Ami's SOA Civil War Quilts: Era, Commemorative, Inspired

chellers

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#41
darien hat quilt cwt.jpg


Norwalk Hat Factory quilt
1860
Silk

The Darien (Connecticut) Historical Society’s 1860 Norwalk Hat Factory quilt is a most stunning, pieced quilt in a “rail fence” pattern made of colorful silk that was used in hat linings from a Norwalk hat factory.

Consisting of 1,680 silk bars of about 3 3/4 by 5/8 inches each.

http://www.pinterest.com/willemkev/antique-quilts/
 
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#44
This quilt was given to me by my grandmother and great Aunt. Aunt Ella said it was "Mama's quilt" and when they were children they called it the "Railroad Quilt" and played on it. Both women were born in the early 1880's so that tells you something of the age., probably the 1870's but perhaps a little earlier.

It is a variation of the New York Beauty, also in the South called Rocky Mountain Road, Richmond Beauty, and Georgia Beauty. If you look closely you will see four stitched oak leaves N-S-E-W around each star centered on the white background. I included a pic of the back of the quilt where they show up better in a photo.

railroad  quilt(1).jpg


railroad quilt1(1).jpg


photo(48)(1).JPG
 
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JPK Huson 1863

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#45
Oh my gosh RobertP, thanks VERY much for another pick from the P's Civil War Museum and Americana PWickapedia-3D, Gee whiz. Lovely, my goodness. I was hoping Cheller's thread would lure you here. It's super to see these old works of textile art in museums, it feels different, doesn't it, when displayed by folks who not only own them but are vastly familiar with them as things they just grew up with.

You could use any of these quilts on the flip side if you wished to- and it's REALLY tough to do that when sewing- keep the underneath as beautiful as the top.
 
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#46
Oh my gosh RobertP, thanks VERY much for another pick from the P's Civil War Museum and Americana PWickapedia-3D, Gee whiz. Lovely, my goodness. I was hoping Cheller's thread would lure you here. It's super to see these old works of textile art in museums, it feels different, doesn't it, when displayed by folks who not only own them but are vastly familiar with them as things they just grew up with.

You could use any of these quilts on the flip side if you wished to- and it's REALLY tough to do that when sewing- keep the underneath as beautiful as the top.
Hi JPK, and thanks for the compliments. I know people say you shouldn't hang old quilts but we've had this on up on an Amish style rack in three different houses over the last nearly 30 years. It's out of direct sunlight and is no worse for wear.

Thought you might like this one, because it has a quilt it is on topic. The quilt on the bed is a Grandmother's Garden pattern, prevalent early 20th century one but my g-grandmother on the other side made so I like it. The bed is a baby's crib, it was used by the my grandmother and a couple of years later her sister, my Aunt Ella, both mentioned before with the Railroad Quilt, in the 1880's. The canopy-tester was added by Dad in the 1980's after the style of our then baby son's crib. It is easily removed, making the crib a simple four poster. The pic was taken in my parents' old house. Mom kept games, puzzles etc. on the bed for visit activities.


photo(49)(1).JPG
 
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chellers

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#47
This quilt was given to me by my grandmother and great Aunt. Aunt Ella said it was "Mama's quilt" and when they were children they called it the "Railroad Quilt" and played on it. Both women were born in the early 1880's so that tells you something of the age., probably the 1870's but perhaps a little earlier.

It is a variation of the New York Beauty, also in the South called Rocky Mountain Road, Richmond Beauty, and Georgia Beauty. If you look closely you will see four stitched oak leaves N-S-E-W around each star centered on the white background. I included a pic of the back of the quilt where they show up better in a photo.

View attachment 37317

View attachment 37316

View attachment 37318
Oh my, RobertP, your family heirlooms are beautiful. Thank you much for posting.
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#54
Hi JPK, and thanks for the compliments. I know people say you shouldn't hang old quilts but we've had this on up on an Amish style rack in three different houses over the last nearly 30 years. It's out of direct sunlight and is no worse for wear.

Thought you might like this one, because it has a quilt it is on topic. The quilt on the bed is a Grandmother's Garden pattern, prevalent early 20th century one but my g-grandmother on the other side made so I like it. The bed is a baby's crib, it was used by the my grandmother and a couple of years later her sister, my Aunt Ella, both mentioned before with the Railroad Quilt, in the 1880's. The canopy-tester was added by Dad in the 1980's after the style of our then baby son's crib. It is easily removed, making the crib a simple four poster. The pic was taken in my parents' old house. Mom kept games, puzzles etc. on the bed for visit activities.


View attachment 37322

Oh my, RobertP, your family heirlooms are beautiful. Thank you much for posting.
Ditto- I'd missed that, thank you! Oh my goodness- seems to me some kind of book/historically based novel, with photos running through your rooms on these items would be amazingggg. It's just crazy, the amount of sheer History you and your wife are in care over every day. Unlike a lot of historic novels, only thing you'd have to invent on this one would be dialog. Really, really glad you folks keep and enjoy them- Dad once had a shot at giving an item to the Harrisburg museum here, went to ask about it, found it in a store room with a zillion others, so he took it home. Hee- Mr. and Mrs. P's Civil War Emporium and Pickipedia- swear! It may sound flip, do not mean to- also do not mean to be SO nosy, just do appreciate it, that you tend to allow us into your home so much, or a family home.

You know, there are all these rules and things, the shock/horror stuff you're not ever, ever supposed to do with some of the old items? You'd never SEE any of them if you went by a lot of them, what would be the point? I don't know- I've seen quilts and things, all matted, behind glass, layers and layers between you and it- or rugs, or furniture no one can touch, silver perennially unpolished, lace never felt- list is endless. Especially if the plan is not to sell it- ( yes, I understand there are conditions collectors insist on..... ) it's nice to have your old things at some kind of level between protection and NOT in mothballs in the trunk in controlled conditions. Like I said, what is the point?

I LIKE living in amongst old things. My husband's view is slightly different- he'd rather they were not broken or tatty- to me that's charming. We compromise- kinda. OK, well when he NOTICES something is tatty, I'll put it away. :whistling:
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#56
This is called the ' Soldier's Quilt ' pattern- or just ' Soldier's Quilt '? I couldn't find anything more on it, which is was, from Etsey- sometimes you get a great blurb attached, sometimes not very much. I tend to like quilts which must have been a little plain, too- the ones probably used heavily in a home, have a load of History over cold nights.

cw soldiers quilt pattern.jpg
 



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