Civil War Battle Scene


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Aug 2, 2011
Messages
445
Location
Charleston, SC
#3
I have found some great pictures on this site (which I stumbled upon by accident by the way). I live in Charleston SC, so the pictures of the downtown area, and especially the Battery, are a little astonishing to see. The pictures of Charleston Harbor are completely unreal - so odd to my modern eyes to not see the huge bridges, the port and terminals, the buildings, the large container ships or luxury yachts ... if I weren't afraid of horses, I would say I was born in the wrong century. Even (literally) shell-shocked, I wish I were here back then instead of now :eek:.
 

Lnwlf

2nd Lieutenant
Retired Moderator
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
2,475
Location
SOUTHERN Indiana
#4
That is a great site, thanks for the link. I don't think Wilber has worked his magic on this one yet but when he sees it he will! The site has a bunch of ACW picture I have not seen and will prove to be a gold mine for the photography threads here at CWT!
 

Dave Hull

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 28, 2011
Messages
1,774
Location
Northern Virginia
#5
That picture was taken about 6 miles from my house. A real shame that all that history has been plowed under for strip malls. condos and town houses.
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,465
Location
Virginia
#7
Lnwlf,

I think Wilber did blow up/enhance the photograph--but, it is probably buried somewhere too deep to find and--its not bad repeating photographs, as new folks join.

:smile:

M. E. Wolf
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,465
Location
Virginia
#8
BillO,

You wrote:
Hello Dave, a question, you give your location as Northern Virginia yet you live 6 miles from Fair Oaks?
We have a "Fair Oaks" in Northern Virginia however--the Fair Oaks that is probably confusing concerning the photograph is due in part to the "Station" is missing off the caption. "Fair Oaks Station" by the York River Railroad, not far from Richmond.

Like I warn folks in my introduction to new recruits--so many places are called the same, so you have to be more 'detailed' in describing. And, it is a common flaw as so many are unaware how many "Plank Roads" there are in Virginia... Richmond, Fredericksburg and elsewhere. Oh...and there are a few "Long Bridges" in Virginia too-- :thumbsup:

M. E. Wolf
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,465
Location
Virginia
#9
Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 3 (Regimental Histories)
UNITED STATES--REGULAR ARMY.
BATTERY "C" 3rd ARTILLERY.
At San Francisco, Cal,, till October, 1861. Ordered to New York October 14, 1861; thence moved to Washington, D.C. Attached to Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. (Attached to Battery "G" May to October, 1862.) 1st Brigade, Horse Artillery, Artillery Reserve, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. Artillery, Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to November, 1862. (Battery "G" broken up October, 1862.) Bayard's Cavalry Brigade, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1863. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863. 2nd Regular Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Horse Artillery, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1864. (Consolidated with Batteries "F" and "K" from March, 1864.) Horse Artillery, Army of the Shenandoah, Middle Military Division, to December, 1864. Horse Artillery, Reserve, Army of the Shenandoah, to April, 1865. Horse Artillery Brigade, 22nd Army Corps, to August, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the Defences of Washington, D. C., till March, 1862. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Operations about White House June 26-July 2. Rejoined army via Gloucester Point. Malvern Hill August 5. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Middletown, Md., September 13. Battle of Antietam, Md., September 16-17. Shepherdstown Ford September 19. Aldie October 31. Mountsville October 31. New Baltimore, Salem and Thoroughfare Gap November 4. Rappahannock Station November 7-9. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Aldie June 17. Middleburg June 19. Upperville June 22. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Smithburg, Md., July 5. Jones' Cross Roads, near Williamsport, July 10-13. Robertson's Ford September 23. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Rappahannock Bridge November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Kilpatrick's Raid on Richmond February 28-March 4, 1864. Fortifications of Richmond March 1. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Wilderness May 5-7. Spottsylvania Court House May 8-21. Salem Church May 27. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Siege of Petersburg June 16 to August 5. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Sheridan's Shenandoah Campaign August 7-November 28. Near Winchester August 11. Near Kearneysville August 25. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley till April, 1865. In Defences of Washington till August, 1865.
 

BillO

Captain
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
6,346
Location
Quinton, VA.
#10
BillO,

You wrote:


We have a "Fair Oaks" in Northern Virginia however--the Fair Oaks that is probably confusing concerning the photograph is due in part to the "Station" is missing off the caption. "Fair Oaks Station" by the York River Railroad, not far from Richmond.

Like I warn folks in my introduction to new recruits--so many places are called the same, so you have to be more 'detailed' in describing. And, it is a common flaw as so many are unaware how many "Plank Roads" there are in Virginia... Richmond, Fredericksburg and elsewhere. Oh...and there are a few "Long Bridges" in Virginia too-- :thumbsup:

M. E. Wolf
I didn't know that, I wasn't taking a shot I was just curious. I was assuming by the date that the Fair Oaks in the picture was the one near Richmond.
 

Lnwlf

2nd Lieutenant
Retired Moderator
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
2,475
Location
SOUTHERN Indiana
#11
Lnwlf,

I think Wilber did blow up/enhance the photograph--but, it is probably buried somewhere too deep to find and--its not bad repeating photographs, as new folks join.

