Colonel Washington Hardy, 60th North Carolina at Bentonville.

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The actions of Colonel Washington Hardy, 60th North Carolina, as he led Reynold's Brigade at Bentonville.

"While General McLaws held the extreme left of our lines and the enemy were endeavoring to turn our flank the Fiftieth North Carolina Regiment and the Tenth North Carolina Battalion of Colonel Hardy's Brigade, in a single charge and in about five minutes time sustained a loss of about one-third of their number. In this case the enemy were lying in line three columns deep and reserved their fire until our troops were near them struggling through a dense swamp. At the first volley every man fell to the ground and Colonel Wortham and Lieutenant Lane, of the Fiftieth, and Lieutenant Powell, of the Tenth Battalion, crawled out of the thicket and reported to General McLaws for duty, stating that the entire brigade was killed or wounded. Colonel Hardy, by his boldness and daring, saved the command from utter destruction.

Dressed in a suit of sky blue broadcloth and broad-brimmed slouch hat, he might easily be taken for a Federal officer. He was in front of his men leading the charge, and at the first volley he rushed forward with his hat in one hand and his sword in the other, and pacing up and down in front of and within a few feet of the Federal lines, ordered them to cease firing, as they were firing on their own men. He continued this for some time, although their own officers were ordering them to fire. They were utterly confused and before the firing was resumed all of our men who were able had crawled out of the swamp and made their escape, and Colonel Hardy deliberately walked off without a scratch."

2nd Lt. J.C. Ellington - 50th North Carolina

Photo: Colonel Washington Hardy - 60th North Carolina
 

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I have been to Bentonville and it was very interesting---Had a relative, from N.C., in the fight commanding Arkansas troops. After the war he went home and his wife was dead and his house was burned. He ended up going to Arkansas where some of his former comrades were located. Ended up marrying out there and never came back. So I know the family is now all over the place. The house used as a hospital with all the old medical instruments were especially interesting.
 
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10th battalion Heavy artillery was stationed at forts along the Cape fear guarding Wimington till late in the war. They ended up fighting as infantry as part of McLaws division, in Hardy's brigade. The 50th NC took part in the peninsula campaign and then sent back to NC, opposing the federal incursions in eastern NC. They were supposed to rejoin the ANV but federal incursions ended up keeping them there. Hardys brigade was supposed to be part of the main attack earlier with the AoT but were rerouted by our boy Bragg to support Hokes division, a mistake by Bragg which took weight away from the attack at Bentonville.
I had 2 grandfathers in the 10th, an uncle and cousin in the 50th. Because of the situation, the last monthly muster for the 10th that I have found was in late fall 1864. I do know none of them died there. An interesting story about Hardy.
 

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10th battalion Heavy artillery was stationed at forts along the Cape fear guarding Wimington till late in the war. They ended up fighting as infantry as part of McLaws division, in Hardy's brigade. The 50th NC took part in the peninsula campaign and then sent back to NC, opposing the federal incursions in eastern NC. They were supposed to rejoin the ANV but federal incursions ended up keeping them there. Hardys brigade was supposed to be part of the main attack earlier with the AoT but were rerouted by our boy Bragg to support Hokes division, a mistake by Bragg which took weight away from the attack at Bentonville.
I had 2 grandfathers in the 10th, an uncle and cousin in the 50th. Because of the situation, the last monthly muster for the 10th that I have found was in late fall 1864. I do know none of them died there. An interesting story about Hardy.
I had a great grandfather who had served in the heavy artillery 40th regiment (3rd) at coastal forts until late in the war. After the fall of Fort Fisher, he served in the infantry at Wyse Fork and Bentonville. My father used to tell stories his grandfather told him about Bentonville and the other places he served during the war.
 
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I had a great grandfather who had served in the heavy artillery 40th regiment (3rd) at coastal forts until late in the war. After the fall of Fort Fisher, he served in the infantry at Wyse Fork and Bentonville. My father used to tell stories his grandfather told him about Bentonville and the other places he served during the war.
40th was in ft Fisher for both battles right? That was some desperate fighting. Cant imagine standing that bombardment they took. I remember reading about one of the artillery pieces being in action and an instant later it and its crew were obliterated.
 

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40th was in ft Fisher for both battles right? That was some desperate fighting. Cant imagine standing that bombardment they took. I remember reading about one of the artillery pieces being in action and an instant later it and its crew were obliterated.
No, it was at Fort Holmes during the first battle. Three batteries, including my great father's Battery E, was sent to reinforce Fort Fisher after the first battle.
 



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