Civil War humor and marriage

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NH Civil War Gal

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This is from "The Common Soldier of the Civil War" magazine, 1973.

One of the most notable traits of Civil War soldiers was their humor. Their sensitivity to the ludicrous and the spontaneity of their mirth gave them escape from their troubles and made the hardships of soldiering more tolerable. Rebs and Yanks liked to tease realitive and friends in the letters. Private William R. Stilwell of Georgia, after a year's absence from home wrote his wife: "If I did not write and receive letters from you I believe that I would forgit that I was marrid. I dont feel much like a maryed man but I never forgit it sofar as to court enny other lady, but if I should you must forgive me as I am so forgitful."

William Sprinle, a North Carolina Reb, wrote a young married man of his home community: "Thomy I want you to be good and tri to take cear of the wemmen and childern tell I get home and we'll all have a chance...I want you to go...and see my wife and childern, but I want you to take your wife with you when you go."

And an Ohioan who lacked postage because of arrearage of pay wrote on an envelope addressed to his homefolk:
Postmaster please to pass this through,
I've nary a cent, but three months due.
 
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TnFed

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You know NH, I had a Confederate ancestor that was forgetful like that man in the first letter. After the war he took a trip to Oklahoma . Out there he got amnesia and forgot he was married...twice...two kids from two different women

When he came back home he never brought it up till he was dying. He look at his wife and started to confess his every sin as he lay there. Old aunt Jane just looked at him and said "roll over James and die easy."
 
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Tom Elmore

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Gaston Lewis and Wharton Jackson Green on the staff of Brig. Gen. Junius Daniel were marching northward through Front Royal in late June 1863, when they stopped for some buttermilk offered by two ladies. As the soldiers passed nearby, one of them called out, "Come out of that, you know you have got a wife and baby at home; and if you don't, I'll tell on you." The cry was taken up along the column until the last man. One of the young ladies then said, "I need not ask which one of you it is, for your countenance has fastened it on you," pointing to Green. (Wharton Jackson Green, Recollections and Reflections)
 

TnFed

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Gaston Lewis and Wharton Jackson Green on the staff of Brig. Gen. Junius Daniel were marching northward through Front Royal in late June 1863, when they stopped for some buttermilk offered by two ladies. As the soldiers passed nearby, one of them called out, "Come out of that, you know you have got a wife and baby at home; and if you don't, I'll tell on you." The cry was taken up along the column until the last man. One of the young ladies then said, "I need not ask which one of you it is, for your countenance has fastened it on you," pointing to Green. (Wharton Jackson Green, Recollections and Reflections)
Always someone to tell on ya..:smile:
 
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