Colonel John S. Mosby's Warrenton, Virginia

James N.

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During the Civil War the town of Warrenton was county seat of Fauquier County, Virginia, and changed hands several times as the armies of both sides ranged across the countryside. It lies only a short distance southwest of the twin battlefields of Bull Run/Manassas and served as a vast hospital following both of those momentous engagements. Later, in November of 1862, the Warren Green Tavern just behind the courthouse was the scene of the transfer of command of the Union's Army of the Potomac from Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan to his successor, Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside, as described on the historical marker which stands beside the venerable hostelry, now county offices.

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G.B.McClellan, Burnside, Mosby.jpg

Above, Generals George B. McClellan at right and Ambrose Burnside, left, flank John S. Mosby, seen as a lieutenant colonel.

According to local legend, another witness to "Little Mac's" adieux was John Singleton Mosby, who was acting as a scout for Confederate Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart; Warrenton soon thereafter became a prime location of more exploits by Mosby as the leader of his own 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion, better known as Mosby's Rangers. According to another probably apocryphal legend, during another clandestine visit, Mosby was being shaved by a barber in his shop in the building below when it was entered by Union officers who were looking for the elusive raider. The quick-thinking barber smeared Mosby's face with lather, and both men denied knowing anything about Mosby or his whereabouts!

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On another occasion, following his most famous exploit, that of seizing Union Brig. Gen. Edwin Stoughton from his headquarters in Fairfax, Mosby brought his captive here to breakfast with the John G. Beckham family, with whose son Stoughton had roomed at West Point only a few years earlier. Today a stone obelisk erected on the courthouse lawn in 1920 commemorates Mosby and states, "He has left a name that will live till honor, virtue, courage all shall cease to claim the homage of the heart."

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pauline-mosby-wife-of-john-singleton-mosby-circa-1870-who-died-giving-dy2778.jpg


Mosby and his beloved wife of many years Pauline made Warrenton their home beginning in 1865 when the lawyer rented a house north of town, for a time walking from there four miles to-and-from his law office, which was located across from the courthouse. By 1875, he felt established enough to move into town, buying the former home of Judge Spillman seen below. Unfortunately, their stay there was to be a short one, as Pauline tragically died in childbirth in May, 1876. Mosby only lived there another year, for by that time he had become a Republican and had supported not only Ulysses S. Grant but also his former enemy Rutherford B. Hayes for President. This unvarnished support caused many of Mosby's former clients to leave him and his practice plummeted; in 1877 he left Warrenton for good, following what may have been an assassination attempt when someone took a potshot at him

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According the the tour handbook published by the Mosby Heritage Association,

As Warrenton was the postwar home of Mosby's daughter, Virginia Stuart Mosby Coleman, Colonel Mosby often visited the town in his last years. After his stint as U. S. Consul to Hong Kong ended in 1885, Mosby used his connections with Leland Stanford's Southern Pacific Railroad. Accordingly, he lived in San Francisco for many years. In 1901 he began to work for the U. S. Interior Department as a special agent in the General Land Office and later worked until 1910 as an attorney with the U. S. Justice Department in Washington. But in the final years before his death in 1916, Colonel Mosby often visited Northern Virginia and was seen motoring nearby about the former Mosby's Confederacy... Mosby died at age 82 during an operation at Garfield Hospital on Memorial Day 1916.

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Above, Confederate cavalry generals Lunsford Lomax at left and William H. F. Payne at right flank the octogenarian John S. Mosby as he appeared in 1915, the year before his death. Mosby's connection with Warrenton hadn't ended in 1877 because members of his family continued to reside here. His funeral was held in Warrenton on June 1, 1916, attended by his family and many surviving members of his wartime command. Today the much-decorated grave of John S. Mosby is located between that of his wife Pauline and his daughter, surrounded by other family members; below, that of Brig, Gen. William H. F. Payne who is also buried here, along with Brig. Gen. Lunsford Lomax and many of the members of Mosby's Rangers and other units.

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A burial mound in Warrenton Cemetery beneath the handsome monument below also contains the graves of the many Confederate soldiers who died here in hospitals following the battles of Bull Run/Manassas. For additional photos and information about the cemetery, please see: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/warrenton-cemetery-warrenton-virginia.139164/

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Rio Bravo

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Yet more fantastic photos James N !
Mosby saved the area known as “Virginia Horse Country” - the Counties of Clarke,Fauquier,Loudoun,Warren, and Frederick. Not a Plantation was lost. He must have been a Hero to all those people who lived in that area or who loved it !
 

James N.

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Yet more fantastic photos James N !
Mosby saved the area known as “Virginia Horse Country” - the Counties of Clarke,Fauquier,Loudoun,Warren, and Frederick. Not a Plantation was lost. He must have been a Hero to all those people who lived in that area or who loved it !
At least as of now, before political correctness takes its toll, U. S. Highway 50 - the former Little River Turnpike - which crosses the area east-to-west is still known as the John S. Mosby Highway!
 

Rio Bravo

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At least as of now, before political correctness takes its toll, U. S. Highway 50 - the former Little River Turnpike - which crosses the area east-to-west is still known as the John S. Mosby Highway!
I like that bit of information James ! Seems like Mosby was a Highwayman !!!
 

kholland

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At least as of now, before political correctness takes its toll, U. S. Highway 50 - the former Little River Turnpike - which crosses the area east-to-west is still known as the John S. Mosby Highway!
And here is a great site for the Mosby Heritage Area Tour. It has links to pages on a wide variety of towns, places and historical markers that were part of Mosby's Confederacy. These pages have stories and photos on the events that transpired there.

http://www.civilwaralbum.com/misc5/mosby1.htm
 
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Excellent photos and narrative James N.! Mosby has always been one of my favorite personages in the Civil War.
My late wife had farm family in Loudoun County and I would visit often to hear endless stories of Mosby's exploits. About half the stories panned out to be true. Nevertheless, Mosby remains a true living legend among the common folk of northern Virginia.
 

