Civil Warf Stories, Ambrose Bierce

johan_steele

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#1
<u>Civil War Stories</u> by Ambrose Bierce a Civil War Union veteran himself is a look into the war through the eyes and experiances of a man who was there. Full of wit and emotion this is a wonderful read, it is also a must own for anyone interested in the life of the men who fought the Civil War. I picked this book up again and reread it enjoying it as much as the first time I read it. It's a quick read and not a slogging effort to turn the page, any student of literature and history will likely enjoy this work.
 

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gary

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#2
Isn't that a historical novel? I think I have it myself but am deferring for non-fiction.
 

mobile_96

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#3
Editorial Reviews (As Per Amazon.com)
Product Description:
Sixteen dark and vivid selections by great satirist and short-story writer. "A Horseman in the Sky," "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge," "Chickamauga," "A Son of the Gods," "What I Saw of Shiloh," "Four Days in Dixie" and 10 more. Masterly tales offer excellent examples of Bierce’s dark pessimism and storytelling power. Note.
Fiction, but based on Ambrose's experiences in the war. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge being by far the most famous story from this book.
 

ewc

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#5
I have this work. Lent it to my brother to read and it became his favorite Civil War book. Bierce had schooled briefly as a lad at the Kentucky Military Institute, apprenticed to an abolitionist printer, and was one of the very early volunteers to the military, full of the patriotic and selfless fervor of these early volunteers on both sides. Initially a private, he soon received a commission once the regiment (9th Indiana) reenlisted, and for a good part of the war was on the staff of General William Hazen. His initial zeal to ultimate disillusionment over the course of the war is very well reflected in his dark probing stories. His stories show the idiocies, useless sacrifice, dark existential ironies, and grim faceless humor of one who has been there and seen these things- and he is a brilliant observer. There is not much hint of the glory of war in his writings. He recognizes the splendid bravery and sacrifices of the men, their honor and sense of duty, the fine leadership of their (but not nearly enough) officers and commanders, but all to what avail?, is his ultimate anguish. There is a fine sense of 'I'm trying my best to do my duty, and I'll die if I have to, but what I really want is to be the hell away from all this. And, my God, why o why must you taunt me??' He moves from numbness to howling outrage as one who has suffered beyond human endurance, hauntingly so.
 



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