Col. George Doles' Sharpsburg report?

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Bruce Vail

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Jul 8, 2015
Can anyone help me locate the official after action report of the battle of Sharpsburg of Col. George Doles of the 4th Georgia Infantry?

Col. Doles had assumed temporary command of Ripley's Brigade during the battle and I suppose would have made his report to division commander D. H. Hill.
 

kholland

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Howard County, Maryland
Can anyone help me locate the official after action report of the battle of Sharpsburg of Col. George Doles of the 4th Georgia Infantry?

Col. Doles had assumed temporary command of Ripley's Brigade during the battle and I suppose would have made his report to division commander D. H. Hill.
Here is an excerpt from Ripley' s after battle report followed by a link to the entire report. As you see Ripley was only out of commission for a short time so he gave a report. But he alludes to a report from Doles for the segment he was involved in. And I could not find this on the AOTW website or online.

"While engaged in reforming the brigade, I received a shot in the neck, which disabled me, and the troops moved forward under command of Colonel Doles, of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. After an absence of an hour and a half, I returned to the field with such force as I could collect from detachment I could collect from detachments, and found my brigade relieved and in position to the west of Sharpsburg. I remained with it until the afternoon,when, finding myseld faint and exhausted, I relinquished the command to Colonel Doles, to whose report I must refer for the operations of the brigade while under his command"

http://antietam.aotw.org/exhibit.php?exhibit_id=238
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Here is an excerpt from Ripley' s after battle report followed by a link to the entire report. As you see Ripley was only out of commission for a short time so he gave a report. But he alludes to a report from Doles for the segment he was involved in. And I could not find this on the AOTW website or online.

"While engaged in reforming the brigade, I received a shot in the neck, which disabled me, and the troops moved forward under command of Colonel Doles, of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. After an absence of an hour and a half, I returned to the field with such force as I could collect from detachment I could collect from detachments, and found my brigade relieved and in position to the west of Sharpsburg. I remained with it until the afternoon,when, finding myseld faint and exhausted, I relinquished the command to Colonel Doles, to whose report I must refer for the operations of the brigade while under his command"

http://antietam.aotw.org/exhibit.php?exhibit_id=238
Thanks, kholland!

I was reading Ripley's report myself this morning when I noticed the reference to the Doles report. I couldn't find it on line either.
 
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M E Wolf

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/2 [S# 13]
PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN--SEVEN DAYS' BATTLES
No. 307 -- Reports of Maj. Gen. Benjamin Huger, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations June 25-July 1, including the engagement at King's SchoolHouse, or Oak Grove, action at Brackett's, and battle of Malvern Hill.
HEADQUARTERS OF DIVISION,
Falling Creek, Chesterfield County, July 21, 1862.
GENERAL: I submit herewith the reports of different commanders in this division, showing the part taken by the troops under their command in the battles near Richmond between June 25 and July 1:
Immediately after the battle of Seven Pines my division was posted in the advance opposite that position of the enemy from which our troops retired on the morning of June 2. Our line extended from the York River Railroad across the Williamsburg road to and beyond the Charles City road. Major-General Longstreet, commanding right wing, furnished additional brigades to assist in performing the arduous picket duty, and placed all the troops of his command at my disposal for support in case of need. I continually pushed the pickets up to the enemy's works and offered them battle daily, always shooting or capturing every individual we could.
[excerpt]
On the morning of June 25 the brigade of Brigadier-General Ransom (six regiments of North Carolina troops) joined me, by your order, and was placed in rear of our line as a support. The picket line, which extended through the woods close up to the enemy's works, consisted of the Fourth Georgia Regiment, Colonel [George] Doles, on the right of the Williamsburg road, and the Ninth Virginia Regiment, Fifth Virginia Battalion, and Fifty-third Virginia Regiment, of General Armistead's brigade, between the Williamsburg road and the railroad.

At daylight the enemy made a severe attack on our picket line, which was re-enforced by Generals Armistead and Wright bringing up their regiments from our intrenchments, and by the regiments of General Ransom's brigade, which had just arrived, and were promptly brought up by him as supports. One of the latter regiments (the Twenty-fifth North Carolina, Colonel [Henry M.] Rutledge) was pushed to the left of the Williamsburg road, where the enemy had advanced, and drove them back in gallant style, holding our original line of pickets. General Armistead's troops, pushing back the enemy, resumed our line of pickets from Colonel Rutledge's left to the railroad. General Wright brought forward the First Louisiana Regiment and the Twenty-second Georgia to the support of the Fourth Georgia, and drove the enemy back; in doing which our loss was considerable, especially in the First Louisiana Regiment, as shown by the list of casualties herewith appended.(*) Our pickets were relieved by regiments of General Ransom's brigade, and most of them, composed of new troops, behaved with great steadiness and coolness in this their first conflict with the enemy.

Late in the evening we pushed the enemy on our right to recover the ground lost in the morning. This was accomplished by the Fourth Georgia Regiment, supported by Colonel [Robert C.] Hill's regiment, of Ransom's brigade (Forty-eighth North Carolina). Brigadier-General Mahone had sent Grimes' battery to a position near French's house, and it was well served against the enemy. He also moved a portion of his brigade so as to protect the right of General Wright's line. The Forty-ninth Virginia, Col. William Smith, supported by the Forty-first Virginia Regiment, were so placed as to flank the enemy on their left as they advanced on Colonel Hill. Their fire assisted greatly in repulsing the enemy. I inclose the reports of Generals Mahone and Wright. General Armistead's whole force was engaged on our left, and by evening they had fully recovered our original picket line. General Wright reports the handsome manner in which a portion of Capt. Frank Huger's battery drove off the pieces the enemy had advanced down the Williamsburg road and with which he kept up a fire on our whole line until driven off by our guns, which were afterward advanced to the position held by the enemy and fired into his camps.

The brigade of Brigadier-General Walker reported to me on the 26th and was held in reserve as a support, but was next morning, by your instructions, sent elsewhere. The troops which were in my rear all moved off during the night of the 25th or morning of the 26th to commence that series of brilliant actions which began on the enemy's right. My division alone remained between the enemy and Richmond on this approach.

During June 26, 27, and 28 we pushed forward our scouts and advanced to the abatis around the enemy's works, but found them in force; and similar reconnaissances made by Generals Magruder and McLaws, with whom I was in communication, indicated that the force in our front was not reduced by the operations taking place on our left.

On Saturday, June 28, the enemy kept quiet and we suspected they were retiring. The pickets heard wagons moving off during that night. I ordered the pickets to advance and push scouts up at daylight Sunday morning to give information. No report coming from them, after sunrise I rode forward to the advanced pickets and met Colonel Doles, of the Fourth Georgia, who had just come to the conclusion that the enemy had left and a white flag was shown from the works. With a company of the Fourth Georgia Regiment I rode forward with one aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Sloan, and entered the works. A few men, who represented themselves left as hospital attendants, were the only persons there. The tents were left standing, cut, and I was informed a surgeon was left with [the] sick. I rode on and found him and read his order, and directed him to remain with the sick and he would not be considered a prisoner of war.

By this time all the regiments on picket duty had marched up to the works. I rode along the lines, announced to them the enemy had left, and we were ordered to follow them down the Charles City road. General Wright had joined me, and he and the other brigadiers were ordered to get ready to march at once and move over to the Charles City road. General Mahone, who was on that road, was ordered to move down it, General Armistead to follow him, Generals Wright and Ransom to follow.

Soon after Generals Wright and Ransom got their brigades in motion a message was received from General Magruder, at Fair Oaks Station, that the enemy were advancing on him in force and asking me to support him with two brigades. Ransom's brigade was at once recalled and I marched with it back to the Seven Pines. Wright's brigade was ordered back.

The day was intensely hot and this marching and counter-marching exhausted the men. I met General Magruder, who insisted the enemy were advancing in great force, and he desired my assistance, asking me to form line of battle, left on railroad and right at Seven Pines. I had commenced moving the troops into position when I saw a line in my front, and inquiring what troops they were, was informed it was McLaws' division.

At the same moment I received a dispatch from General Lee, whom I left at my late headquarters, saying it was very important I should proceed at once down the Charles City road, and, if my assistance was not necessary to General Magruder, to move on. As the enemy had abandoned their works and retired I could not conceive their attack was a serious one, but the demonstration was only to delay us, and as General McLaws occupied the ground I might leave, and sent a message to General Magruder that under my orders I had decided it was not necessary for me to stay. I had halted General Wright near French's house, and I sent him orders to resume his march to the Charles City road, and General Ransom was sent off in the same direction at once.

[end of extensive excerpt]
As the different brigades of my division were sent forward into the battle at Malvern Hill, and I was directed to report them to another commander, though present myself, I was not in command during this battle. As! was treated in the same manner at Seven Pines, I can only hope this course was accidental and required by the necessities of the service. I therefore make no report, and I have to refer you to the subordinate reports, herewith transmitted, and to the reports of other commanders, for details of the action of Malvern Hill. After this battle, as required, the division was occupied, under my orders, in removing the wounded and burying the dead.

From my personal staff I received every assistance, and I beg to name Lieut. Col. S.S. Anderson, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. Benjamin Huger, assistant adjutant-general; Lieutenants Sloan and Preston, aides-de-camp; Lieuts. Willoughby Anderson (Engineers) and Thomas Pinckney, volunteer aides-de-camp, as officers who rendered important service, and to whom my thanks are especially due.