:smile:

M. E. Wolf
Thanks for the tip ME! I will go dig around the archives and see if it is there and bump it out for folks to see.
 

Lnwlf

2nd Lieutenant
Retired Moderator
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
2,475
Location
SOUTHERN Indiana
#12
Thanks for the tip ME! I will go dig around the archives and see if it is there and bump it out for folks to see.
Drat! It is not in the 4 pages of photo threads. HMMMMMMMMMMMMMM? Eastern Theatre perhaps??? In the meantime... Where's Wilber?
 

Dave Hull

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 28, 2011
Messages
1,774
Location
Northern Virginia
#13
Northern Virginia seems to be growing all the time. When I was young it was Fairfax and Arlington counties. Now it stretches almost to Winchester down just above Richmond. A few years back they decided that the Metropolitan area of Virginia, DC and Maryland would run from Baltimore to Fredericksburg.

I guess it is like talking about the Mixing Bowel. Most people you talk to now call the Mixing Bowel the god awful intersection of I95-395 and 495 in Springfield. The real Mixing Bowel was up in Shirlington.

In answer to your question, I just glanced at the picture and did not notice a date, saw Fair Oaks and went with that. The pictures looked a lot like what that area used to look like when I was young. Kind of like the town of Centerville. When we used to go to my grandparents farm in Highland county on the weekend, we drove through Centerville, past the Hardware store and the Fire House, the only buildings in the town. I still occasionally take 29/211 when we head down to the Valley to stay off I66, but my wife hates the twisty turny roads on 211.
 

wilber6150

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Apr 1, 2009
Messages
19,353
Location
deep in the Mohawk Valley of Central New York
#14
Lnwlf,

I think Wilber did blow up/enhance the photograph--but, it is probably buried somewhere too deep to find and--its not bad repeating photographs, as new folks join.

:smile:

M. E. Wolf
Hi all, I dont thinkwe have done this one yet.. We did a couple of mounted artillery units but not this one.... I will see if I can dig up a good download to work on..
 

M E Wolf

Colonel
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
17,465
Location
Virginia
#15
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/1 [S# 12]
MAY 4, 1862.--Skirmishes near Williamsburg, Va.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XI/1 [S# 12]
MAY 4, 1862.--Skirmishes near Williamsburg, Va.
No. 6. -- Report of Capt. Horatio G. Gibson, Third U. S. Artillery.
LIGHT COMPANY C, THIRD ARTILLERY,
Camp at Williamsburg, Va., May 6, 1862.
SIR: I have the honor to report the operations of my battery in the engagement with the enemy near this place on the 4th instant:

Soon after passing Yorktown I received orders to detach a section under Lieut. W. D. Fuller to the front. A few miles in advance some of the enemy fired upon the head of our column, and Lieutenant Fuller at once came into action, and drove them from their cover just as I arrived with the rest of the battery on the ground with orders from General Stoneman to report to General Cooke and remain with him. The march was resumed, and on entering the woods near our last camp the whole battery was again ordered forward.

On arriving at the head of our column I found Lieutenant Fuller already engaged with the enemy, firing from the road on the skirt of the timber. By direction of General Cooke I ordered the section to be moved forward on the right of the road, and also brought the other sections into battery in the field on the left. I discovered a large body of the enemy (artillery, cavalry, and infantry) moving from the enemy's work in front to another on our right. I at once opened a rapid and steady fire upon them, and continued it so long as they were in sight and with considerable effect, and then directed the fire of the guns on both works. The enemy returned it rapidly and with serious effect, disabling the battery at nearly every shot. The line of the woods around us formed a crescent, partially inclosing the field in which the battery was posted. The ground was very miry and boggy, particularly on the edge of the timber, where my caissons were placed, in charge of Lieutenant D'Wolf, and the wheels sunk into the mud nearly to their axles. In this hazardous position, with a cross-fire of the enemy upon me, with no infantry support, I kept my guns in play for nearly an hour, and until I had expended about 250 rounds of ammunition.

Orders were then given by General Cooke to withdraw the battery, which was commenced by Lieutenant Fuller on the right, and followed by me with the other sections on the left. I succeeded in getting them all into the timber, except the last, which, having lost two of the horses, sunk in a boggy hole near the road. I sent Lieutenant Meinell to overtake the battery and bring teams to haul it out, and also the caissons mired down and disabled in horses; but this officer, being dismounted (his horse wounded), was unable to do to as quickly as it was necessary to save them. After occupying nearly twenty minutes in fruitless efforts, with ten horses attached, to extricate the piece, by the repeated advice of Lieutenant Colonel Grier and Captain Davis (as the rebel cavalry was close upon us) and the fire of all the enemy's guns concentrated upon us), I abandoned it with reluctance and retired with Captain Davis' squadron. At the same time Lieutenant Pendleton, seeing the helpless condition of the caissons, and that they could not be saved until the piece which obstructed the road was removed, ordered the drivers to retire with their teams.

