Civil war era Armory in Leonia NJ, Bergen county.

Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
Hey folks, I was searching around the internet and found that there was a Civil war era Armory and Drill hall in Leonia NJ. Anyone know anything about it?

Do you guys know much about Armories in the 19th century? Did all counties have them for citizens? If so did townships have Armories aswell? Did a county have to apply for an Armory? Does anyone know anything about the topic?

armory.jpg
 

Story

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Location
SE PA
Per the sign out front -
Built in 1859 by
“Jersey Blues Company”
of the English Neighborhood. Troops that trained here became Company 1 of the 22nd New Jersey Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. Other troops trained here served during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Used as an armory until about 1910.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
Per the sign out front -
Built in 1859 by
“Jersey Blues Company”
of the English Neighborhood. Troops that trained here became Company 1 of the 22nd New Jersey Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. Other troops trained here served during the Spanish-American War in 1898. Used as an armory until about 1910.
Dope! lol
 

kotkinjs1

Private
Joined
May 25, 2017
Wow. I grew up not far from there and remember passing that building every week when I was a kid. I haven't thought about it in decades and never remembered it once my love for ACW history grew. Thanks for the memories and the history lesson!
 

kotkinjs1

Private
Joined
May 25, 2017
Found this on the web about NJ's 22nd Inf Regiment.....did this happen often in the Union Army? To call up and train a whole regiment only to disband it 9 months later as the war was still progressing? It didn't even see much action.

"Twenty-second Infantry. — Col., Abraham G. Demarest ; Lieut.-Cols., Alexander Douglas, Abraham Van Emburgh ; Maj., Samuel D. Demarest. This regiment, composed almost exclusively of volunteers from the county of Bergen, was mustered into service at Trenton on Sept. 22, 1862, and left for Washington seven days later, arriving safely after some detentions and going into camp on East Capitol hill. About the last of November, after being brigaded with the 29th, 30th and 31st N. J., and 137th Pa. regiments, it proceeded by way of Port Tobacco to Liverpool Point, whence it crossed, on Dec. 5, to Acquia creek, the march being one of great difficulty, taxing the endurance of the men to the utmost, their sufferings being increased upon their arrival by a cold and pitiless storm, which continued for two days. Early in Jan., 1863, the regiment was ordered to report to the 3d brigade, 1st division, 1st army corps, and accordingly proceeded to Belle Plain, where it remained for some time. It was slightly engaged in the battle of Chancellorsville and a few days subsequently it proceeded to Centerville and was released from the service. Continuing its march to Washington, it departed thence by rail to Trenton, arriving there on June 22 and a few days later was finally disbanded, after nine months' service."
 
Last edited:

kotkinjs1

Private
Joined
May 25, 2017
Back to your original question about armories in general, they were totally paid for and built by the local communities or counties as home guard facilities and training and administration centers. No real federal involvement or decision making I believe. But since militias were the primary recruiting source the country relied on them heavily for things like the ACW and Indian Wars. It wasn't until much later (under Teddy Roosevelt I think?) that law was written that changed the nature of a large standing army versus a national guard/reserve force. When local militias became the National Guard the armories built in that timeframe (during/after the SAW), they became the bigger architectural layouts in stone or brick mostly still seen today.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Location
Texas
Back to your original question about armories in general, they were totally paid for and built by the local communities or counties as home guard facilities and training and administration centers. No real federal involvement or decision making I believe. But since militias were the primary recruiting source the country relied on them heavily for things like the ACW and Indian Wars. It wasn't until much later (under Teddy Roosevelt I think?) that law was written that changed the nature of a large standing army versus a national guard/reserve force. When local militias became the National Guard the armories built in that timeframe (during/after the SAW), they became the bigger architectural layouts in stone or brick mostly still seen today.
Wow, very interesting.
 
Top