To Surg. E. N. Wood, medical director, and Maj. J. A. Johnston, quartermaster, I beg to call the attention of the general for the prompt care bestowed on the wounded and the transportation of them to the hospitals, &c.
I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,
BENJ. HUGER,
Major-General, Commanding Division.
General R. E. LEE,
Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.
-----
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 14 [S# 14]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VIRGINIA, FROM MARCH 17 TO SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#11
[extensive excerpt]
MAJ. GEN. D. H. HILL'S DIVISION.

Fifth Brigade.
Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY.
4th Georgia, Col. George Doles.

48th Georgia, Col. William Gibson.
1st North Carolina, Col. M. S. Stokes.
3d North Carolina, Col. G. Meares.
 

M E Wolf

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Location
Virginia
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/1 [S# 27]
SEPTEMBER 3-20, 1862.-The Maryland Campaign.
No. 204.--Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, commanding, during the Maryland Campaign.(+)
[extensive excerpt]

HILL'S DIVISION.(*)
Maj. Gen. DANIEL H. HILL.

Ripley's Brigade.
Brig. Gen. ROSWELL S. RIPLEY.

Col. GEORGE DOLES.
4th Georgia, Col. George Doles.

44th Georgia, Captain Key.
1st North Carolina, Lieut. Col. H.A. Brown.
3d North Carolina, Col. William L. De Rosset.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/1 [S# 27]
SEPTEMBER 3-20, 1862.-The Maryland Campaign.
No. 293.--Report of Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations July 23-September 17.


HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
------,1862.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the battles around Richmond until after the battle of Sharpsburg.

continued to next page due to length...
 

M E Wolf

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Location
Virginia
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/1 [S# 27]
SEPTEMBER 3-20, 1862.-The Maryland Campaign.
No. 293.--Report of Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations July 23-September 17.
HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
------,1862.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the battles around Richmond until after the battle of Sharpsburg.

On July 23, I was detached from my division and placed in charge of the Department of the South Side, extending from Drewry's Bluff to the South Carolina line. As McClellan was then at Westover, on the James, some 30 miles from Richmond, and it was thought that he might attempt an advance by the south side, my first attention was given to the defenses in that direction. Heavy details were made from the division and two brigades near the bluff, to complete a line of intrenchments around it, and controlling the Petersburg road. Not a spadefull of earth had been thrown up about Petersburg, and it was in a wholly defenseless condition. A system of fortifications was begun (which subsequently met the approval of the chief engineer, Col. J. F. Gilmer, C. S. Army), and the brigades of Ransom, Walker, and Daniel were put to work on it. About 1,000 negroes were procured (chiefly from North Carolina) and employed in like manner. Pontoon bridges were constructed at several points, to make the connection rapid and secure between the two positions to be secured. The defenses of the Appomattox were also strengthened, and a movable car planned and ordered, to prevent a landing at City Point. An effort was made to organize and make efficient the numerous independent companies in the department, which had been of but little use and much expense to the country. A
concentration of these troops at Weldon and Goldsborough was ordered, to prevent the cutting of our important lines southward.

[extensive excerpt]
An examination of the pass, very early on the morning of the 14th, satisfied me that it could only be held by a large force, and was wholly indefensible by a small one. I accordingly ordered up Anderson's brigade. A regiment of Ripley's brigade was sent to hold another pass, some 3 miles distant, on our left. I felt reluctant to order up Ripley and Rodes from the important positions they were holding until something definite was known of the strength and design of the Yankees. About 7 o'clock they opened a fire upon our right, and pushed forward a large force through the dense woods to gain a practicable road to our rear. Garland's brigade was sent in to meet this overwhelming force, and succeeded in checking it and securing the road from any further attack that day. This brilliant service, however, cost us the life of that pure, gallant, and accomplished Christian soldier, General Garland, who had no superiors and few equals in the service. The Yankees on their side lost General Reno, a renegade Virginian, who was killed by a happy shot from the Twenty-third North Carolina. Garland's brigade was badly demoralized by his fall and the rough handling it had received, and, had the Yankees pressed vigorously forward, the road might have been gained. Providentially, they were ignorant of their success or themselves too much damaged to advance. The Twentieth North Carolina of this brigade, under Colonel Iverson, had attacked a Yankee battery, killed all the horses, and driven off the cannoneers. This battery was used no more that day by the Yankees. Anderson's brigade arrived in time to take the place of the much-demoralized troops of Garland. There were two mountain roads practicable for artillery on the right of the main turnpike. The defense of the farther one had cost Garland his life.

It was now intrusted to Colonel [T. L.] Rosser, of the cavalry, who had reported to me, and who had artillery and dismounted sharpshooters. General Anderson was intrusted with the care of the nearest and best road. Bondurant's battery was sent to aid him in its defense. The brigade of Colquitt was disposed on each side of the turnpike, and that: with Lane's battery, was judged adequate to the task. There was, however, a solitary peak on the left, which, if gained by the Yankees, would give them control of the ridge commanding the turnpike. The possession of this peak was, therefore, everything to the Yankees, but they seemed slow to perceive it. I had a large number of guns from Cutts' artillery placed upon the hill on the left of the turnpike, to sweep the approaches to this peak. From the position selected, there was a full view of the country for miles around, but the mountain was so steep that ascending columns were but little exposed to artillery fire. The artillerists of [A. S.] Cutts' battalion behaved gallantly, but their firing was the worst I ever witnessed. Rodes and Ripley came up soon after Anderson. Rodes was sent to the left, to seize the peak already mentioned, and Ripley was sent to the right to support Anderson. Several attempts had been made previous to this, by the Yankees, to force a passage through the woods on the right of and near the turnpike, but these were repulsed by the Sixth and Twenty-seventh Georgia and Thirteenth Alabama, of Colquitt's brigade.

It was now past noon, and the Yankees had been checked for more than five hours; but it was evident that they were in large force on both sides of the road, and the Signal Corps reported heavy masses at the foot of the mountain. In answer to a dispatch from General Longstreet, I urged him to hurry forward troops to my assistance. General Drayton and Col. G. T. Anderson came up, I think, about 3 o'clock, with 1,900 men, and I felt anxious to beat the force on my right before the Yankees made their grand attack, which I feared would be on our left. Anderson, Ripley, and Drayton were called together, and I directed them to follow a path until they came in contact with Rosser, when they should change their flank, march into line of battle, and sweep the woods before them. To facilitate their movements, I brought up a battery and made it shell the woods in various directions. Anderson soon became partially and Drayton hotly engaged, but Ripley did not draw trigger; why, I do not know. The Fourth North Carolina (Anderson's brigade) attempted to carry a Yankee battery, but failed. Three Yankee brigades moved up, in beautiful order, against Drayton, and his men were soon beaten and went streaming to the rear. Rosser, Anderson, and Ripley still held their ground, and the Yankees could not gain our rear.

Affairs were now very serious on our left. A division of Yankees was advancing in handsome style against Rodes. I had every possible gun turned upon the Yankee columns, but, owing to the steepness of the acclivity and the bad handling of the guns, but little harm was done to the " restorers of the Union." Rodes handled his little brigade in a most admirable and gallant manner, fighting, for hours, vastly superior odds, and maintaining the key-points of the position until darkness rendered a further advance of the Yankees impossible. Had he fought with less obstinacy, a practicable artillery road to the rear would have been gained on our left and the line of retreat cut off.

[extensive excerpt - not germane to Col/B.G. Doles or Sharpsburg]

We retreated that night to Sharpsburg, having accomplished all that was required--the delay of the Yankee army until Harper's Ferry could not be relieved.

Should the truth ever be known, the battle of South Mountain, as far as my division was concerned, will be regarded as one of the most remarkable and creditable of the war. The division had marched all the way from Richmond, and the straggling had been enormous in consequence of heavy marches, deficient commissariat, want of shoes, and inefficient officers. Owing to these combined causes, the division numbered less than 5,000 men the morning of September 14, and had five roads to guard, extending over a space of as many miles. This small force successfully resisted, without support, for eight hours, the whole Yankee army, and, when its supports were beaten; still held the roads, so that our retreat was effected without the loss of a gun, a wagon, or an ambulance. Rodes' brigade had immortalized itself; Colquitt's had fought well, and the two regiments most closely pressed (Twenty-third and Twenty-eighth Georgia) had repulsed the foe. Garland's brigade had behaved nobly, until demoralized by the fall of its gallant leader, and being outflanked by the Yankees. Anderson's brigade had shown its wonted gallantry. Ripley's brigade, for some cause, had not been engaged, and was used with Hood's two brigades to cover the retreat.

Had Longstreet's division been with mine at daylight in the morning, the Yankees would have been disastrously repulsed; but they had gained important positions before the arrival of re-enforcements. These additional troops came up, after a long, hurried, and exhausting march, to defend localities of which they were ignorant, and to fight a foe flushed with partial success, and already holding key-points to further advance. Had our forces never been separated, the battle of Sharpsburg never would have been fought, and the Yankees would not have even the shadow of consolation for the loss of Harper's Ferry.

We reached Sharpsburg about daylight on the morning of the 15th. The Yankees made their appearance that day, and some skirmishing and cannonading occurred.

There was a great deal of artillery firing during the forenoon of the 16th, and late that afternoon the Yankees crossed the Antietam opposite the center of my line and made for the Hagerstown turnpike. Had we been in a condition to attack them as they crossed, much damage might have been inflicted; but as yet there were but two weak divisions on the ground. Longstreet held the position south of the Boonsborough turnpike, and I that on the right. Hood's command was placed on my left to guard the Hagerstown pike. Just before sundown I got up a battery (Lane's), of Cutts' battalion, to open upon the Yankee columns advancing toward that pike, while Col. Stephen D. Lee brought up another farther on the right. These checked the Yankee advance, and enabled Jackson to take position on Hood's left and covering any attempt to turn us in that direction.