I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of my officers and men. Under a hot and incessant fire from the enemy, shot and shell flying thick and fast around them, they stood gallantly to their posts without flinching. Lieutenant Fuller served his pieces bravely and handsomely, and Lieut. E. Pendleton and H. Meinell, chiefs of sections, and Lieut. William D'Wolf, chief of the line of caissons, more immediately under my eye, were cool, gallant and efficient in the discharge of their important duties. The latter, while remaining manfully at his exposed and inactive post under a severe fire, was dangerously wounded in two places, and as he was leaving the field had his horse killed under him.

Though almost all of my men behaved more than creditably, especially the non-commissioned officers, yet I am unable to speak of any one in particular except Sergt.. G. A. Niforth, whose gallant exertions to bring off his piece at no ordinary risk I deem worthy of especial notice.

After I left the First Cavalry in the woods I learn that they were charged by a regiment of the enemy's cavalry, whom they repulsed and charged upon in handsome style. Private John Thompson, Company G, Third Artillery, of my battery, reports that in the melee he took a standard from one of the enemy, but was sabered by one of our own men and compelled to give it up.

My loss in the action was 1 officer and 4 men wounded, I slightly. I also lost 17 horses killed, 6 at one fire in a caisson, and 5 wounded. I abandoned one piece, three caissons, and one caisson body, of which I have since recovered all except the piece and caisson.

The enemy, I am informed, lost from the effects of my fire 6 killed and 7 wounded and quite a number of horses. I should judge that the fire of at least eight guns was concentrated upon my battery--two large ship carronades and two rifled guns.

I am deeply sensible of the misfortune that I met with in the loss of my piece and caisson, but all those on the spot will bear witness that I made every effort to prevent it, and that I remained by them until I was obliged to give up all hope of saving them. I am much indebted to Capt. B. F. Davis and his squadron of the First Cavalry for their support and assistance under a severe fire concentrated upon them, and only regret that it was unavailing.

I forgot to mention that Lieut. J. W. Upham, Ninth New York Cavalry, attached to the battery, was left in rear in charge of the battery wagon and forge.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
H. G. GIBSON,
Captain Third Artillery, Commanding Battery.
First Lieut. J.P. MARTIN,
Seventh U.S. Infantry, A. A. A. G.
------------
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/2 [S# 40]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From January 26 To June 2, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#1
[excerpt]
CAVALRY.
Brig. Gen. DAVID McM. GREGG.
District of Columbia (independent company), Lieut. William H. Orton.
1st Maine, Lieut. Col. C. S. Douty.
1st New Jersey, Maj. M. H. Beaumont.
2d New York, Col. J. Kilpatrick.
10th New York, Maj. M. H. Avery.
1st Pennsylvania, Maj. D. Gardner.
3d U.S. Artillery, Battery C, Capt. H. G. Gibson.

Gibson would prompted to the position of :

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 46.
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
Cincinnati, Ohio, April 20, 1863.
Capt. H. G. Gibson, Third U.S. Artillery, is announced as chief of artillery for the Army of the Ohio. He will be obeyed and respected accordingly.
By command of Major-General Burnside:
LEWIS RICHMOND,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
-----
Fast forward...

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.(*)--#3
GENERAL ORDERS No. 21.
HDQRS. DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE,
Knoxville, Tenn., March 22, 1865.
I. During the absence in the field of the major-general commanding, Col. H. G. Gibson, Second Ohio Heavy Artillery, will, in addition to his other duties, take charge of office of district headquarters and attend to the current business in the name of the general commanding. This does not contemplate the authorizing of any changes in the standing orders from these headquarters.
By command of Major-General Stoneman:
G. M. BASCOM,
Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.
--------------
Fast Forward:
Gibson, Horatio Gates - Col., 2nd Regt. Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery
Brevet Brig. Gen. U.S.V. March 13 1865
(Not bad for being a Captain in 3rd U.S. Artillery, holding that commission and then given a Colonel rank and commission from Ohio..then gets a Brevet-Brigadier-General as an 'atta boy.')
 

Lnwlf

2nd Lieutenant
Retired Moderator
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
Messages
2,475
Location
SOUTHERN Indiana
#16
Hi all, I dont thinkwe have done this one yet.. We did a couple of mounted artillery units but not this one.... I will see if I can dig up a good download to work on..
I was begining to wonder if you were going to find this thread Will! Lots of things of interest in this photo. I hope you can do something with it.
 
Joined
Sep 6, 2011
Messages
2
Location
Exeter, Ca
#18
That is a great site...I love those pictures. I have aquestion though....I notice in a lot of the pics the gentlemen have a hand in the frontt of their coat...ala napoleon. What is the purpose of that? Anyone know? Thank you very much.
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
34,452
Location
Near Kankakee
#20
That is a great site...I love those pictures. I have aquestion though....I notice in a lot of the pics the gentlemen have a hand in the frontt of their coat...ala napoleon. What is the purpose of that? Anyone know? Thank you very much.
I'd always thought it was a way to keep one hand still.
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top