Col. Joseph H. Parsons

Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Not having much luck searching on Internet.
Me either. One of Brownlow's sons (John B.) was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the 9th Cav.

Ninth Cavalry
TENNESSEE
(3-YEARS)
Ninth Cavalry. -- Col., Joseph H. Parsons; Lieut.-Col., John
B. Brownlow; Majs., Etheldred W. Armstrong, Samuel Hunt, Jr.,
Edward Black, John C. Wright, David C. Dossett, James H.
Hornsby.

This regiment was organized at Camp Nelson from East Tennessee
refugees in the early part of 1863, with Joseph H. Parsons, of
Knox County, as colonel.

It assisted in the capture of Cumberland Gap, after which it
escorted the prisoners to Lexington, Ky. Returning to
Knoxville, it remained there until after the siege of that
place, and was then detailed to escort prisoners to Camp
Nelson, from which place it was ordered to Nashville, where it
arrived in January and remained until about May 1.

It was stationed at Gallatin from that time until August, when
it was constituted a portion of the brigade known as the
"Governor's Guards," under the command of Gen. Gillem, which
then entered upon a campaign in East Tennessee. It
participated with great gallantry in all the battles of that
campaign, and at Bull's Gap a large portion of the regiment
was taken prisoners.

A large part of the 11th cavalry having also been captured it
was consolidated with the remainder of the 9th. On March 21,
1865, it entered upon the raid through Virginia, North and
South Carolina and Georgia under Gen. Stoneman. It returned
to Tennessee in May and was mustered out at Knoxville in Sept.
1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 386

**********************************************************************************

Report of Lieut. Samuel E. Miller, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, of
action at Hays' Ferry.

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY,
Near Mossy Creek, January 1, 1864.
GEN.: In accordance with instructions received this a. m., through
Capt. Sharp, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, I have the honor to report that
I was captured during the engagement near Dandridge on the 24th
ultimo, and was taken to the rear beyond Holt's house, on Dandridge
and Bend of Chucky road, 7 miles from Dandridge. I was detained there
till evening of 25th, was then moved to Kimbro's Cross-Roads, and to
Morristown on Saturday, 26th.

I escaped on the night of the 26th from the guard, and reached our lines
at Mossy Creek on the morning of 31st December.

From the best information I could obtain there was but one brigade
of infantry at Morristown. Longstreet, with the greater portion of the
remainder of the infantry, was at Russellville, with headquarters at that
place. There were no fortifications at Morristown. Armstrong's and
Martin's cavalry commands were in the vicinity of Panther Springs and
Widow Kimbrough's. I could not learn where Jones' cavalry was. There
was no infantry on the Bend of Chucky road between Morristown and
Cheek's Cross-Roads.

The rebels have taken all the axes from the citizens about Kimbrough's
Cross-Roads, and reliable citizens informed me that the enemy were
blockading the road between Morristown and Dandridge. I hear a great
deal of chopping in the direction of that road on last Wednesday,
December 30, the day after the fight at Mossy Creek. I was then on
Bay's Mountain, within 2 miles of Widow Kimbrough's. At least
one-third of the infantry that I saw were without shoes, and poorly
clothed.

One pound of flour and three-Quarters pound meat was the ration issued
to the prisoners. There were about 30 Federal prisoners at Morristown
when I left. I could learn nothing of any movement toward Paint Rock.
Longstreet's forces are estimated at from 25,000 to 30,000. My guards
knew nothing of any re-enforcements having arrived lately.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL E. MILLER,
Second Lieut., Ninth Tennessee Cavalry.

Maj.-Gen. PARKE.

I have reported to Brig.-Gen. Elliott.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLIII.] ACTION AT CALHOUN, TENN., ETC. PAGE 640-54
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]
 

limestone1863

Private
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Me either. One of Brownlow's sons (John B.) was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the 9th Cav.