My ranks had been diminished by some additional straggling, and the morning of the 17th I had but 3,000 infantry. I had, however, twenty-six pieces of artillery of my own and near fifty [?] pieces of Cutts' battalion, temporarily under my command. Positions were selected for as many of these guns as could be used; but all the ground in my front was completely commanded by the long-range artillery of the Yankees on the other side of the Antietam, which concentrated their fire upon every gun that opened and soon disabled or silenced it.

t daylight a brisk skirmish began along Hood's front, and Colquitt, Ripley, and McRae (commanding Garland's brigade) were moved up to his support. Hood's men always right well, and they were handsomely supported by Colquitt and Ripley. The first line of the Yankees was broken, and our men pushed vigorously forward, but to meet another, and yet another, line. Colquitt had gone in with 10 field officers; 4 were killed, 5 badly wounded, and the tenth had been stunned by a shell. The men were beginning to fall back, and efforts were made to rally them in the bed of an old road, nearly at right angles to the Hagerstown pike, and which had been their position previous to the advance. These efforts, however, were only partially successful. Most of the brigade took no further part in the action. Garland's brigade (Colonel McRae commanding) had been much demoralized by the fight at South Mountain, but the men advanced with alacrity, secured a good position, and were fighting bravely when Captain [T. P.] Thomson, Fifth North Carolina, cried out, "They are flanking us." This cry spread like an electric shock along the ranks, bringing up vivid recollections of the flank fire at South Mountain. In a moment they broke and fell to the rear. Colonel McRae, though wounded, remained on the field all day and succeeded in gathering up some stragglers, and personally rendered much efficient service. The Twenty-third North Carolina Regiment, of this brigade, was brought off by the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Johnston, and posted, by my order, in the old road already described. Ripley's brigade had united with Walker's and fallen back with it behind the ridge to the left of this road and near to it. We had now lost all the ground wrested from the enemy, and were occupying the position held in the morning. But three of my brigades had been broken and much demoralized, and all of the artillery had been withdrawn from my front. Rodes and Anderson were in the old road, and some stragglers had been gathered up and placed upon their left.

It was now apparent that the Yankees were massing in our front, and that their grand attack would be made upon my position, which was the center of our line. I sent several urgent messages to General Lee for re-enforcements, but before any arrived a heavy force (since ascertained to be Franklin's corps) advanced in three parallel lines, with all the precision of a parade day, upon my two brigades. They met with a galling fire, however, recoiled, and fell back; again advanced, and again fell back, and finally lay down behind the crest of the hill and kept up an irregular fire. I got a battery in position, which partially enfiladed the Yankee line and aided materially to check its advance. This battery was brought up by my aide, Lieut. J. A. Reid, who received a painful wound in the discharge of that duty.

[extensive excerpt]
The battle of Sharpsburg was a success so far as the failure of the Yankees to carry the position they assailed. It would, however, have been a glorious victory for us but for three causes:

First. The separation of our forces. Had McLaws and R. H. Anderson been there earlier in the morning, the battle would not have lasted two hours, and would have been signally disastrous to the Yankees.

Second. The bad handling of our artillery. This could not cope with the superior weight, caliber, range, and number of the Yankee guns; hence it ought only to have been used against masses of infantry. On the contrary, our guns were made to reply to the Yankee guns, and were smashed up or withdrawn before they could be effectually turned against massive columns of attack. An artillery duel between the Washington Artillery and the Yankee batteries across the Antietam on the 16th was the most melancholy farce in the war.

Third. The enormous straggling. The battle was fought with less than 30,000 men. Had all our stragglers been up, McClellan's army would have been completely crushed or annihilated. Doubtless the want of shoes, the want of food, and physical exhaustion had kept many brave men from being with the army; but thousands of thieving poltroons had kept away from sheer cowardice. The straggler is generally a thief and always a coward, lost to all sense of shame; he can only be kept in ranks by a strict and sanguinary discipline.
List of casualties.
Command Killed. Wounded. Missing.
Rodes' brigade 111 289 225
Ripley's brigade 110 506 124
Garland's brigade 46 210 187
Anderson's brigade 64 299 202
Colquitt's brigade 129 518 184
Artillery 4 30 3
Total 464 1,852 925

In this sad list we have specially to mourn many distinguished officers. Brigadier-General Garland was killed at South Mountain--the most fearless man I ever knew, a Christian hero, a ripe scholar, and most accomplished gentleman. Brig. Gen. G. B. Anderson was mortally wounded at Sharpsburg--a high-toned, honorable, conscientious Christian soldier, highly gifted, and lovely in all the qualities that adorn a man. Col. C. C. Tew, Second North Carolina Regiment, was one of the most finished scholars on the continent, and had no superior as a soldier in the field. Col. B. B. Gayle, Twelfth Alabama, a most gallant and accomplished officer, was killed at South Mountain. Col. W. P. Barclay, Twenty-third Georgia, the hero of South Mountain, was killed at Sharpsburg. There, too, fell those gallant Christian soldiers, Col. Levi B. Smith, Twenty-seventh Georgia, and Lieut. Col. J. M. Newton, of the Sixth Georgia. The modest and heroic Major [P.] Tracy, of the Sixth Georgia, met there, too, a bloody grave. The lamented Captain [W. F.] Plane, of that regiment, deserves a special mention. Of him it could be truly said that he shrank from no danger, no fatigue, and no exposure. Maj. Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, fell, fighting most heroically, at Sharpsburg. He had received a military education, and gave promise of eminence in his profession. Capt. James B. Atwell, Twentieth North Carolina, deserves to live in the memory of his countrymen for almost unsurpassed gallantry. After having greatly distinguished himself in the capture of the Yankee battery at South Mountain, he fell, heroically fighting, at Sharpsburg. Brigadier-General Ripley received a severe wound in the throat from a Minie-ball, which would have proven fatal but for passing through his cravat. After his wound was dressed, he heroically returned to the field, and remained to the close of the day with his brigade. Brigadier-General Rodes received a painful contusion from a shell, but remained with his command. Colonel McRae, commanding brigade, was struck in the forehead, but gallantly remained on the field. Colonel Bennett, Fourteenth North Carolina Regiment, who had conducted himself most nobly throughout, won my special admiration for the heroism he exhibited at the moment of receiving what he supposed to be a mortal wound. Colonel [W. L.] De Rosset, Third North Carolina, received a severe wound at Sharpsburg, which I fear will forever deprive the South of his most valuable services. Col. F. M. Parker, Thirtieth North Carolina, a modest, brave, and accomplished officer, was severely wounded at Sharpsburg. Col. J. B. Gordon, Sixth Alabama, the Chevalier Bayard of the army, received five wounds at Sharpsburg before he would quit the field. The heroic Colonel lB. D.] Fry, Thirteenth Alabama, and Colonel [E. A.] O'Neal, Twenty-sixth Alabama, who had both been wounded at Seven Pines, were once more wounded severely, at Sharpsburg, while nobly doing their duty. Lieutenant-Colonel [S. B.] Pickens, Twelfth Alabama, and Major [R. D.] Redden, Twenty-sixth Alabama, were both wounded at South Mountain, the former severely. They greatly distinguished themselves in that battle. Lieut. Col. J. N. Lightfoot, Sixth Alabama, and Lieutenant-Colonel [William A.] Johnston, Fourteenth North Carolina, were wounded at Sharpsburg, the latter slightly. Major [S. I).] Thruston, Third North Carolina, received a painful contusion, but did not leave the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Ruffin, Thirteenth North Carolina, remained with his regiment on South Mountain after receiving three painful wounds. Lieutenant-Colonel [W. H.] Betts, Thirteenth Alabama, was slightly wounded. Lieutenant Colonel [C. T.] Zachry, Twenty-seventh Georgia, had just recovered from a severe wound before Richmond to receive a more serious one at Sharpsburg. Lieutenant-Colonel [E. F.] Best and Major [J. H.] Huggins, Twenty-third Georgia, gallant and meritorious officers, were severely wounded at Sharpsburg.

It becomes my grateful task to speak in the highest terms of my brigade commanders, two of whom sealed their devotion to their country with their lives. Major [J. W.] Ratchford, Major Pierson, chief of artillery, and Lieut. J. A. Reid, of my staff; were conspicuous for their gallantry. Captain Overton, serving temporarily with me, was wounded at Sharpsburg, but remained under fire until I urged him to leave the field. Captain West and Lieut. T. J. Moore, ordnance officers, discharged faithfully their duty and rendered important service on the field at South Mountain. Maj. Archer Anderson, adjutant, had been wounded in crossing the Potomac, and I lost his valuable services in Maryland. Sergeant Harmeling and Privates Thomas Jones and Minter, of the couriers, acquitted themselves handsomely.

Brigadier-General Redes reports as specially deserving notice for their gallantry, Colonel O'Neal and Major Redden, Twenty-sixth Alabama; Col. J. B. Gordon, Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, Lieut. P. H. Larey, Sergt. J. B. Hancock, Sixth Alabama; Maj. E. L. Hobson, Capt. T. M. Riley, Lieut. J. M. Goff, Sergt. A. Swicegood, Color-Corpl. Joshua Smith, Fifth Alabama; Col. C. A. Battle, Capt. E. S. Ready (badly wounded), Lieuts. J. J. Lake (killed) and E. T. Randall (wounded), Sergts. N. M, Howard, William Taylor, J. W. Hauxthall, James Stewart, Henry Donnelson, and George Ellison, Corpl. Josiah Ely, and Privates Joseph Lee and Hollanquist, Third Alabama.

