Colonel Waller Tazewell Patton at Gettsyburg

White Flint Bill

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
566
Location
Southern Virginia
Colonel Patton (great uncle of the George Patton of WWII fame) was mortally wounded during Pickett's Charge. Below is an account of his wounding. I think it comes from a book titled Patton: A Genius for War by Carlo D'Este. Can anyone confirm whether this account is accurate/reliable?

The incident in which Tazewell was wounded was witnessed by an enemy artillery officer, Lt. Henry T. Lee, whose battery had been positioned just behind the stone wall. During the attack, he saw the two officers jump on the wall holding hands and instantly fall. The act so impressed him that when the charge was repulsed he went to look for them. One, a boy of nineteen, was dead, the other had his jaw shattered and was dying from a ghastly wound. The wounded officer motioned to Lee for a pencil and paper and wrote as follows: "As we approached the wall my cousin and regimental adjutant, Captain (name forgotten) pressed to my side and said: `Its our turn next, Tazewell.' We grasped hands and jumped on the wall. Send this to my mother so that she may know that her son has lived up to and died according to her ideals."
 

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,571
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Colonel Patton (great uncle of the George Patton of WWII fame) was mortally wounded during Pickett's Charge. Below is an account of his wounding. I think it comes from a book titled Patton: A Genius for War by Carlo D'Este. Can anyone confirm whether this account is accurate/reliable?

The incident in which Tazewell was wounded was witnessed by an enemy artillery officer, Lt. Henry T. Lee, whose battery had been positioned just behind the stone wall. During the attack, he saw the two officers jump on the wall holding hands and instantly fall. The act so impressed him that when the charge was repulsed he went to look for them. One, a boy of nineteen, was dead, the other had his jaw shattered and was dying from a ghastly wound. The wounded officer motioned to Lee for a pencil and paper and wrote as follows: "As we approached the wall my cousin and regimental adjutant, Captain (name forgotten) pressed to my side and said: `Its our turn next, Tazewell.' We grasped hands and jumped on the wall. Send this to my mother so that she may know that her son has lived up to and died according to her ideals."
https://gettysburgcompiler.org/2017/05/10/a-gun-with-a-story-waller-pattons-civil-war-pistol/

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9078/waller-tazewell-patton
 

Tom Elmore

Sergeant Major
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
Messages
2,414
I was unaware of the above account by a Lt. Lee. However, I do have a copy of a July 15 letter sent by Col. Patton to his mother from the (Pennsylvania, now Gettysburg) College Hospital just north of town. It comes from the Swem Library at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Patton writes of his fractured jaw bone on both sides; he expected to recover. However, he died on July 21. The circumstances of his death are reported in a July 24 letter from Baltimore by Isaac W. Smith to John M. Patton. Smith embalmed the body and deposited it in the John J. Gettings vault at Green Mount cemetery. Smith retained Patton's two rings, pipe and a lock of hair, while Assistant Surgeon James W. Oliver had his watch. No mention of a pistol - I imagine such a weapon would be stored with Patton's belongings in a regimental wagon and carried back to Virginia. If carried into action, it would have been confiscated by his Federal captors.

The Adjutant (with the rank of Lieutenant) of the 7th Virginia, John Henry Parr, survived the battle and the war. At the very least the account may be garbled. There was a Lt. Henry T. Lee, but he was aide-de-camp to Gen. Doubleday. In that capacity, it is conceivable Lee checked on Confederate wounded after the July 3 charge, Doubleday's headquarters I think being established at the Hummelbaugh house on that day.
 
Last edited:

Cavalier

Private
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
107
Tom Elmore: When you mention Col. Patton being deposited in a vault in the Greenmount Cemetery, in Baltimore, am I correct in assuming he is still there? There are a few Confederate Generals buried there I believe. Having an interest in General Patton I would be interested to know if that is the case. Thanks to you and White Flint Bill for the above information.
 

Cavalier

Private
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
107
Tom Elmore: Please excuse my error in asking you the above question. I failed to notice the posting of east tennessee roots showing the photo of Col. Patton's grave. Apologies to all!
 


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top