Ninth Cavalry
TENNESSEE
(3-YEARS)
Ninth Cavalry. -- Col., Joseph H. Parsons; Lieut.-Col., John
B. Brownlow; Majs., Etheldred W. Armstrong, Samuel Hunt, Jr.,
Edward Black, John C. Wright, David C. Dossett, James H.
Hornsby.

This regiment was organized at Camp Nelson from East Tennessee
refugees in the early part of 1863, with Joseph H. Parsons, of
Knox County, as colonel.

It assisted in the capture of Cumberland Gap, after which it
escorted the prisoners to Lexington, Ky. Returning to
Knoxville, it remained there until after the siege of that
place, and was then detailed to escort prisoners to Camp
Nelson, from which place it was ordered to Nashville, where it
arrived in January and remained until about May 1.

It was stationed at Gallatin from that time until August, when
it was constituted a portion of the brigade known as the
"Governor's Guards," under the command of Gen. Gillem, which
then entered upon a campaign in East Tennessee. It
participated with great gallantry in all the battles of that
campaign, and at Bull's Gap a large portion of the regiment
was taken prisoners.

A large part of the 11th cavalry having also been captured it
was consolidated with the remainder of the 9th. On March 21,
1865, it entered upon the raid through Virginia, North and
South Carolina and Georgia under Gen. Stoneman. It returned
to Tennessee in May and was mustered out at Knoxville in Sept.
1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 386

**********************************************************************************

Report of Lieut. Samuel E. Miller, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, of
action at Hays' Ferry.

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY,
Near Mossy Creek, January 1, 1864.
GEN.: In accordance with instructions received this a. m., through
Capt. Sharp, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, I have the honor to report that
I was captured during the engagement near Dandridge on the 24th
ultimo, and was taken to the rear beyond Holt's house, on Dandridge
and Bend of Chucky road, 7 miles from Dandridge. I was detained there
till evening of 25th, was then moved to Kimbro's Cross-Roads, and to
Morristown on Saturday, 26th.

I escaped on the night of the 26th from the guard, and reached our lines
at Mossy Creek on the morning of 31st December.

From the best information I could obtain there was but one brigade
of infantry at Morristown. Longstreet, with the greater portion of the
remainder of the infantry, was at Russellville, with headquarters at that
place. There were no fortifications at Morristown. Armstrong's and
Martin's cavalry commands were in the vicinity of Panther Springs and
Widow Kimbrough's. I could not learn where Jones' cavalry was. There
was no infantry on the Bend of Chucky road between Morristown and
Cheek's Cross-Roads.

The rebels have taken all the axes from the citizens about Kimbrough's
Cross-Roads, and reliable citizens informed me that the enemy were
blockading the road between Morristown and Dandridge. I hear a great
deal of chopping in the direction of that road on last Wednesday,
December 30, the day after the fight at Mossy Creek. I was then on
Bay's Mountain, within 2 miles of Widow Kimbrough's. At least
one-third of the infantry that I saw were without shoes, and poorly
clothed.

One pound of flour and three-Quarters pound meat was the ration issued
to the prisoners. There were about 30 Federal prisoners at Morristown
when I left. I could learn nothing of any movement toward Paint Rock.
Longstreet's forces are estimated at from 25,000 to 30,000. My guards
knew nothing of any re-enforcements having arrived lately.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL E. MILLER,
Second Lieut., Ninth Tennessee Cavalry.

Maj.-Gen. PARKE.

I have reported to Brig.-Gen. Elliott.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLIII.] ACTION AT CALHOUN, TENN., ETC. PAGE 640-54
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]​
Thanks for for reply. Had not come across that correspondence before. Appreciate it.
 

limestone1863

Private
Joined
Sep 19, 2019
Thanks for for reply. Had not come across that correspondence before. Appreciate it.
I know Col. Parsons was charged with Murder, found Guilty & sentenced to be hanged in Spring/Summer 1865, but Gen. Stoneman dismissed sentence because of good service during war and his wrong, but sincere action in the thought to protect his life & was honorably mustered out. Found nothing after that. No into anywhere in USA on Find A Grave or anywhere else. Would like to find out what happen to him after CW,
 
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