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James N. I went on a bus tour many years ago through Mosby's Confederacy with Horace Mewborn as our tour guide and a lot of your pictures bring back many memories of that tour. I want to take this opportunity and thank you for those wonderful memories. David.
 

James N.

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Excellent photos and narrative James N.! Mosby has always been one of my favorite personages in the Civil War.
My late wife had farm family in Loudoun County and I would visit often to hear endless stories of Mosby's exploits. About half the stories panned out to be true. Nevertheless, Mosby remains a true living legend among the common folk of northern Virginia.
Here's another look at one of the most famous Mosby Warrenton legends, courtesy of the old 1950's Classics Illustrated:

Image (13).jpg
 

James N.

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James N.

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When out and about in Warrenton...if one gets thirsty or hungry...

http://mollysirishpub.com/#family-style

Cheers!
USS ALASKA
That looks good, but by the end of the day here in Warrenton after making our tour of Mosby's Confederacy, we hurried back to Middleburg and our dinner reservations we had made earlier in the day when we were at the Red Fox Inn!

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White Flint Bill

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Southern Virginia
View attachment 162300

During the Civil War the town of Warrenton was county seat of Fauquier County, Virginia, and changed hands several times as the armies of both sides ranged across the countryside. It lies only a short distance southwest of the twin battlefields of Bull Run/Manassas and served as a vast hospital following both of those momentous engagements. Later, in November of 1862, the Warren Green Tavern just behind the courthouse was the scene of the transfer of command of the Union's Army of the Potomac from Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan to his successor, Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside, as described on the historical marker which stands beside the venerable hostelry, now county offices.

View attachment 162301

View attachment 162314
Above, Generals George B. McClellan at right and Ambrose Burnside, left, flank John S. Mosby, seen as a lieutenant colonel.

According to local legend, another witness to "Little Mac's" adieux was John Singleton Mosby, who was acting as a scout for Confederate Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart; Warrenton soon thereafter became a prime location of more exploits by Mosby as the leader of his own 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion, better known as Mosby's Rangers. According to another probably apocryphal legend, during another clandestine visit, Mosby was being shaved by a barber in his shop in the building below when it was entered by Union officers who were looking for the elusive raider. The quick-thinking barber smeared Mosby's face with lather, and both men denied knowing anything about Mosby or his whereabouts!

View attachment 162303

On another occasion, following his most famous exploit, that of seizing Union Brig. Gen. Edwin Stoughton from his headquarters in Fairfax, Mosby brought his captive here to breakfast with the John G. Beckham family, with whose son Stoughton had roomed at West Point only a few years earlier. Today a stone obelisk erected on the courthouse lawn in 1920 commemorates Mosby and states, "He has left a name that will live till honor, virtue, courage all shall cease to claim the homage of the heart."

View attachment 162302

View attachment 162306

Mosby and his beloved wife of many years Pauline made Warrenton their home beginning in 1865 when the lawyer rented a house north of town, for a time walking from there four miles to-and-from his law office, which was located across from the courthouse. By 1875, he felt established enough to move into town, buying the former home of Judge Spillman seen below. Unfortunately, their stay there was to be a short one, as Pauline tragically died in childbirth in May, 1876. Mosby only lived there another year, for by that time he had become a Republican and had supported not only Ulysses S. Grant but also his former enemy Rutherford B. Hayes for President. This unvarnished support caused many of Mosby's former clients to leave him and his practice plummeted; in 1877 he left Warrenton for good, following what may have been an assassination attempt when someone took a potshot at him

View attachment 162307

According the the tour handbook published by the Mosby Heritage Association,

As Warrenton was the postwar home of Mosby's daughter, Virginia Stuart Mosby Coleman, Colonel Mosby often visited the town in his last years. After his stint as U. S. Consul to Hong Kong ended in 1885, Mosby used his connections with Leland Stanford's Southern Pacific Railroad. Accordingly, he lived in San Francisco for many years. In 1901 he began to work for the U. S. Interior Department as a special agent in the General Land Office and later worked until 1910 as an attorney with the U. S. Justice Department in Washington. But in the final years before his death in 1916, Colonel Mosby often visited Northern Virginia and was seen motoring nearby about the former Mosby's Confederacy... Mosby died at age 82 during an operation at Garfield Hospital on Memorial Day 1916.

View attachment 162308

View attachment 162299

Above, Confederate cavalry generals Lunsford Lomax at left and William H. F. Payne at right flank the octogenarian John S. Mosby as he appeared in 1915, the year before his death. Mosby's connection with Warrenton hadn't ended in 1877 because members of his family continued to reside here. His funeral was held in Warrenton on June 1, 1916, attended by his family and many surviving members of his wartime command. Today the much-decorated grave of John S. Mosby is located between that of his wife Pauline and his daughter, surrounded by other family members; below, that of Brig, Gen. William H. F. Payne who is also buried here, along with Brig. Gen. Lunsford Lomax and many of the members of Mosby's Rangers and other units.

View attachment 162309

A burial mound in Warrenton Cemetery beneath the handsome monument below also contains the graves of the many Confederate soldiers who died here in hospitals following the battles of Bull Run/Manassas. For additional photos and information about the cemetery, please see: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/warrenton-cemetery-warrenton-virginia.139164/

View attachment 162310
Excellent post! Thanks for sharing.

Mosby managed to stay as controversial after the War as he'd been during it. There are lots of fascinating stories about the Rangers.
 


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