Brigadier-General Colquitt reports in like manner N. B. Neusan, Color-Sergt. J. J. Powell, W. W. Glover, H. M. James, and N. B. Lane, colorguard Sixth Georgia; Corpls. John Cooper, Joseph J. Wood, Privates J. W. Tompkins, B.C. Lapsade, L. B. Hannah, A.D. Simmons, W. Smith, J. M. Feltman, and J. C. Penn. Captain [W. M.] Arnold, Sixth Georgia, who commanded a battalion of skirmishers at South Mountain and Sharpsburg, is entitled to the highest commendation for his skill and gallantry. Captain [N. J.] Garrison, commanding Twenty-eighth Georgia, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment. Captain [James W.]Banning, Twenty-eighth Georgia Regiment, was distinguished for his intrepid coolness, fighting in the ranks, with gun in hand, and stimulating his men by his words and examples. W.R. Johnson and William Goff, Twenty-eighth Georgia; Lieuts. B. A. Bowen, R. S. Tomme, and L. D. Ford, First Sergeant Herring, Sergts. J. L. Moore, T. P. W. Bullard, and J. J. Adams, Corpl. J. A. Lee, and Privates W. A. Estes, J. S. Wingate, W. S. Walker, Isaac Hundley, Thomas Sudler, J. J. Gordon, Simeon Williamson, Mosely, McCall, J. M. Vanse, J. Hutchings. Thomas Argo, J. S. Dennis, W. J. Claybanks, Joseph Herron, and W. D. Tingle, Thirteenth Alabama.

The officers commanding the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Georgia Regiments report that it is impossible for them to make distinctions where so many acted with distinguished bravery. In the Twenty-seventh every commissioned officer except one was killed or wounded at Sharpsburg, and this sole survivor was unwilling to discriminate among so many brave men.

Brigadier-General Doles (now commanding Ripley's brigade) pays a tribute to the memory of Maj. Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, and speaks in the most complimentary terms of Colonel De Rosset and Major Thruston, Third North Carolina(the former severely and the latter slightly wounded), and Captains [E.G.] Meares, [Lieutenant D. E.] McNair, and [D.] Williams, of the same regiment. Lieut. Col. H. A. Brown and Capt. J. N. Harrell, acting major of the First North Carolina Regiment, are also highly commended. Lieut. Col. Phil. Cook, Captains [W. H.] Willis, [F. H.] DeGraffenried, and Lieutenants [E. A.] Hawkins, [R. M.] Bisel, [W. W.] Hulbert, [J. T.] Gay (wounded), [J. G.] Stephens, [C. R.] Ezell, [F. T.] Snead, [L. M.] Cobb (killed), [J. C.] Macon (severely wounded), "all commended themselves to my special notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct." Captain [John C.] Key, commanding Forty-fourth Georgia, and Captain Read, assistant adjutant-general, are equally commended. Asst. Surg. William P. Young remained on the field after he was wounded, caring for the wounded, and fell into the hands of the enemy. Privates Thomas S. Cartright, Joseph L. Richardson, and Henry E. Welch, Fourth Georgia, are mentioned with distinction. The first-named fell with the colors of his regiment in his hand; Richardson was wounded. Privates R. Dudley Hill and Thomas J. Dingier, two lads in the Forty-fourth Georgia, attracted, in an especial manner, the attention of their commander by their extraordinary daring. Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, of the First North Carolina Regiment, who commanded in both battles in Maryland, says that all did their duty in his regiment, and he cannot discriminate.

[extensive excerpt - not germane to Doles or 4th Georgia]

Respectfully submitted.
D. H. HILL,
Major-General.
Gen. R. H. CHILTON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
 
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/1 [S# 27]
SEPTEMBER 3-20, 1862.-The Maryland Campaign.
No. 295.--Report of Brig. Gen. Roswell S. Ripley, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of the battles of Boonsborough and Sharpsburg.

HEADQUARTERS RIPLEY'S BRIGADE,
Camp on Opequon Creek, September 21, 1862.
MAJOR: On the evening of September 13 I received orders from Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill to march with my brigade and take a position with it and a battery of artillery on the eminence immediately on the northeast of Boonsborough, and to send a regiment at daylight on the following morning to occupy the Hamburg Pass. This was accomplished, and on the following morning, at an early hour, Colonel [George] Doles, with the Fourth Georgia Regiment, was in position at the pass.

At about 9 o'clock I received orders to send forward my artillery, and, soon after, to move with the whole force to the main pass east of Boonsborough. Upon arriving, I was directed to follow the road leading to Braddock's Gap, and place myself in communication with Brigadier-General Anderson, who had preceded me in that direction. Upon coming up and communicating with that officer, it was arranged that he should extend along the Braddock road and make room for the troops of my command, and that an attack should be made upon the enemy, then occupying the heights to the south. While taking position, General Hill arrived, and with him Brigadier-General Drayton's command. General Hill directed General Anderson's and my command to extend still farther on the road, making room for General Drayton's troops, and that the attack should be made as soon as all were in position. General Anderson's and my own brigade got into position on the road, and General Drayton's command was rapidly forming when the action commenced by the enemy attacking him in force. This he sustained for some time, General Anderson's and my own brigade pushing forward through dense thickets and up very steep acclivities to outflank the enemy and come into General Drayton's support. The natural difficulties of the ground and the condition of the troops prevented these movements being made with the rapidity which was desirable, and the enemy forced his way to the Braddock road between General Drayton's force and my own, and sent a column of troops down the road as if to cut off the troops forming our right. In this object he was thwarted by two pieces of artillery belonging to Colonel Rosser's cavalry, which was speedily placed in position a short distance in our rear on the Braddock road. A few well-directed shot and shell drove the enemy up the hill, leaving the road in our possession.

Meantime General Anderson had extended far to the right and come up with the enemy, with whom he had a short engagement. My own brigade had pressed up to within a short distance of the crest of the heights, and held its position under a noisy but comparatively harmless fire, but Anderson's brigade having extended far to the right, it was for the time unsupported by any other troops. Soon after, Brigadier-General Hood's command came from the main pass, and, forming upon my left, the troops pressed up the road, driving the enemy before them until they occupied their first position and darkness put an end to the operations. I found soon afterward that General Anderson's command had been withdrawn at nightfall from the heights to the Braddock road.

Orders were received from Major-General Longstreet to renew the attack as early as practicable, and arrangements were in progress when further orders were received to move back to the main road and follow the army. The movement was made without confusion, and upon coming on the road near Boonsborough the route was taken following the main army to Sharpsburg.

Upon arriving on the west bank of the Antietam River, on the 15th, under orders from Major-General Longstreet (during the temporary absence of the division commander), I posted my own, Anderson's, and McRae's brigades on the heights overlooking the river, with the right resting on the road from Boonsborough to Sharpsburg, facing the river. The troops bivouacked during the remainder of the 15th and the 16th in this position.

On the morning of the 16th the enemy made his appearance in force in our front, and from about 9 o'clock until nightfall we were subjected to an annoying artillery fire

During the evening I received orders to move my brigade to the left of our division, and take up a position to cover a road leading from our left to the turnpike leading from Sharpsburg to Hagerstown, and in support of certain batteries of artillery in our vicinity. The troops rested on their arms during the night of the 16th.

Early on the morning of the 17th, the skirmishers of Colonel Walker's brigade, of Jackson's corps, immediately on my left, became engaged, and the enemy from his batteries on the eastern bank of the Antietam opened a severe enfilading fire on the troops of my command, the position which we had been ordered to occupy being in full view of nearly all of his batteries. This fire inflicted serious loss before the troops were called into positive action, the men lying under it, without flinching, for over an hour, while the enemy plied his guns unceasingly. During this while, a set of farm buildings in our front were set on fire to prevent them being made use of by the enemy.

At about 8 o'clock I received orders to close in to my left and advance. The troops sprung to their arms with alacrity and moved forward through the burning buildings in our front, reformed on the other side, and opened a rapid fire upon the enemy.

While engaged in reforming the brigade, I received a shot in the neck, which disabled me, and the troops moved forward under command of Colonel Doles, of the Fourth Georgia Regiment. After an absence of an hour and a half, I returned to the field with such force as I could collect from detachments, and found my brigade relieved and in position to the west of Sharpsburg. I remained with it until the afternoon, when, finding myself faint and exhausted, I relinquished the command to Colonel Doles, to whose report I must refer for the operations of the brigade while under his command.

I noticed the gallant and efficient conduct of officers and men, which in many instances was admirable, especially in consideration of the hardships to which they had been subjected, many having been without food for twenty-four and some for forty eight hours.

The commanding officers of regiments--Colonel Doles, of the Fourth Georgia; Colonel [William L.] De Rosset, of the Third North Carolina (severely wounded); Lieutenant Colonel [Hamilton A.] Brown, of the First North Carolina, and Captain Key, of the Forty-fourth Georgia--all led their troops gallantly. They were ably seconded by their respect-ire field officers, and I concur in the remarks of the regimental commanders concerning their various officers.

