Discussion CoinJock, NC. had a Civil War Moment, Yea!

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5fish

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HEY! Hey! My mom's hometown of Coinjock, NC. had a big moment during the Civil War on Sept. 8, 1864.

September 8 — The only capture of a Unites States Congressman during the Civil War — at Coinjock in Currituck County. George Washington Julian was taken prisoner when Capt. J. N. Maffitt ordered pilot J. B. Hopkins to take a detail of twenty Confederate sailors to the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal and capture the mail boat Fawn. Julian was subsequently released in Elizabeth City.

They capture the mail boat Fawn at the Currituck Bridge which is in Coinjock. Below is a link to a section in a book which details the event. It's like a paragraph long...

http://books.google.com/books?id=Jp2kfqaSxnsC&pg=PA128&dq=Capture+U.+S.+Congressman+George+Washington+Julian+1864&ei=LDx5S-GSOoe6ywS6wf3pBA&cd=1#v=onepage&q=Capture U. S. Congressman George Washington Julian 1864&f=false


No one knows why the Confederate sailors let Congressman Julian go after learning who he was..


Yea!! My mom's hometown had a Civil War moment! Yea!!

Yea! Coinjock!!
 

Will Posey

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No one knows why the Confederate sailors let Congressman Julian go after learning who he was..
Bribery, perhaps? Not accusing anyone, just suggesting a possible reason.

I think the article does speculate that the Confederate sailors may have not wanted to get embroiled in a political mess by holding prisoner a congressman.

Will
 

larry_cockerham

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HEY! Hey! My mom's hometown of Coinjock, NC. had a big moment during the Civil War on Sept. 8, 1864.

September 8 — The only capture of a Unites States Congressman during the Civil War — at Coinjock in Currituck County. George Washington Julian was taken prisoner when Capt. J. N. Maffitt ordered pilot J. B. Hopkins to take a detail of twenty Confederate sailors to the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal and capture the mail boat Fawn. Julian was subsequently released in Elizabeth City.

They capture the mail boat Fawn at the Currituck Bridge which is in Coinjock. Below is a link to a section in a book which details the event. It's like a paragraph long...

http://books.google.com/books?id=Jp2kfqaSxnsC&pg=PA128&dq=Capture+U.+S.+Congressman+George+Washington+Julian+1864&ei=LDx5S-GSOoe6ywS6wf3pBA&cd=1#v=onepage&q=Capture U. S. Congressman George Washington Julian 1864&f=false


No one knows why the Confederate sailors let Congressman Julian go after learning who he was..


Yea!! My mom's hometown had a Civil War moment! Yea!!

Yea! Coinjock!!
Coinjock looks like a moderately swinging town. I've never been on the north side of the Albemarle Sound though I would love to see Edenton up close. My folks hail from Smethport, about as hard to find on the map and about as far west from Coinjock as you can get in North Carolina.
 
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5fish

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A note the bridge is gone in the 1970's the state built a causeway south of Coinjock cutting off the traffic through the town. I do not know when the bridge was removed...

The town needs to put up a marker identifying the event.
 

NC Squadron

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A note the bridge is gone in the 1970's the state built a causeway south of Coinjock cutting off the traffic through the town. I do not know when the bridge was removed...

The town needs to put up a marker identifying the event.
A new bridge was built on the west of town to clear up traffic problems from the openings and closings of the swing span. The canal is really popular, so they built a bridge with a 60' plus span to accommodate sailboats and yachts. Traffic heading to and from the Outer Banks was heavy and huge backups occurred whenever the bridge opened. The old swing span was located near the spot where the old Civil War drawbridge stood. Guerrilla also captured the Emily and the Arrow in that same area back in mid-1863. The mail captured was sent to Confederate authorities and used to estimate Union troop strengths by the regiments represented in the mail addresses.
 
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RoadDog

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I have been doing some research on this since today is the 155th anniversary of Rep. Julian's capture. I was unable to get the Google Book excerpt. The N.C. Civil War Sesquicentennial had pretty much the same words to say as 5fish. That is where I first heard about this event.

