Muzzleldrs Colt Special Model Rifle Musket

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
South of the North 40
That might of been the ones issued out in 1861, about 25,000 of them. The other issue dates were 1863 (12,500) & 64 (37,500). According to THE RIFLED MUSKET by Claud E. Fuller. Great book brought it like 50 years ago for $4.95. It's on Amazon used for $18-45. Some guy selling brand new for $919. Gosh dang anyone know how to polish a book and make it look new?
Also in the book it states the only parts interchangeable with the Colt were Muskets made by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company or Lamson, Goodnow & Yale. Don't know if that includes barrels but if it does that might account for your 1862 barrel fitting well on that 1864 stock & lock. Now that I think of it all the pristine Colt muskets I've seen were dated 1864.
They were all interchangeable with each other but not with anything else. My own is a 1863 Amoskeag. I was looking for an LG & Y because that was the one I’ve seen with provenance to the 4th. IIRC the 1st MN one was a Colt.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Heard New Jersey also did the same with the several hundred Remington Pistols that are marked NJ. Stored them away in Arms Room in NJ and never saw action in CW. I had one once but when I heard that I traded it away.

Heard New Jersey also did the same with the several hundred Remington Pistols that are marked NJ. Stored them away in Arms Room in NJ and never saw action in CW. I had one once but when I heard that I traded it away.
New Jersey purchased 1,000 of the Remington NMAs. Many were "2nd quality", meaning they had been rejected by US military inspectors. That's another reason why these Remingtons are less desired by collectors.
 

bayonet

Corporal
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
New Jersey purchased 1,000 of the Remington NMAs. Many were "2nd quality", meaning they had been rejected by US military inspectors. That's another reason why these Remingtons are less desired by collectors.
Well then double the reason to trade it away. Although it's amusing that one of the worst pistols in the CW the Starr catch a high price $ today. Probably due to its notoriety. As the quote goes by a Union Officer "The Man who sold these pistols to the Government and the Contractor who brought them outright should be hanged as Traitors".:unsure:
 

johan_steele

Regimental Armorer
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
South of the North 40
Well then double the reason to trade it away. Although it's amusing that one of the worst pistols in the CW the Starr catch a high price $ today. Probably due to its notoriety. As the quote goes by a Union Officer "The Man who sold these pistols to the Government and the Contractor who brought them outright should be hanged as Traitors".:unsure:
The Starr was also rather well liked, depended upon who was writing the reports I think.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Re the NJ-marked Remington....I am willing to bet you that the serial number is within the following serial number range: 58,XXX - 75,XXX. Am I right?
 

Jeff in Ohio

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
That might of been the ones issued out in 1861, about 25,000 of them. The other issue dates were 1863 (12,500) & 64 (37,500). According to THE RIFLED MUSKET by Claud E. Fuller. Great book brought it like 50 years ago for $4.95. It's on Amazon used for $18-45. Some guy selling brand new for $919. Gosh dang anyone know how to polish a book and make it look new?
Also in the book it states the only parts interchangeable with the Colt were Muskets made by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company or Lamson, Goodnow & Yale. Don't know if that includes barrels but if it does that might account for your 1862 barrel fitting well on that 1864 stock & lock. Now that I think of it all the pristine Colt muskets I've seen were dated 1864.
The reason for limited interchangeability is pretty interesting, and shows Sam Colt's cleverness in business.
Colt got equipment to manufacture Enfield style rifle-muskets, and tried to get the US to buy them.
The Army would not make a contract for US makers to manufacture Enfields; the Army wanted only model 1861 rifle-muskets and refused to contract for an American factory to make Enfields.
So, Colt took a contract to make the Springfield Model 1861.
But Colt didn't make 1861s.
He (and Amoskeag and Lamson, Goodnow & Yale) made these "Special Model 1861" that still retained Enfield characteristics but looked pretty close to the model 1861.
It is as if Colt had 25,000 mules and when the Army refused to buy mules, demanding horses, Colt renamed his mules "Special Model Horses" and sold them to the Army on a contract to supply horse.
 

bayonet

Corporal
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Re the NJ-marked Remington....I am willing to bet you that the serial number is within the following serial number range: 58,XXX - 75,XXX. Am I right?
if your asking me, I can't remember. I traded it away many years ago once I found out they never left NJ during the War.
 
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