Capt. B. H. Read and Lieut. H. H. Rogers, acting on my staff, rendered, throughout the operations, valuable and efficient service. Captain Read remained on the field after I had been disabled. Lieutenant Rogers was severely wounded while in the discharge of his duties.

The return of killed, wounded, and missing will be forwarded with the report of Colonel Doles, upon whom the command of the brigade will devolve during my absence.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
R. S. RIPLEY,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.


Maj. ARCHER ANDERSON,
Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.
 
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/2 [S# 28]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From September 3 To November 14, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#5
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,
October 27, 1862.
Hon. GEORGE W. RANDOLPH.
Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.
:
SIR: In answer to the dispatch of General Cooper and to your letter of 26th instant, I have the honor to state, for the information of the President, that General Longstreet's corps is composed of five divisions.
1st. McLaws' division of five brigades: Drayton's, Evans', Cobb's, Kershaw's, and Semmes'.
2d. R. H. Anderson's division of five brigades: Wilcox's, Mahone's, Wright's, Featherston's, and Barksdale's.
3d. Pickett's division of five brigades: Pryor's, Armistead's, Kemper's, Jenkins', and Pickett's.
4th. Hood's division of four brigades: D. R. Jones', Toorobs', Whiting's, and Hood's.
5th. Walker's division of two brigades: Walker's and Ransom's.
1st. The organizations of McLaws' division is complete, the brigade commanders all present except Brig. Gen. Howell Cobb, who is absent on duty, and will soon return.
2d. In Anderson's division, Maj. Gen. R. H. Anderson is absent wounded, but is expected soon to return to duty. Wilcox is in command of the division; Mahone and Wright are absent, wounded; Featherston absent, sick; Garnett commands Mahone's brigade; Wright is expected soon to return, and Colonel Posey is recommended for promotion, to command Featherston's brigade.
3d. Brig. Gen. G. E. Pickett is recommended to be promoted major-general, to command the Third (Pickett's) Division, and Col. M.D. Corse is recommended to be promoted brigadier-general, to command Pickett's brigade. The other brigade commanders are present, except Jenkins, who is expected soon to return.
4th. Brig. Gen. J. B. Hood is recommended to be promoted major-general, to command Hood's division, and Col. J. B. Robertson, Fifth Texas, is recommended to be promoted brigadier-general, to command Hood's brigade. Col. G. T. Anderson, who has been in command of D. R. Jones' brigade, is recommended to be promoted to its command. Col. E. M. Law, who has been promoted brigadier-general, is in command of Whiting's brigade, and, should it be deemed expedient to supply the place of Brig. Gen. R. Toombs, absent, wounded, I recommend Col. T. R. R. Cobb to be promoted to the command of his brigade.
5th. I recommend Col. J. R. Cooke to be promoted to command Walker's brigade, General Walker commanding the division.
The above promotions will, if made, complete the organization of General Longstreet's corps.

[extensive excerpt- not germane to Colonel/Brig. Gen. Doles]

3d. I recommend Colonel Doles, Fourth Georgia Regiment, to be promoted brigadier-general in the place of Brigadier-General Ripley, detached, and Col. S. D. Ramseur, of the Forty-ninth North Carolina Volunteers, to be promoted to the command of Brig. Gen. G. B. Anderson, deceased. Col. J. B. Gordon, of the Sixth Alabama, is recommended to be promoted brigadier-general, to command Rains' brigade. Col. Alfred Iverson, TwentiethNorth Carolina Regiment, is recommended to be promoted to the command of Brigadier-General Garland, killed in battle.

[extensive excerpt]

These promotions, if made, will complete the organization of General Jackson's command. The recommendations of artillery officers will be sent as soon as they can be given.
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
R. E. LEE,
General.
-----
 

M E Wolf

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/2 [S# 28]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From September 3 To November 14, 1862.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#5
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 234.
HDQRS. ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,
November 6, 1862.
I. Col. S. D. Lee, commanding artillery battalion, will immediately repair to Richmond, Va., and report to the Adjutant and Inspector General, C. S. Army. Brig. Gen. W. N. Pendleton, chief of artillery, will assign an officer to relieve Col. S. D. Lee.
II. Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans will proceed with his brigade to Weldon, N. C., reporting, when passing through Richmond, to Maj. Gen. G. W. Smith.
* * * * * * * * * *
VIII. The following promotions, having been made by the President, are announced accordingly, and officers assigned to duty as follows:
Maj. Gen. James Longstreet to be lieutenant-general, and to command First Army Corps.
Maj. Gen. T. J. Jackson to be lieutenant-general, and to command Second Army Corps.
Promotions and assignments in the First Corps are: Brig. Gen. G. E. Pickett to be major-general, and to continue in command of his present division; Brig Gen. J. B. Hood to be major-general, and to continue in command of his present division; Col. M.D. Corse, Seventeenth Virginia Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command Pickett's brigade; Col. T. R. R. Cobb, Georgia Legion, to be brigadier-general, to command Cobb's brigade; Col. J. B. Robertson, Fifth Texas, to be brigadier-general, to command Hood's brigade; Col. G. T. Anderson, Eleventh Georgia Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command D. R. Jones' brigadier Col. J. R. Cooke, [Twenty-seventh] North Carolina Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command J. G. Walker's brigade.

Those of the Second Corps are: Col. George Doles, Fourth Georgia Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command Ripley's brigade; Col. S. D. Ramseur, Forty-ninth North Carolina Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command G. B. Anderson's brigade; Col. Alfred Iverson, Twentieth North Carolina, to be brigadier-general to command Garland's brigade; Col. J. H. Lane, Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command Branch's brigade; Col. E. L. Thomas, Thirty-fifth Georgia Regiment, to be brigadier-general, to command J. R. Anderson's brigade; Maj. E. F. Paxton, assistant adju-tant-general, to be brigadier-general, to command Winder's brigade.

These officers will report for further orders to the lieutenant-general in command of their respective army corps.
* * * * * * * * * *
By command of General R. E. Lee:
A. P. MASON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
 
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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania From November 15, 1862, To January 26, 1863.
CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#
D. H. HILL'S DIVISION.
Maj. Gen. D. H. HILL.
Second Brigade.
Brig. Gen. GEORGE DOLES
.
4th Georgia, Col. Philip Cook.
44th Georgia, Col. John B. Estes.
1st North Carolina, Col. John A. McDowell.
3d North Carolina, Col. William L. De Rosset.
======================================

Geo. Doles was submitting reports long after it seems as one appears for him:
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 378.--Report of Brig. Gen. George Doles, C. S. Army, commanding briga

He was alive through Gettysburg...

Name DOLES, George Pierce
Born May 14 1830, Milledgeville GA
Died June 2 1864, Bethesda Church VA
Pre-War Profession Businessman, Capt. of Baldwin Blues militia co.
War Service 1861 Capt. in 4th Georgia, May 1861 Col., Malvern Hill (w), South Mountain, Sharpsburg, November 1862 Brig. Gen., commanded Doles’ Bde/D H Hill’s Divn at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, commanded Doles’ Bde/Rodes’ Divn at Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor (k).
Notes His brigade recaptured the Mule Shoe at Spotsylvania.

So....the report he personally made on Sharpsburg is missing and didn't make it to the first 128 reports in the Official Records of the Rebellion. Reading the other reports of his superiors, his actions weren't outstanding enough perhaps to make the first cut to make it into the first 128 volumes or, the original report and copies within the Brigade/Regiment never made it.... End of my search.
 

rpkennedy

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I did a search just for the term "Doles" in the ORs and there isn't anything by him for Antietam, just about him and Ripley's reference to his report.

