CS Con Clapp, Jeremiah Watkins Sr. - C.S. Congressman, MS

Jeremiah Watkins Clapp Sr.

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Born: September 24, 1814

Birthplace: Abingdon, Virginia

Father: Dr. Earl Bourne Clapp 1772 – 1854
(Buried: Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Virginia)​

Mother: Elizabeth Craig 1775 – 1831
(Buried: Sinking Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Virginia)​

Wife: Evalina Donoho Lucas 1824 – 1907
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​

Children:

Climmie Lucas Clapp McCrosky 1844 – 1904​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​
Earl William Clapp 1848 – 1911​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​
Walker Lucas Clapp 1850 – 1901​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​
Jeremiah Watkins Clapp Jr. 1852 – 1923​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​
Eva Walton Clapp West 1854 – 1936​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​
Leura "Missie" Clapp Taylor 1858 – 1924​
(Buried: Riverside Cemetery, Jackson, Tennessee)​
Olie Bourne Clapp Steele 1867 – 1955​
(Buried: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee)​

Political Party: Whig Party, States Rights Party, Democratic Party

Education:


1836: Graduated from Hampden – Sydney College​

Occupation before War:

1839 – 1841: Attorney in Abingdon, Virginia​
Attorney in Holly Springs Mississippi and Memphis, Tennessee​
1852 – 1867: Trustee of University of Mississippi​
1854: Delegate to Charleston Convention
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1856 – 1858: Judge in the State of Mississippi​
1860: Presidential Elector for John C. Breckinridge Campaign​

Civil War Career:

1852 – 1867: Trustee of University of Mississippi​
1861: Member of Mississippi State Secession Convention​
1862 – 1864: Confederate States Congressman from Mississippi​
1862 – 1864: Member of House Claims Committee
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1862 – 1864: Member of House Elections Committee​
1862 – 1864: Member of House Ordnance and Ordnance Stores Committee​
Supported legislation aimed to strengthen the central government.​
1862: Introduced an important bill to compel the destruction or removal of property in the path of the enemy.​
He objected to drafting men over thirty – five​
His special legislative interest was to keep vice and fraud out of the military, and to see financial legislation was free inequities.​
1863: Unsuccessful Candidate for re-election to Confederate Congress​

Occupation after War:

Attorney in Holly Springs Mississippi and Memphis, Tennessee​
1852 – 1867: Trustee of University of Mississippi​
Elder of Old Second Presbyterian Church of Memphis, Tennessee​
Lived at his summer home in Hardin County, Tennessee​

Died: September 5, 1898

Place of Death: Memphis, Tennessee

Age at time of Death: 83 years old

Burial Place: Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee
 
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Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
After his career in the Confederate Congress was over Clapp oversaw the cotton production in Mississippi and parts of Alabama and Louisiana. It was his job to ensure that the cotton was turned into uniforms. He had been asked to take this job by Christopher Memminger.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
After his career in the Confederate Congress was over Clapp oversaw the cotton production in Mississippi and parts of Alabama and Louisiana. It was his job to ensure that the cotton was turned into uniforms. He had been asked to take this job by Christopher Memminger.
Clapp was later offered the same job as"cotton overseer" for the Union after he was forced to turn over the cotton to general Edward Canby in New Orleans.It was Canby who made the offer.
 
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