Civil War books yet to be written?

Belfoured

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
It is hard to see. But it disappeared in other places, Brazil for example. I confess I don’t know all the particulars regarding emancipation in Brazil and other locales. But to believe slavery would not have ended at some point without a war is to suggest it would still be with us today without a war. And no one really believes that, do they?

I’ve heard different ideas about when it would have seen it’s natural death but the era of America’s expansion onto the world stage as an international power seems likely. So maybe 1890-1910 or so.

I digress. I went off in the weeds.
One of the issues in Brazil was that manumission was easier in Brazil than in the US and had been so for a good while. But the whole thing is probably unknowable, which ensures that any prediction about this is even more speculative than usual. The only thing we can reject pretty much out of hand is that slavery's end in the South was already underway by 1861. It clearly was not.
 

Grant's Tomb

Corporal
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Two biographies that I can think of would include Kershaw, the South Carolina officer. He was active at both Gettysburg and Chickamauga and performed capably.

A bio on Archibald Gracie, the Confederate Br. Gen. He was a West Pointer, was originally from the northeast, joined the Confederate Army as a business decision. He performed well at Chickamauga and in the trenches of Petersburg.
His grandfather purchased land along the East River in New York where Carl Schurz Park is located and built the Gracie Mansion house that became the residence of the Mayor. His son Archibald Gracie IV survived the sinking of the Titanic but never recovered from the ordeal and died on December 4, 1912, becoming the first survivor to die.
 

speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Gracie IV wrote a biography of his CSA general father. He was in Europe to relax after publishing the book. He gave away copies on the Titanic.
On Titanic, Gracie IV pushed copies of his book The Truth About Chickamauga on people to read. He gave nothing away for free. The book is not a biography of Gracie III, it is a history of the battle.
 

speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Where did his Truth of Chickamauga fit in?
There was no biography of Gracie III by Gracie IV. To the time he boarded Titanic, his only book was The Truth About Chickamauga. He later wrote The Truth About Titanic. Both books are research classics. While hard to read, both books are important works for researchers of those specific fields. Gracie's papers, which are available through the Alabama Department of Archives and History are an extraordinary resource and they are virtually unused by students of the battle. I used them heavily.
 

Eric Wittenberg

1st Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Location
Columbus, OH
Scott Mingus and I wrote that--2 volumes, 250,000+ words--last year. It will have 55 maps and about 150 images. Ted Savas has volume 1 and is soon going to get started with it.
I am told that volume 1 will be published spring 2022 and volume 2 will follow in the fall of 2022. That comes from Ted himself, so I think we can probably count on it.
 

speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
The logistics backdrop for the Confederate army. The supplies on hand, efforts to increase them, efforts to find substitutes, efforts to get them to where they were required, etc. These supplies would be corn, meat, iron, copper, nitre, horses, hides, cloth, ......
You might try Civil War Logistics by Earl J Hess. I have not read that one but Hess always does a good job.
 

speedylee

Corporal
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
I've read the book and it only hits the surface of what I'd like to see.
Don't take this the wrong way: Do the research and write it yourself. It can be a long road but the journey is usually worth it, whether you get published or not. That's how mine got written: I had a question I could not answer without doing the research myself.
 

DaveBrt

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
Don't take this the wrong way: Do the research and write it yourself. It can be a long road but the journey is usually worth it, whether you get published or not. That's how mine got written: I had a question I could not answer without doing the research myself.
Agreed, that is how my web site and first book came to be. I'm working on book 2 and don't have the time to work on my desired one.
 

Eric Wittenberg

1st Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Location
Columbus, OH
Hi, Eric:

Will this cover the invasion up to the battle or the entire campaign? Either way, I'm looking forward to reading it. Thanks.
We begin with setting the stage for the invasion, and then cover each day of the campaign, beginning with the first movements by the Confederates on June 3, and ending on the night of June 30. Each day is addressed in its own chapter. We cover the entire invasion, all fighting during the advance to Gettysburg, including Brandy Station, Second Winchester, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, the skirmishes around Gettysburg, at Wrightsville involving Early's division, the fighting in Camp Hill involving Jenkins' command, the fight at McConnellsburg, and the various actions during Stuart's advance. We also cover the Union movements under John A. Dix intended to threaten Richmond. We cover things from the military, political, and civilian perspectives, and even include foreign press coverage. Combining our efforts with several others, we have compiled the most complete and accurate order of battle, timed for the night of June 30, 1863, ever attempted. There are 55 maps and about 150 images. That's why this manuscript has to be broken into two volumes, since, when all is said and done, it's about 1100 pages of material.
 

AA484

Private
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
We begin with setting the stage for the invasion, and then cover each day of the campaign, beginning with the first movements by the Confederates on June 3, and ending on the night of June 30. Each day is addressed in its own chapter. We cover the entire invasion, all fighting during the advance to Gettysburg, including Brandy Station, Second Winchester, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, the skirmishes around Gettysburg, at Wrightsville involving Early's division, the fighting in Camp Hill involving Jenkins' command, the fight at McConnellsburg, and the various actions during Stuart's advance. We also cover the Union movements under John A. Dix intended to threaten Richmond. We cover things from the military, political, and civilian perspectives, and even include foreign press coverage. Combining our efforts with several others, we have compiled the most complete and accurate order of battle, timed for the night of June 30, 1863, ever attempted. There are 55 maps and about 150 images. That's why this manuscript has to be broken into two volumes, since, when all is said and done, it's about 1100 pages of material.
Sounds spectacular; looking forward to it!
 
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