R
 

M E Wolf

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Confederate Military History, Vol. 6
BIOGRAPHICAL.
Brigadier-General Philip Cook was born July 30, 1817, on his father's farm in Twigg county, Ga. He attended the old-field schools of his county, at the age of fifteen entered the academy of Milton Wilder, at Jeffersonville, and afterward was a student at Forsyth, Ga., until 1836, when he adventurously enlisted in Capt. W. A. Black's company, one of the five raised for the Seminole war. He was in that part of General Scott's command that rescued General Gaines when surrounded by the Seminoles. At the expiration of his term of enlistment he entered Oglethorpe university, Baldwin county, and after three years entered the university of Virginia, which he attended until 1841, when he returned home on account of his father's death. He practiced law at Forsyth three years and then moved to Oglethorpe, where he resided until 1861. Being an honorary member of the Macon county volunteers, he went with that company when it responded to Governor Brown's call, and with nineteen other companies was mustered into service at Augusta, Ga., in May, 1861. They were sent to Portsmouth, Va., and his company was assigned to the Fourth Georgia infantry. Private Cook was then appointed adjutant of the regiment, and he served as such until after the Seven Days' battles
around Richmond, when he was, upon the unanimous recommendation of the officers of the regiment, commissioned lieutenant-colonel. He was painfully wounded at Malvern Hill by the fragment of a shell. After the campaigns of Second Manassas and Sharpsburg he was commissioned colonel, November 1, 1862. He commanded his regiment at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, in the latter battle receiving a wound in the leg by a minie ball which disabled him for three months. During this period. he was in hospital at Richmond and subsequently at his home, and was elected to the State senate, in which he served forty days. Upon recovery he rejoined his command at Orange Court House. He returned to Georgia to serve out his term in the senate during the session of 1864, and then went back to the army. Upon the death of General Doles at Cold Harbor,
Colonel Cook was promoted to brigadier-general, his commission bearing date August 5, 1864.
He was in Early's Valley campaign, at the close of which he went down to Petersburg, where he was wounded in the right elbow and captured. He lay in the Petersburg hospital until July 30, 1865. Upon his recovery he returned to Oglethorpe, Ga., resumed his law practice, and in 1870 removed to Americus, where he practiced for ten years. He then withdrew from his profession and retired to his farm. In 1882 he was appointed by Governor McDaniel, one of five commissioners to superintend the erection of the present State capitol. The appropriation for the erection of this building was $1,000,000. Out of this, $20,000 was paid for a portion of the site, and when the building was completed, the commissioners returned to the treasury $118.50. General Cook then returned to his farm, where he remained until 1890, when Gov. John B. Gordon appointed him secretary of state to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Maj. M. C. Barnett. To the same office General Cook was elected in 1890 and 1892. He was elected to the Thirty-seventh Congress, but was denied his seat.
In 1872 he was elected to the Forty-second Congress from the Third district, and was returned three times, serving until 1882. General Cook died at Atlanta, May 22, 1894, at the home of his daughter Lucy, wife of W. L. Peel.
=======================================================
Brigadier-General George Pierce Doles was born in Milledgeville, Ga., May 14, 1830, and was educated in the schools of his native city. Until the opening of the civil war he was an active business man and quiet citizen of Milledgeville, where he was highly esteemed for his integrity and many good qualities of head and heart. Being somewhat fond of military affairs, he was for some time a member of the Baldwin Blues, one of the crack companies of Milledgeville, and in 1861 its captain. When it was certain that there would be war, he and his command offered themselves to Governor Brown, were accepted, and in May assigned to the Fourth Georgia regiment and ordered to Virginia. Of this regiment Doles was made colonel, May 8, 1861. They were, during the first year of the war, stationed near Norfolk, Va., anxious to get into a battle and very uneasy lest the war should end before they could get a chance at the enemy. There were many others in the Confederacy who felt the same way, not in a spirit of bluster or bravado, but because they were really eager to serve their country and to prove their devotion to the cause of the South. When 1862, the year of battles, opened, Doles and his brave men soon found plenty to do. Those who followed the fortunes of the army of Northern Virginia lacked no hardship or danger, and had a wide field on which to manifest the qualities of heroes. Well did Doles and his Georgians stand this test; they were never found lacking on any field. Gen. R. S. Ripley, in his report of the battles of South Mountain and Sharpsburg, speaks of the gallantry of Doles and his officers and soldiers. Gen. D. H. Hill, in his report of the battle of Fredericksburg, alludes to Doles as a "tried veteran and brigade commander," under whose leadership "the men always do well." On November 2, 1862, Doles was commissioned brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate States. At Chancellorsville and Gettysburg he led his brigade in such a manner as to receive the plaudits of his division commander. At length 1864 came, of which, so far as the main armies were concerned, it may be said it was not like 1862, a "year of battles," but a continuous battle with unremitting slaughter. For the armies of Northern Virginia and Tennessee there was hardly an intermission. During this year especially the endurance and steady valor of the American soldier were shown in a manner that astonished the world and won its admiration. Pressed on every side by the overwhelming numbers and bountiful resources of their powerful adversary., there were few Confederate soldiers who lacked steady employment near the flashing of the guns. Part of the time during the Overland campaign, Doles was in command of a division; and, had he lived, beyond doubt he would have won a major-general's commission before the close of 1864. But on the 2d of June, at Bethesda church, this gallant soldier offered up the life which had from the very first sound of arms been devoted to his country. His loss was sadly felt by the gallant men whom he had led, and by whom he was fondly loved, and in his native city, where he was known as a modest gentleman and earnest Christian, his death was deeply deplored.
 
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M E Wolf

Colonel
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Feb 9, 2008
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Confederate Military History, Vol. 6
CHAPTER II.
The organization of the Fourth Georgia volunteers was completed April 26, 1861, as follows: Col. George Doles; Lieut.-Col. John J. Matthews; Maj. Charles L. Whitehead; Adjt. Philip Cook; Commissary J. B. Morgan; Quartermaster H. R. Daniels; Capts. B. Cusley (A), Robert S. Smith (B), E. A. Nash (C), George F. Todd (D), J. G. Rust (E), B. R. Mayer (F), George F. · Bartlett (G), Samuel M. Prothro (H), William L. Johnson (I), D. R. E. Winn (K). This regiment served through the war in the army of Northern Virginia, and enjoyed the distinction of giving two brigadier-generals to the Confederate army. Its first colonel, George Doles, became brigadier-general and was killed at Second Cold Harbor. He was succeeded as colonel by Philip Cook, who also became a brigadier-general. There were many other changes in the regiment. Colonel Cook was succeeded by William H. Willis; Lieut. -Col. John J. Matthews by W. T. Gordon, Philip Cook (afterward colonel and then brigadier-general) and David R. E. Winn. Maj. Charles L. Whitehead was followed by William F. Jordan, David R. E. Winn, R. S. Smith, Edwin A. Nash, F. H. DeGraffenreid and Wm. H. Willis. When Philip Cook was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, A. J. Roberts became adjutant. Commissary J. B. Morgan was followed by James F. Murphey, and Quartermaster H. R. Daniels by Wm. H. Tinsley. There were also many changes among the captains. Cusley was followed by J. P. Strickland and James H. Weeks; Smith by M. H. Hill and A. C. Gibson; Nash by George F. Todd (died) and A. C. Frost;Rust by Wm. E. Smith and F. H. DeGraffen-reid; Mayer by George S. Carey and James F. Sullivan; Bartlett by Wm. F. Jordan, John T. Lang (died) and C. R. Ezell; Prothro by J. W. Carraker and Wallace Butts; Johnson by William H. Willis; Winn by R. M. Bisel (killed).
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
Many thanks, M E. Wolf!

Doles certainly had a distinguished military career.

My interest in Doles is part of my research into the 3rd North Carolina, which Doles commanded at Sharpsburg when he took over the Brigade after the wounded Gen. Ripley left the field.

Capt. Stephen Thruston of the 3rd NC sent an after-action report to the Governor of NC. which is of some value, but it is not very detailed. Thruston also produced an account of the battle that is quoted in the Walter Clark NC regimental histories, but I have not been able to locate the original source of the Thruston 'account'.
 
Last edited:

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
This report from Hill seems a good illustration of why he had a reputation as a cranky and disagreeable SOB. He seems to want to find fault with his fellow officers at every turn...


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/1 [S# 27]
SEPTEMBER 3-20, 1862.-The Maryland Campaign.
No. 293.--Report of Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill, C. S. Army, commanding division, of operations July 23-September 17.
HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,
------,1862.
GENERAL: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from the battles around Richmond until after the battle of Sharpsburg.

On July 23, I was detached from my division and placed in charge of the Department of the South Side, extending from Drewry's Bluff to the South Carolina line. As McClellan was then at Westover, on the James, some 30 miles from Richmond, and it was thought that he might attempt an advance by the south side, my first attention was given to the defenses in that direction. Heavy details were made from the division and two brigades near the bluff, to complete a line of intrenchments around it, and controlling the Petersburg road. Not a spadefull of earth had been thrown up about Petersburg, and it was in a wholly defenseless condition. A system of fortifications was begun (which subsequently met the approval of the chief engineer, Col. J. F. Gilmer, C. S. Army), and the brigades of Ransom, Walker, and Daniel were put to work on it. About 1,000 negroes were procured (chiefly from North Carolina) and employed in like manner. Pontoon bridges were constructed at several points, to make the connection rapid and secure between the two positions to be secured. The defenses of the Appomattox were also strengthened, and a movable car planned and ordered, to prevent a landing at City Point. An effort was made to organize and make efficient the numerous independent companies in the department, which had been of but little use and much expense to the country. A
concentration of these troops at Weldon and Goldsborough was ordered, to prevent the cutting of our important lines southward.

[extensive excerpt]
An examination of the pass, very early on the morning of the 14th, satisfied me that it could only be held by a large force, and was wholly indefensible by a small one. I accordingly ordered up Anderson's brigade. A regiment of Ripley's brigade was sent to hold another pass, some 3 miles distant, on our left. I felt reluctant to order up Ripley and Rodes from the important positions they were holding until something definite was known of the strength and design of the Yankees. About 7 o'clock they opened a fire upon our right, and pushed forward a large force through the dense woods to gain a practicable road to our rear. Garland's brigade was sent in to meet this overwhelming force, and succeeded in checking it and securing the road from any further attack that day. This brilliant service, however, cost us the life of that pure, gallant, and accomplished Christian soldier, General Garland, who had no superiors and few equals in the service. The Yankees on their side lost General Reno, a renegade Virginian, who was killed by a happy shot from the Twenty-third North Carolina. Garland's brigade was badly demoralized by his fall and the rough handling it had received, and, had the Yankees pressed vigorously forward, the road might have been gained. Providentially, they were ignorant of their success or themselves too much damaged to advance. The Twentieth North Carolina of this brigade, under Colonel Iverson, had attacked a Yankee battery, killed all the horses, and driven off the cannoneers. This battery was used no more that day by the Yankees. Anderson's brigade arrived in time to take the place of the much-demoralized troops of Garland. There were two mountain roads practicable for artillery on the right of the main turnpike. The defense of the farther one had cost Garland his life.

