Colors of the 16th New York

AUG

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
7,346
Location
Texas
#1
16th%2BNY%2BColors.jpg

Sergeant John Lyon and Corporal Melvin Tucker of the 16th New York Volunteer Infantry holding their regiment's stand of colors. Regimental colors at right and National colors at left. ca. 1863
http://field-of-fire.com/union-sold...teer-infantry-regiment-with-their-flags-1863/

16thInfRegimental2011.0075.jpg

Regimental colors of the 16th New York.

On June 26, 1861, the 16th New York Volunteers arrived in New York City from Albany, New York. The men marched to Washington Square where, later that afternoon, the regiment received this regimental color from Robert Hone, a New York City lawyer, on behalf of Eliza Woolsey Howland.

At Gaines’ Mill, Virginia, June 27, 1862, after three color bearers in succession received wounds, Private John Moffitt heroically took up the regimental colors until wounded himself to earn the Medal of Honor.

While most regimental colors were made with a single piece of blue silk, this flag includes 13 individual strips of blue silk pieced together. The painted design, the Arms of the State of New York, appears on both sides with the design on the reverse in mirror image.
https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/btlflags/infantry/16thInfRegimental2011.0075.htm

The 16th, the 1st Northern New York regiment, was recruited mainly in St. Lawrence and Clinton counties, with one company from Franklin county. It was mustered into the service of the United States at Albany, May 15, 1861, for two years, went into camp near Bethlehem and left the state for Washington on June 26. Assigned to the 2nd brigade, 5th division, Army of Northeastern Virginia, it moved to Alexandria on July 11, from there to Manassas, where it was engaged but a very short time on the 21st and returned immediately after to Alexandria. On Sept. 15 it was ordered to Fort Lyon and attached to the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 1st corps, Army of the Potomac, which division later belonged with the same number to the 6th corps. The winter of 1861-62 was passed at Camp Franklin near Fairfax seminary, Va., where the regiment remained until April 6, when it was ordered to Catlett's station, but at once returned to camp and was then ordered to Yorktown, where it arrived on May 3. The regiment was in action at West Point, and at Gaines' mill, its loss being over 200 killed and wounded. It was present through the remainder of that week of battle, but was not closely engaged, then encamped at Harrison's landing until Aug. 16, when it returned for a brief period to Alexandria. In the battle at Cramp-ton's gap it was in advance and lost heavily in a brilliant dash; was held in reserve at Antietam; at Fredericksburg was posted on picket duty, and after the battle went into winter quarters near Falmouth. It shared the hardships and discomforts of the "Mud March" under Gen. Burnside and was active in the Chancellorsville campaign, with a loss at Salem Church of 20 killed, 87 wounded and 49 missing. A few days were next spent at Banks' ford, then a short time in the old camp at Falmouth, and on May 22, 1863, the regiment was mustered out at Albany. During its term of service its loss was 112 men killed or mortally wounded and 84 deaths from other causes. The three years men were transferred to the 121 st N.Y.
https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/16thInf/16thInfMain.htm

More detailed history of the 16th New York.
http://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/16thInf/16thInfBMSHistSketch.htm
 
Last edited:

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
10,117
#3
That's a great photo. Maybe I missed something, but do we know the identities of those two proud soldiers? Do we know what happened to them? Man....those are battle-worn flags for sure.
 

AUG

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
7,346
Location
Texas
#6
That's a great photo. Maybe I missed something, but do we know the identities of those two proud soldiers? Do we know what happened to them? Man....those are battle-worn flags for sure.
Just found this, which identifies them as Sergeant John Lyon and Corporal Melvin Tucker, and notes that the photo was taken in 1865. Edit: Although it was probably taken in 1863 because regiment returned Albany, NY in May 1863 and mustered out there.
https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/btlflags/conservation/conservationImage2men.htm

conservingTwoFlagsMen.jpg
 
Last edited:

Pvt.Shattuck

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
1,835
Location
Tampa, FL
#10
That's a great photo. Maybe I missed something, but do we know the identities of those two proud soldiers? Do we know what happened to them? Man....those are battle-worn flags for sure.
Melvin Tucker, Co C, died March 23, 1887. He was only 5'5' tall. John Lyon, Co A, was 5'10" and moved to Oakland, CA after the war.
 

Pvt.Shattuck

Sergeant Major
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
1,835
Location
Tampa, FL
#11
There are two images. The men are holding the flags in slightly different positions.
16th best image.jpg

P3711_Two_Soldiers_holding_flags_-_16th_Regiment__Albany_2.jpg

In my opinion, Melvin Tucker can also be seen in this Brady albumen print from the Peninsular Campaign in 1862, standing third from right.
16th ny wetplate albumen CDV  Brady 1862 (2).jpg

16th ny wetplate albumen CDV  Brady 1862 (294x178) (2).jpg
 

AUG

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
7,346
Location
Texas
#12
Both mustered out with the regiment in May '63 and the 16th's records don't indicate that they reenlisted in another unit.

R
Well, I suspect the photograph was indeed taken in 1863, as the regiment returned to Albany, NY in May 1863.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
1
#14
Melvin Tucker was my great-great-grandfather. He died in a post-war mining accident falling down the shaft of the ore mine in Lyon Mountain, New York, not far from Plattsburgh. The GAR post there was named after him. I have some suspicion this photo was taken after the end of the war when regiments gathered and presented the flags in Albany, but no evidence.
 
Last edited:

chellers

Lt. Colonel
Retired Moderator
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Apr 20, 2013
Messages
9,998
Location
East Texas
#15
Melvin Tucker was my great-great-grandfather. He died in a post-war mining accident falling down the shaft of the ore mine in Lyon Mountain, New York, not far from Plattsburgh. The GAR post there was named after him. I have some suspicion this photo was taken after the end of the war when regiments gathered and presented the flags in Albany, but no evidence.
Thank you for the information, and welcome to Civil War Talk.
 

Similar threads




(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top