George Washington Julian played a big role in the Civil War and before and after it. I'd never heard of him, though.

I wonder if Maffitt knew the Congressman was going to be on the Fawn?

Plus, a good question as to why he was released and not used for a trade or something.

RoadDog
 

5fish

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I have been doing some research on this since today is the 155th anniversary of Rep. Julian's capture. I was unable to get the Google Book excerpt. The N.C. Civil War Sesquicentennial had pretty much the same words to say as 5fish. That is where I first heard about this event.

George Washington Julian played a big role in the Civil War and before and after it. I'd never heard of him, though.

I wonder if Maffitt knew the Congressman was going to be on the Fawn?

Plus, a good question as to why he was released and not used for a trade or something.

RoadDog
i found this on the story... it may have been a swap of citizens...



 
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HEY! Hey! My mom's hometown of Coinjock, NC. had a big moment during the Civil War on Sept. 8, 1864.

September 8 — The only capture of a Unites States Congressman during the Civil War — at Coinjock in Currituck County. George Washington Julian was taken prisoner when Capt. J. N. Maffitt ordered pilot J. B. Hopkins to take a detail of twenty Confederate sailors to the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal and capture the mail boat Fawn. Julian was subsequently released in Elizabeth City.
I believe that U. S. Congressman Alfred Ely of New York was captured and taken prisoner at the Battle of First Bull Run, July 18, 1861 and held until Christmas Day, 1861.
 
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5fish

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I wonder if Maffitt knew the Congressman was going to be on the Fawn?
Hey, it seems the raid broke the deal between Elizbeth City and the Union and it seems the city let him go free... read the three OR's you see the locals cut a deal with the union... about the canal... the rebels broke it...


Here is a summary of why Hopkins burned the fawn....

 

5fish

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A picture from his landing taken about 1970.
Found a gem... about the event... http://www.oldbaldycwrt.org/obwp/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/September-2015-Newsletter.pdf