It was now intrusted to Colonel [T. L.] Rosser, of the cavalry, who had reported to me, and who had artillery and dismounted sharpshooters. General Anderson was intrusted with the care of the nearest and best road. Bondurant's battery was sent to aid him in its defense. The brigade of Colquitt was disposed on each side of the turnpike, and that: with Lane's battery, was judged adequate to the task. There was, however, a solitary peak on the left, which, if gained by the Yankees, would give them control of the ridge commanding the turnpike. The possession of this peak was, therefore, everything to the Yankees, but they seemed slow to perceive it. I had a large number of guns from Cutts' artillery placed upon the hill on the left of the turnpike, to sweep the approaches to this peak. From the position selected, there was a full view of the country for miles around, but the mountain was so steep that ascending columns were but little exposed to artillery fire. The artillerists of [A. S.] Cutts' battalion behaved gallantly, but their firing was the worst I ever witnessed. Rodes and Ripley came up soon after Anderson. Rodes was sent to the left, to seize the peak already mentioned, and Ripley was sent to the right to support Anderson. Several attempts had been made previous to this, by the Yankees, to force a passage through the woods on the right of and near the turnpike, but these were repulsed by the Sixth and Twenty-seventh Georgia and Thirteenth Alabama, of Colquitt's brigade.

It was now past noon, and the Yankees had been checked for more than five hours; but it was evident that they were in large force on both sides of the road, and the Signal Corps reported heavy masses at the foot of the mountain. In answer to a dispatch from General Longstreet, I urged him to hurry forward troops to my assistance. General Drayton and Col. G. T. Anderson came up, I think, about 3 o'clock, with 1,900 men, and I felt anxious to beat the force on my right before the Yankees made their grand attack, which I feared would be on our left. Anderson, Ripley, and Drayton were called together, and I directed them to follow a path until they came in contact with Rosser, when they should change their flank, march into line of battle, and sweep the woods before them. To facilitate their movements, I brought up a battery and made it shell the woods in various directions. Anderson soon became partially and Drayton hotly engaged, but Ripley did not draw trigger; why, I do not know. The Fourth North Carolina (Anderson's brigade) attempted to carry a Yankee battery, but failed. Three Yankee brigades moved up, in beautiful order, against Drayton, and his men were soon beaten and went streaming to the rear. Rosser, Anderson, and Ripley still held their ground, and the Yankees could not gain our rear.

Affairs were now very serious on our left. A division of Yankees was advancing in handsome style against Rodes. I had every possible gun turned upon the Yankee columns, but, owing to the steepness of the acclivity and the bad handling of the guns, but little harm was done to the " restorers of the Union." Rodes handled his little brigade in a most admirable and gallant manner, fighting, for hours, vastly superior odds, and maintaining the key-points of the position until darkness rendered a further advance of the Yankees impossible. Had he fought with less obstinacy, a practicable artillery road to the rear would have been gained on our left and the line of retreat cut off.

[extensive excerpt - not germane to Col/B.G. Doles or Sharpsburg]

We retreated that night to Sharpsburg, having accomplished all that was required--the delay of the Yankee army until Harper's Ferry could not be relieved.

Should the truth ever be known, the battle of South Mountain, as far as my division was concerned, will be regarded as one of the most remarkable and creditable of the war. The division had marched all the way from Richmond, and the straggling had been enormous in consequence of heavy marches, deficient commissariat, want of shoes, and inefficient officers. Owing to these combined causes, the division numbered less than 5,000 men the morning of September 14, and had five roads to guard, extending over a space of as many miles. This small force successfully resisted, without support, for eight hours, the whole Yankee army, and, when its supports were beaten; still held the roads, so that our retreat was effected without the loss of a gun, a wagon, or an ambulance. Rodes' brigade had immortalized itself; Colquitt's had fought well, and the two regiments most closely pressed (Twenty-third and Twenty-eighth Georgia) had repulsed the foe. Garland's brigade had behaved nobly, until demoralized by the fall of its gallant leader, and being outflanked by the Yankees. Anderson's brigade had shown its wonted gallantry. Ripley's brigade, for some cause, had not been engaged, and was used with Hood's two brigades to cover the retreat.

Had Longstreet's division been with mine at daylight in the morning, the Yankees would have been disastrously repulsed; but they had gained important positions before the arrival of re-enforcements. These additional troops came up, after a long, hurried, and exhausting march, to defend localities of which they were ignorant, and to fight a foe flushed with partial success, and already holding key-points to further advance. Had our forces never been separated, the battle of Sharpsburg never would have been fought, and the Yankees would not have even the shadow of consolation for the loss of Harper's Ferry.

We reached Sharpsburg about daylight on the morning of the 15th. The Yankees made their appearance that day, and some skirmishing and cannonading occurred.

There was a great deal of artillery firing during the forenoon of the 16th, and late that afternoon the Yankees crossed the Antietam opposite the center of my line and made for the Hagerstown turnpike. Had we been in a condition to attack them as they crossed, much damage might have been inflicted; but as yet there were but two weak divisions on the ground. Longstreet held the position south of the Boonsborough turnpike, and I that on the right. Hood's command was placed on my left to guard the Hagerstown pike. Just before sundown I got up a battery (Lane's), of Cutts' battalion, to open upon the Yankee columns advancing toward that pike, while Col. Stephen D. Lee brought up another farther on the right. These checked the Yankee advance, and enabled Jackson to take position on Hood's left and covering any attempt to turn us in that direction.

My ranks had been diminished by some additional straggling, and the morning of the 17th I had but 3,000 infantry. I had, however, twenty-six pieces of artillery of my own and near fifty [?] pieces of Cutts' battalion, temporarily under my command. Positions were selected for as many of these guns as could be used; but all the ground in my front was completely commanded by the long-range artillery of the Yankees on the other side of the Antietam, which concentrated their fire upon every gun that opened and soon disabled or silenced it.

t daylight a brisk skirmish began along Hood's front, and Colquitt, Ripley, and McRae (commanding Garland's brigade) were moved up to his support. Hood's men always right well, and they were handsomely supported by Colquitt and Ripley. The first line of the Yankees was broken, and our men pushed vigorously forward, but to meet another, and yet another, line. Colquitt had gone in with 10 field officers; 4 were killed, 5 badly wounded, and the tenth had been stunned by a shell. The men were beginning to fall back, and efforts were made to rally them in the bed of an old road, nearly at right angles to the Hagerstown pike, and which had been their position previous to the advance. These efforts, however, were only partially successful. Most of the brigade took no further part in the action. Garland's brigade (Colonel McRae commanding) had been much demoralized by the fight at South Mountain, but the men advanced with alacrity, secured a good position, and were fighting bravely when Captain [T. P.] Thomson, Fifth North Carolina, cried out, "They are flanking us." This cry spread like an electric shock along the ranks, bringing up vivid recollections of the flank fire at South Mountain. In a moment they broke and fell to the rear. Colonel McRae, though wounded, remained on the field all day and succeeded in gathering up some stragglers, and personally rendered much efficient service. The Twenty-third North Carolina Regiment, of this brigade, was brought off by the gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Johnston, and posted, by my order, in the old road already described. Ripley's brigade had united with Walker's and fallen back with it behind the ridge to the left of this road and near to it. We had now lost all the ground wrested from the enemy, and were occupying the position held in the morning. But three of my brigades had been broken and much demoralized, and all of the artillery had been withdrawn from my front. Rodes and Anderson were in the old road, and some stragglers had been gathered up and placed upon their left.

It was now apparent that the Yankees were massing in our front, and that their grand attack would be made upon my position, which was the center of our line. I sent several urgent messages to General Lee for re-enforcements, but before any arrived a heavy force (since ascertained to be Franklin's corps) advanced in three parallel lines, with all the precision of a parade day, upon my two brigades. They met with a galling fire, however, recoiled, and fell back; again advanced, and again fell back, and finally lay down behind the crest of the hill and kept up an irregular fire. I got a battery in position, which partially enfiladed the Yankee line and aided materially to check its advance. This battery was brought up by my aide, Lieut. J. A. Reid, who received a painful wound in the discharge of that duty.

[extensive excerpt]
The battle of Sharpsburg was a success so far as the failure of the Yankees to carry the position they assailed. It would, however, have been a glorious victory for us but for three causes:

First. The separation of our forces. Had McLaws and R. H. Anderson been there earlier in the morning, the battle would not have lasted two hours, and would have been signally disastrous to the Yankees.

Second. The bad handling of our artillery. This could not cope with the superior weight, caliber, range, and number of the Yankee guns; hence it ought only to have been used against masses of infantry. On the contrary, our guns were made to reply to the Yankee guns, and were smashed up or withdrawn before they could be effectually turned against massive columns of attack. An artillery duel between the Washington Artillery and the Yankee batteries across the Antietam on the 16th was the most melancholy farce in the war.

