shreveport, La., when asked why he's flying a Confederate battle flag. "It's a part of our history. Our history is the Civil War. End of story."

Mark Smith, Ogletree's friend from New Jersey, said he planted the Confederate battle flags as the campsite and said he flies them to honor Southern friends, whom he considers family. He insisted flying the flags is not intended as a hateful gesture.

"I don't hate nobody," Smith said.

The Confederate battle flag has been used by the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist groups.

Flag supporters – including many in the Talladega campgrounds – say it represents the South's heritage and culture and serves as a memorial to Civil War soldiers who died in battle.

In July 2015, NASCAR released a statement concerning the Confederate battle flag and asked fans "to refrain from displaying the Confederate Flag at our facilities and NASCAR events. We are committed to providing a welcoming atmosphere free of offensive symbols."

Visit Talladega this week and it's clear the battle flag remains near and dear for many NASCAR fans.

Larry Estes, a longtime Talladega fan from Martinsville, Virginia, said he sees the Confederate battle flag prominently displayed when he attends NASCAR Sprint Cup events in Bristol (Tenn.), Martinsville (Va.) and Richmond (Va.). Talladega isn't an outlier, he said, when it comes to NASCAR fans embracing the Confederate battle flag."

Read the rest of the article here: http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2016/10/heritage_or_hate_confederate_b.html
Well, good!
 
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mo
Wonder how they explain one of the more popular young guns in NASCAR, if they think the fans are heteful? Bubba Wallace Jr

bubba.jpg
 

O' Be Joyful

Sergeant Major
Now that was some racin'!

I have regretted since I posted above, not saying gentlemanly "discussions" vs. "altercations" :whistling:

Those were also the days, ahh, when I could put my '68 Camaro RS under a tree to work on it. :smile: Those days are gone, as well as some of the enthusiasm of do-it-yourselfers like me back then, that could easily add a Holley 4-bbl w/ trimmings, for a little extra. :biggrin: Now one has to be a computer x-spurt.
 

jgoodguy

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Race Car Costs: The High Price of Fielding a Racing Team

Want to race in NASCAR? Get ready to pony up. A 2014 article from Street & Smith's SportsBusiness Journal covered the finances of the Stewart-Haas (Tony Stewart and Gene Haas) racing team and found competition costs for a race at more than $1.4 million. That included the costs of the cars, which should last for more than one competition, but sometimes don't. The vehicles totaled $980,000, given the need to maintain primary and backup cars for each race. Each primary car cost approximately $200,000, with engine costs at roughly half of that total, and a chassis at $25,000.​
The team budgets $400,000 for firesuits for the year, but that didn't include the cost of dry cleaning: $2,400 per race. Even the ice bill for the weekend totaled $900. Don't forget to add team expenses that topped $125,000: flights and 44 hotel rooms took up over $82,000; transport for the cars, rental cars for the crew and support team, and other auxiliary transportation costs surpassed $30,000. The haulers that transport the car cost approximately $400,000 each and are replaced every five years.​
The cost of a NASCAR team through the season appears to be in the eight-digit range. An older Florida Times-Union report suggested that the costs approach $400,000 per week — if true, for a 38-week season, that is over $15 million in annual expenses.​
 

Viper21

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Those were also the days, ahh, when I could put my '68 Camaro RS under a tree to work on it. :smile: Those days are gone, as well as some of the enthusiasm of do-it-yourselfers like me back then, that could easily add a Holley 4-bbl w/ trimmings, for a little extra. :biggrin: Now one has to be a computer x-spurt.
I agree. Certainly not all, but most young fellars today, can barely change their own oil. When I was a teenager, most could do basic maintenance on their vehicles themselves, & darn near everybody could install a car stereo system...lol.
 

O' Be Joyful

Sergeant Major
I agree. Certainly not all, but most young fellars today, can barely change their own oil. When I was a teenager, most could do basic maintenance on their vehicles themselves, & darn near everybody could install a car stereo system...lol.

I exaggerated a bit. :redface: It was in the side barn, not under the tree. Never could tell when it might rain...and w/ the manifold off and to switch em together and to get the gasket right... :eek:
 

Viper21

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I exaggerated a bit. :redface: It was in the side barn, not under the tree. Never could tell when it might rain...and w/ the manifold off and to switch em together and to get the gasket right... :eek:
I once had the top half of my Trans Am's 403 in my living room...lol. Most of it was only there for 3 weeks. I could only work on it on the weekends. It was my first cam replacement, & I had the heads done at a machine shop. I suppose technically, the box of extra parts stayed in the living room till I moved...hahaha.
 
I have regretted since I posted above, not saying gentlemanly "discussions" vs. "altercations" :whistling:

Those were also the days, ahh, when I could put my '68 Camaro RS under a tree to work on it. :smile: Those days are gone, as well as some of the enthusiasm of do-it-yourselfers like me back then, that could easily add a Holley 4-bbl w/ trimmings, for a little extra. :biggrin: Now one has to be a computer x-spurt.

The memories. I used to rebuild Muncie rock crushers on my living room floor. Couldn't use the garage because I usually had a couple of Big Block builds going on and just didn't have the room.
 

Viper21

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The memories. I used to rebuild Muncie rock crushers on my living room floor. Couldn't use the garage because I usually had a couple of Big Block builds going on and just didn't have the room.
These DIY garages still exist. Just not in the numbers they did, when most of us were teenagers, or young. I believe it's more common in rural areas, as it's not uncommon at all for me to roll up to someones place, & them to have a hood open, & tinkering going on.

What I don't see much, is young fellars hanging around. Lots of free education was available back in the day, just handing wrenches, & rags. Again, my brush isn't too broad here, I do know some young fellars that'll attack anything but, by & large.... they are the minority today. Most are glued to their smartphones, & busy taking selfies.....
 
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