Under Both Flags Tales of the Civil War as Told by the Veterans FRANK P. O’BRIEN Confederate Soldier The troops were to move on Newbern as soon as the “Albemarle” had reached Croatan Sound. The result of the engagement in Albemarle Sound between the sturdy old Confederate ram, with nine of the largest double-enders in the Federal navy, on May 5, 1864, will never be forgotten by those who to-day are able to describe it. The “Merrimac” engagement in Hampton Roads is often referred to as the greatest naval engagement of the nineteenth century, and comparatively little has ever been written of the engagement of the 5th of May. As a member of the famous old 3d Alabama, I witnessed the “Merrimac” fi ght from Sewell’s Point, but I participated in the latter as a volunteer, and in my judgment the “Merrimac” engagement compares to the “Albemarle” fi ght as a skirmish to a pitched battle. But to my story: During one of my scouting trips over on the Chowan and in and around Elizabeth, I learned that two mailboats made regular semi-weekly trips between Roanoke Island and Norfolk, and that on a certain (lay the United States paymaster would go to Roanoke Island from Norfolk on the mail-boat “Fawn.” I returned to Plymouth and reported my information, which was perfectly reliable, to Captain John Maffi tt, of “Florida” fame, who, soon after the engagement of May 5th, had relieved Captain Cooke of the command of the “Albemarle.” Captain Maffi tt organized a crew to carry out my idea of capturing the boat. Master’s Mate James H. Long was placed in command, but on the eve of leaving he was ordered not to go, as he had but recently recovered from a severe spell of sickness. Mr. Shelley, sailing-master, took his place. My plan was to go to the draw-bridge on the road leading from Windsor, in Bertie county, capture the draw-bridge keeper, force him to respond to the signal of the “Fawn” as she approached, and when within a short distance to close the bridge. Orders were given to the men that at a given signal, which was to be the fi ring of a pistol, the men who were concealed in the bushes on both sides of the canal were to rush forward and board the vessel. This was easily done, as in many places along the bank a man could step from the shore to the boat. Everything was carried out to the point of opening the bridge. Engineer Disher was detailed from the “ Albemarle ” to take charge of the prize when captured. His orders were to run her from the canal into Pasquotank River, thence to the Sound, across to Roanoke River, thence to Plymouth. Engineer Disher, becoming greatly excited, discharged his pistol too soon. This gave the alarm, and precipitated the attack. All our men boarded the boat immediately. If there was a paymaster’s mail on board the “Fawn,” it was the fi rst thing to be destroyed, for when we boarded her we found that the crew had thrown a number of mail and other bags into the furnace. Among those captured, to my great astonishment, I found Major John H. Burnham, of the 16th Connecticut, whom I had assisted in capturing at Plymouth. This brave offi cer had been exchanged, and had reported at Norfolk for duty. On account of bad health he was given a furlough, but before leaving for home he decided to go to Roanoke Island on the “Fawn,” and see his old comrades who were on duty at that place, but, unfortunately for him, the boat was captured, as set forth in the foregoing. Just here came a struggle between duty to country and sympathy for the unfortunate soldier, broken in health caused by confi nement in prison, who had been looking forward to a speedy reunion with loved ones whom he had not seen in over two years. I would gladly have liberated him, but duty forbade, and poor Burnham was again an inmate of a Confederate prison. Nothing of moment occurred for several weeks after the destruction of the “Fawn.” I made frequent trips to Edenton and Chowan county. bringing back such information as I could gather of interest. The last trip I made was October 20th. This time I entered the little town of Edenton. I was the bearer of several letters from parties on the outside. I was informed by a Mr. Gregory that he had information of a movement of some kind that was on foot for the capture of Plymouth. I returned to the garrison and reported to Colonel George H. Wortham, who was in command of the point. On the night of the 27th, the culmination of the plan of attack was reached by the daring feat of Lieutenant W. B. Cushing in the blowing up of the “Albemarle” and the capture of Plymouth after eight hours of hard fi ghting. A Union Report SEPTEMBER 9,1864 - Capture of Steamer Fawn and skirmish at Currituck Bridge, Va. Report of Colonel David W. Wardrop, Ninety-ninth New York Infantry, commanding Sub-District of Albemarle. HEADQUARTERS SUB-DISTRICT OF ALBEMARLE, On board Steamer Trumpeter, September 10, 1864, Sir: I regret to inform you that the steamer Fawn was captured and burned by the enemy at Currituck Bridge yesterday at 6 p. m. I have examined and passed the wreck; she is completely destroyed. At Currituck Bridge I found the body of Charles H. Gibson, D Company, Twenty-third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, killed; Charles Fox, I Company, same regiment, seriously wounded. He informed me that 1 Lieutenant Colonel, 2 Majors, and 1 fi rst lieutenant (I have ascertained to be Lieutenant J. M. Wilson, One hundred and third Pennsylvania Volunteers), 8 enlisted men, all of the Twenty-third Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, some civilians (2 of whom are wounded) together with the crew, are all prisoners. Mr. Simmons, a resident at the bridge, was a passenger on the boat, and states that the enemy numbered about thirt-y-fi ve men, and were commanded by one Hopkins, formerly a packet-master on the canal and a resident of Norfolk, now an offi cer on the rebel ram Albemarle, and that the expedition was gotten up expressly to capture the mail boat on this route. He thinks that they over-looked the baggage and mails, as he saw what property they took away, and they were not among it. Please advise me what steps will be taken to keep this route open. I will send a boat on Monday to meet the boat from Norfolk if you send one. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant D. W. WARDROP, Colonel Ninety-ninth New York Volunteers, Commanding. Brigadier General G. F. SHFPLEY, Commanding District of Eastern Virginia, Norfolk, Va.

A Short Side Story U.S. Congressman George W. Julian of Indiana, a Republican member of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, took the mail boat Fawn to Roanoke Island to fi nd out whether sutlers there were price-gouging the soldiers to whom they sold goods. On February 9, 1864, on the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, Confederates attacked the ship, killed or wounded 7 people, captured 29 passengers including Julian, and burned the Fawn. Julian was soon released at Elizabeth City and continued to Roanoke Island.
 
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