Third. The enormous straggling. The battle was fought with less than 30,000 men. Had all our stragglers been up, McClellan's army would have been completely crushed or annihilated. Doubtless the want of shoes, the want of food, and physical exhaustion had kept many brave men from being with the army; but thousands of thieving poltroons had kept away from sheer cowardice. The straggler is generally a thief and always a coward, lost to all sense of shame; he can only be kept in ranks by a strict and sanguinary discipline.
List of casualties.
Command Killed. Wounded. Missing.
Rodes' brigade 111 289 225
Ripley's brigade 110 506 124
Garland's brigade 46 210 187
Anderson's brigade 64 299 202
Colquitt's brigade 129 518 184
Artillery 4 30 3
Total 464 1,852 925

In this sad list we have specially to mourn many distinguished officers. Brigadier-General Garland was killed at South Mountain--the most fearless man I ever knew, a Christian hero, a ripe scholar, and most accomplished gentleman. Brig. Gen. G. B. Anderson was mortally wounded at Sharpsburg--a high-toned, honorable, conscientious Christian soldier, highly gifted, and lovely in all the qualities that adorn a man. Col. C. C. Tew, Second North Carolina Regiment, was one of the most finished scholars on the continent, and had no superior as a soldier in the field. Col. B. B. Gayle, Twelfth Alabama, a most gallant and accomplished officer, was killed at South Mountain. Col. W. P. Barclay, Twenty-third Georgia, the hero of South Mountain, was killed at Sharpsburg. There, too, fell those gallant Christian soldiers, Col. Levi B. Smith, Twenty-seventh Georgia, and Lieut. Col. J. M. Newton, of the Sixth Georgia. The modest and heroic Major [P.] Tracy, of the Sixth Georgia, met there, too, a bloody grave. The lamented Captain [W. F.] Plane, of that regiment, deserves a special mention. Of him it could be truly said that he shrank from no danger, no fatigue, and no exposure. Maj. Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, fell, fighting most heroically, at Sharpsburg. He had received a military education, and gave promise of eminence in his profession. Capt. James B. Atwell, Twentieth North Carolina, deserves to live in the memory of his countrymen for almost unsurpassed gallantry. After having greatly distinguished himself in the capture of the Yankee battery at South Mountain, he fell, heroically fighting, at Sharpsburg. Brigadier-General Ripley received a severe wound in the throat from a Minie-ball, which would have proven fatal but for passing through his cravat. After his wound was dressed, he heroically returned to the field, and remained to the close of the day with his brigade. Brigadier-General Rodes received a painful contusion from a shell, but remained with his command. Colonel McRae, commanding brigade, was struck in the forehead, but gallantly remained on the field. Colonel Bennett, Fourteenth North Carolina Regiment, who had conducted himself most nobly throughout, won my special admiration for the heroism he exhibited at the moment of receiving what he supposed to be a mortal wound. Colonel [W. L.] De Rosset, Third North Carolina, received a severe wound at Sharpsburg, which I fear will forever deprive the South of his most valuable services. Col. F. M. Parker, Thirtieth North Carolina, a modest, brave, and accomplished officer, was severely wounded at Sharpsburg. Col. J. B. Gordon, Sixth Alabama, the Chevalier Bayard of the army, received five wounds at Sharpsburg before he would quit the field. The heroic Colonel lB. D.] Fry, Thirteenth Alabama, and Colonel [E. A.] O'Neal, Twenty-sixth Alabama, who had both been wounded at Seven Pines, were once more wounded severely, at Sharpsburg, while nobly doing their duty. Lieutenant-Colonel [S. B.] Pickens, Twelfth Alabama, and Major [R. D.] Redden, Twenty-sixth Alabama, were both wounded at South Mountain, the former severely. They greatly distinguished themselves in that battle. Lieut. Col. J. N. Lightfoot, Sixth Alabama, and Lieutenant-Colonel [William A.] Johnston, Fourteenth North Carolina, were wounded at Sharpsburg, the latter slightly. Major [S. I).] Thruston, Third North Carolina, received a painful contusion, but did not leave the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Ruffin, Thirteenth North Carolina, remained with his regiment on South Mountain after receiving three painful wounds. Lieutenant-Colonel [W. H.] Betts, Thirteenth Alabama, was slightly wounded. Lieutenant Colonel [C. T.] Zachry, Twenty-seventh Georgia, had just recovered from a severe wound before Richmond to receive a more serious one at Sharpsburg. Lieutenant-Colonel [E. F.] Best and Major [J. H.] Huggins, Twenty-third Georgia, gallant and meritorious officers, were severely wounded at Sharpsburg.

It becomes my grateful task to speak in the highest terms of my brigade commanders, two of whom sealed their devotion to their country with their lives. Major [J. W.] Ratchford, Major Pierson, chief of artillery, and Lieut. J. A. Reid, of my staff; were conspicuous for their gallantry. Captain Overton, serving temporarily with me, was wounded at Sharpsburg, but remained under fire until I urged him to leave the field. Captain West and Lieut. T. J. Moore, ordnance officers, discharged faithfully their duty and rendered important service on the field at South Mountain. Maj. Archer Anderson, adjutant, had been wounded in crossing the Potomac, and I lost his valuable services in Maryland. Sergeant Harmeling and Privates Thomas Jones and Minter, of the couriers, acquitted themselves handsomely.

Brigadier-General Redes reports as specially deserving notice for their gallantry, Colonel O'Neal and Major Redden, Twenty-sixth Alabama; Col. J. B. Gordon, Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, Lieut. P. H. Larey, Sergt. J. B. Hancock, Sixth Alabama; Maj. E. L. Hobson, Capt. T. M. Riley, Lieut. J. M. Goff, Sergt. A. Swicegood, Color-Corpl. Joshua Smith, Fifth Alabama; Col. C. A. Battle, Capt. E. S. Ready (badly wounded), Lieuts. J. J. Lake (killed) and E. T. Randall (wounded), Sergts. N. M, Howard, William Taylor, J. W. Hauxthall, James Stewart, Henry Donnelson, and George Ellison, Corpl. Josiah Ely, and Privates Joseph Lee and Hollanquist, Third Alabama.

Brigadier-General Colquitt reports in like manner N. B. Neusan, Color-Sergt. J. J. Powell, W. W. Glover, H. M. James, and N. B. Lane, colorguard Sixth Georgia; Corpls. John Cooper, Joseph J. Wood, Privates J. W. Tompkins, B.C. Lapsade, L. B. Hannah, A.D. Simmons, W. Smith, J. M. Feltman, and J. C. Penn. Captain [W. M.] Arnold, Sixth Georgia, who commanded a battalion of skirmishers at South Mountain and Sharpsburg, is entitled to the highest commendation for his skill and gallantry. Captain [N. J.] Garrison, commanding Twenty-eighth Georgia, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment. Captain [James W.]Banning, Twenty-eighth Georgia Regiment, was distinguished for his intrepid coolness, fighting in the ranks, with gun in hand, and stimulating his men by his words and examples. W.R. Johnson and William Goff, Twenty-eighth Georgia; Lieuts. B. A. Bowen, R. S. Tomme, and L. D. Ford, First Sergeant Herring, Sergts. J. L. Moore, T. P. W. Bullard, and J. J. Adams, Corpl. J. A. Lee, and Privates W. A. Estes, J. S. Wingate, W. S. Walker, Isaac Hundley, Thomas Sudler, J. J. Gordon, Simeon Williamson, Mosely, McCall, J. M. Vanse, J. Hutchings. Thomas Argo, J. S. Dennis, W. J. Claybanks, Joseph Herron, and W. D. Tingle, Thirteenth Alabama.

The officers commanding the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth Georgia Regiments report that it is impossible for them to make distinctions where so many acted with distinguished bravery. In the Twenty-seventh every commissioned officer except one was killed or wounded at Sharpsburg, and this sole survivor was unwilling to discriminate among so many brave men.

Brigadier-General Doles (now commanding Ripley's brigade) pays a tribute to the memory of Maj. Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, and speaks in the most complimentary terms of Colonel De Rosset and Major Thruston, Third North Carolina(the former severely and the latter slightly wounded), and Captains [E.G.] Meares, [Lieutenant D. E.] McNair, and [D.] Williams, of the same regiment. Lieut. Col. H. A. Brown and Capt. J. N. Harrell, acting major of the First North Carolina Regiment, are also highly commended. Lieut. Col. Phil. Cook, Captains [W. H.] Willis, [F. H.] DeGraffenried, and Lieutenants [E. A.] Hawkins, [R. M.] Bisel, [W. W.] Hulbert, [J. T.] Gay (wounded), [J. G.] Stephens, [C. R.] Ezell, [F. T.] Snead, [L. M.] Cobb (killed), [J. C.] Macon (severely wounded), "all commended themselves to my special notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct." Captain [John C.] Key, commanding Forty-fourth Georgia, and Captain Read, assistant adjutant-general, are equally commended. Asst. Surg. William P. Young remained on the field after he was wounded, caring for the wounded, and fell into the hands of the enemy. Privates Thomas S. Cartright, Joseph L. Richardson, and Henry E. Welch, Fourth Georgia, are mentioned with distinction. The first-named fell with the colors of his regiment in his hand; Richardson was wounded. Privates R. Dudley Hill and Thomas J. Dingier, two lads in the Forty-fourth Georgia, attracted, in an especial manner, the attention of their commander by their extraordinary daring. Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, of the First North Carolina Regiment, who commanded in both battles in Maryland, says that all did their duty in his regiment, and he cannot discriminate.

[extensive excerpt - not germane to Doles or 4th Georgia]

Respectfully submitted.
D. H. HILL,
Major-General.
Gen. R. H. CHILTON,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
 
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M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Location
Virginia
Many thanks, M E. Wolf!

Doles certainly had a distinguished military career.

My interest in Doles is part of my research into the 3rd North Carolina, which Doles commanded at Sharpsburg when he took over the Brigade after the wounded Gen. Ripley left the field.

Capt. Stephen Thruston of the 3rd NC sent an after-action report to the Governor of NC. which is of some value, but it is not very detailed. Thruston also produced an account of the battle that is quoted in the Walter Clark NC regimental histories, but I have not been able to locate the original source of the Thruston 'account'.
I must remind those reading, that "after action reports" as a term did not exist. It is a modern term. Reports, Special Reports might be the better choice of search, using their vocabulary reference.

M. E. Wolf
 
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