Clinch Rifles


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AUG

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campo36.jpg

The Clinch Rifles photographed in full uniform at Augusta, Ga.
(Miller's Photographic History of the Civil War)

campo37.jpg
Should probably add that I've since found that the bottom photo in my earlier post is actually not the Clinch Rifles. In a second edition of The Photographic History of the Civil War Vol. 8 it was correctly identified as the Oglethorpe Infantry in Augusta, GA, April 1861, which was another prewar militia company from Augusta.

This photo is indeed the Clinch Rifles though.

campo36.jpg
 

DOswalt

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Half Plate Tintype of a Group of Confederate Militia "Clinch Rifles", Augusta, Georgia ca 1860s - Approximately 200 units were formed in Georgia in service to the Confederate States before and during the Civil War. One of them was 5th Georgia Infantry Regiment. It was organized on May 11th, 1861, with further companies joining the unit during the following year. Its combat roster started with capture of Santa Rosa Island, followed by Corinth Campaign in April-June 1862. One of the distinguished companies of the 5th was company "A," the famous Clinch Rifles. The company was named for General Duncan L. Clinch the commander at the Battles of Withlacoochee and the Cove of the Seminole Wars (1835-1836). The company adopted the motto "Charge Again" after General Clinch's order to the retreating troops at the Battle of Withlacoochee to attack the enemy again.

Clinch Rifles
were a true rifle company using 1841 Mississippi Rifle and saber bayonet in action during the American Civil War. While the Union had regulated the design of uniforms from the beginning of the conflict, the Confederate units were initially made of volunteers and enjoyed considerable freedom in their choice of uniforms. Maintaining the European of green infantry clothing, the Clinch Rifles elected green as their unit color, with elegant gold braid and buttons plus a French-style cap.

Despite all the gallantry, the 5th Georgia Infantry regiment's subsequent combat history reflects the dwindling cause of the Confederate States in the war: Battle of Murfreesboro (December 1862 - January 1863, here the Clinch Rifles lost 55% of their strength) -- Tullahoma Campaign (June - August 1863) -- Chattanooga Siege (September - November 1863) -- Atlanta Campaign (May - September 1864) -- Savannah Campaign (November - December 1864) -- Carolinas Campaign (February - April 1865) -- Bentonville (March 1865). Following the demise of the South, the remains of the unit surrendered at Durham Station, Orange County, NC on April 26, 1865.

http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/5387469

largeClinch%20Rifles.jpg

"Clinch Rifles, Georgia Militia 1861" by Don Troiani depicts a private of the Clinch Rifles in their early war green uniform.

campo36.jpg

The Clinch Rifles photographed in full uniform at Augusta, Ga.
(Miller's Photographic History of the Civil War)

campo37.jpg
As noted above, the last grouping was/is mislabeled and is not the Clinch Rifles, but is the Oglethorpe Infantry Co. D, 1st GA. Note the Sky/light blue pants. At this point in time the Clinch's trousers were darker green w/ a gold stripe or black.
 
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AUG

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This last grouping was/is mislabeled and is not the Clinch Rifles, but is the Oglethorpe Infantry Co. D, 1st GA. Note the Sky/light blue pants. At this point in time the Clinch's trousers were darker green w/ a gold stripe or black
I noted that in the above post. It was mislabeled in The Photographic History of the Civil War Vol. 8 but later corrected in a second edition.
 

rebracer

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Since this has been bumped, it got me thinking. With the rarity of Confederate photographs especially ones indicating camp life, weaponry and flags of any kind, these photos are very valuable and to have so many from this one unit. Does anyone know why there would be this large variety of photos of this unit ( I realize they were held in high esteem). Could there have been a photographer in close association with one or more of these men?

Any ideas?
 

AUG

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Since this has been bumped, it got me thinking. With the rarity of Confederate photographs especially ones indicating camp life, weaponry and flags of any kind, these photos are very valuable and to have so many from this one unit. Does anyone know why there would be this large variety of photos of this unit ( I realize they were held in high esteem). Could there have been a photographer in close association with one or more of these men?

Any ideas?
The full company photos of the Clinch Rifles and Oglethorpe Infantry, as well as a third of the Sumter Light Guards, were taken by Isaac Tucker and J. W. Perkins of the Photographic Gallery of Art in Augusta, GA.

According to Silent Witness: The Civil War through Photography and its Photographers by Ron Field, "Before they arrived at Camp Oglethorpe to join the 5th Georgia, the Clinch Rifles of Augusta were photographed by Tucker & Perkins. . . . On March 9, 1861, this firm photographed a flag presentation to the Clinch Rifles and five days later had an albumen print of the occasion 'suspended near the entrance to their Art Gallery.' They presented a copy of this photograph to the Rifles as they departed for Macon on May 7, 1861."

The description in The Photographic History of the Civil War Vol. 9 I think incorrectly has it labeled as taken at Macon near the armory, but I've seen an original albumen print of the Sumter Light Guards photo, taken at the exact same spot like the others, bearing the Tucker & Perkins studio stamp.

The camp photos of the Clinch Rifles might've been taken at Camp Oglethorpe outside Macon, GA, by local photographers R. L. Wood or J. A. Pugh.
 

John S. Carter

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The Clinch Rifles were organized as a militia company on March 22, 1851, from the Clinch Engine Company No. 2.The company was named for General Duncan L. Clinch the commander at the Battles of Withlacoochee [December 31, 1835] and The Cove [March 31, 1836] of The Seminole Wars.The company adopted the motto “Charge Again” after General Clinch’s order at the Battle of Withlacoochee [near the present town of Dunnellon, Florida] to attack the enemy again. This second attack routed the enemy and won the battle.

The Clinch Rifles served during the American Civil War as Company A, 5th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry.View attachment 8791View attachment 8792View attachment 8793
Very nice pictures.It amazes me how old pictures of pre 1900 can now be restored to the original .Do you have any further information on this unit,?
 

byron ed

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I find the image of the black man in the first image interesting. He appears to be wearing a military cap. Could he perhaps have been a combatant?
...by the standards of those that want it to be so, certainly this is a black Confederate soldier.
 
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One of the first casualties of the war was Hugh Parkin of the Clinch Rifles.

He found a red, black, and yellow snake and picked it up. It bit him a few times on the hand but the bit didn’t hurt so he didn’t think much of it.

He’d found a coral snake, so that was all Hugh wrote.
 

AUG

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Here's a photo of Clinch Rifles officers.

Clinch Rifles officers.jpg


Also a roster here: https://ranger95.com/civil_war/georgia/infantry/5ga_inf/5th_inf_regt_rost_a.html

These are likely the commissioned officers in the photo:

Platt, Charles A. -- Captain - May 11, 1861. Resigned, over-age, June 1862. Elected Lieutenant-Colonel of the 18th Battalion, Georgia State Guards Infantry July 1863. No later record.

Ansley, David Henry -- 1st Lieutenant - May 11, 1861. Elected Captain June 1862; Major December 31, 1862. Wounded and permanently disabled at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee November 25, 1863. Retired to Invalid Corps September 14, 1864. Retired permanently on account of wounds March 4, 1865.

Adam, Jacob W. -- 2nd Lieutenant - May 11, 1861. Resigned June 1862. Elected Captain of Company F, 18th Battalion, Georgia State Guards Infantry July 31, 1863. Roll for September 1863, last on file, shows him present. Elected Captain of Company K, 1st Regiment Local Defense Troops, Augusta, Georgia.

Day, Charles B. -- Jr. 2nd Lieutenant - May 11, 1861. Elected Lieutenant Colonel May 8, 1862. Resigned, disability, September 4, 1862.
 
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