Cloyd's Mountain

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
Anyone ever visit the site of this fierce little battle in Southwest Virginia? It is my understanding that it is in private hands, but I'm not entirely sure.

Anyone ever study this battle?


Regards,

John W.
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Near Kankakee
JohnW:
Not only have I never visited it, I've never heard of it.

Do you know when it was? Who was involved? Circumstances (clashing cavalry, recon running afoul of each other)?

It would be fun to run it down and get some details on it.
Ole
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Near Kankakee
Gawd, I love google.

Cloyd's Mountain, May 9, 1864. General Crook to be backed up by Averill was headed out to cut the VA&TN RR.

Privately owned. N of Dublin on Rte 100. 43 mi. sw of Roanoke and 5 mi from I-81.

Looks like it should have made it into the books.
Ole
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
It was a fierce one that doesn't get a lot of press. General Albert Jenkins was mortally wounded during the battle. It got so hot that it was hand to hand for a while, and the casualties were high considering the number engaged. I believe Cloyd's Mountain would be a huge draw for Civil War enthusiasts and an excellent place for educating children in this vital area of our history, but it remains one of the area's best-kept secrets. Here is a description from the NPS:


Cloyd’s Mountain


Other Names: None

Location: Pulaski County

Campaign: Crook-Averell Raid on the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad (May 1864)

Date(s): May 9, 1864

Principal Commanders: Brig. Gen. George Crook [US]; Brig. Gen. Albert Jenkins [CS]

Forces Engaged: Divisions (approx. 10,000)

Estimated Casualties: 1,500 total

Description: On May 9, Crook’s three brigades (6,100 men) on a raid into southwestern Virginia encountered a patchwork Confederate force under Brig. Gen. Albert Jenkins at Cloyd’s Mountain. Fighting was furious and hand-to-hand. Casualties were heavy for the size of the forces engaged: Union 10%, Confederate 23%. Jenkins was mortally wounded. Crook afterwards joined forces with Averell, who had burned the New River Bridge, and the united column withdrew to Meadow Bluff after destroying several important railroad bridges.

Result(s): Union victory

CWSAC Reference #: VA049 Preservation Priority: III.3 (Class C)
 

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Nashville
I hadn't heard of this one. I've been sidetracked down in Georgia during this timeframe. Thanks for broadening my horizons.
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
First heard of it years ago when I saw it on a soldier's tombstone. After I began studying the War in earnest, I found out one of my gr-gr-grandfathers was in the heat of the action there, with the 45th Virginia Infantry. From what I understand, the site is unchanged from 1864.


Regards,

John W.
 

8thvacav

Cadet
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
John,
My gg grandfather fought in that battle. He was in the 8th Va. Cav. under Jenkins Do you have the Regimental History of the 45th Va.? I have a copy of it if you would like me to look up anything. It has the rosters in it.
Martin
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
Hello Martin,

Yes, I recently obtained a copy of the 45th Virginia regimental history. Thank you for your kind offer. My ancestor was Samuel C. Davis.

Do you live in SW Virginia? Cloyd's Mountain is an untapped resource.

Warm Regards,

John W.

P.S. Like your signature! :wink:
 

ewc

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
pittsburgh
Excellent link JohnW. Shelby Foote Vol 3 of his Trilogy gives a good account of this battle. Foote's broad view does not neglect these little known and out of the way encounters.
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
Ed,


Foote's trilogy is among my most prized possessions. I plan on reading it again soon. No wonder it is considered by many to be one of the greatest literary works of the 20th century.

Regards,

John W.
 

8thvacav

Cadet
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
John,
South west Va. is where my ancestors are from. I live in Indiana near the home town of Lew Wallace. Hence my signature. Here is a Shot Tower Not far from there.
Virginia Shot Tower
Wytheville, VA

The Jackson Ferry Shot Tower was typical of others in the country that made small spherical lead shot for the fowling pieces of frontier settlers. Smelted lead from the nearby Austinville mines was melted at the top of the tower and poured through a sizing sieve to produce small droplets. Surface tension caused the molted lead to assume a spherical shape that solidified during its 150-foot fall. The shot was then collected in a water-filled kettle at the bottom of the shaft.

The "drop process" was patented in England in 1769 by William Watts, a craftsman of Bristol, England. He profited handsomely from its prevalent use. The tower was built by Thomas Jackson, an English immigrant, in 1807. The tower and grounds were restored through the efforts of local organizations, individuals, and the Commonwealth of Virginia.
Expired Image Removed
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
Martin,

I'm very familiar with the historic Shot Tower. My mom was born & raised in Austinville, and my folks now live in Wytheville. I live in upper East Tennessee, about a 90 minute drive from there.

Wasn't Lew Wallace one of the generals at Cedar Creek? I remember he was the governor of the New Mexico Territory and sought to bring Billy the Kid to justice. I guess his greatest accomplishment was his writing of the classic story, "Ben-Hur."

Regards,

John W.
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
Martin,

Actually I had the right battle, but the wrong guy. :smile:

For some weird reason, I always confuse Lew Wallace and Rutherford B. Hays. Not sure why, but it's a brain burp I can't seem to overcome. Maybe it's their similar beards? Who knows. Sorry about that. :shrug:

Regards,

John W.
 

SWVAson

Cadet
Joined
Sep 27, 2005
Location
South Western Virginia
John,


I live about 3 miles away from where the battle took place. Believe it or not this area was a very important place for the Confederate States. One because it was the only railroad link to East Tenn. and secondly for the very important link to the salt works at Saltville Va. I can't recall the persons name that owns the farm now but it does have a place where you can pull off and see the battle field. Although I have several ancestors that fought for the CSA they were all in northern VA or in NC at the time. I will try to find out who owns the property now and let you know just in case you ever want to visit.
Clay
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
SWVAson said:
John,


I live about 3 miles away from where the battle took place. Believe it or not this area was a very important place for the Confederate States. One because it was the only railroad link to East Tenn. and secondly for the very important link to the salt works at Saltville Va. I can't recall the persons name that owns the farm now but it does have a place where you can pull off and see the battle field. Although I have several ancestors that fought for the CSA they were all in northern VA or in NC at the time. I will try to find out who owns the property now and let you know just in case you ever want to visit.
Clay

Clay,

It's really good to hear from you. All of my family is from Wythe and Pulaski Counties, mostly Wythe. My folks live near Wytheville.

You are correct about SW Virginia's strategic importance to the war. So important, that the great John Hunt Morgan came to the rescue of the town. Saltville is a very unique place as well.

I'd really like to visit the Cloyd's Mountain site in the future. It's Va's best kept secret.

Thanks, and I hope you keep posting.

Regards,

John W.
 

8thvacav

Cadet
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
John W and Clay,
Do you know of any diarys of men in the 8th Va. Cav.? A lot of the men came from Bland and Tazewell County. I read part of the guys over in WV that was in the 8th.
Martin
 

JohnW in E.TN

Corporal
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Location
upper E. Tennessee
8thvacav said:
John W and Clay,
Do you know of any diarys of men in the 8th Va. Cav.? A lot of the men came from Bland and Tazewell County. I read part of the guys over in WV that was in the 8th.
Martin




Martin,

Do you have this book? : Soldier of Southwestern Virginia
The Civil War Letters of Captain John Preston Sheffey


Edited by James I. Robertson, Jr.




I've heard it's a good one, and it has been on my "to buy" list for a while. I'll stay on the lookout for any other diaries and letters from men in the 8th Va Cav.

I'd appreciate you keeping a lookout for any diaries or letters dealing with the 51st or 54th Va Infantries. I may have most of them, but you never know. :thumbsup:

Regards,

John W.
 
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