GRAPHIC Civil War Amputees

Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Messages
1,442
Left to right: A.J. Hutchins, Co. "K" 25th Ohio Vols; Thomas Shields, Co. "G" 62nd N.Y. Vols; William H. McFarland, Co. "B" 5th Wisconsin Vols; S.M. Dyer, Co "I" 5th Wisconsin Vols; V.N. Higgins, Co. "H" 2nd Maine Vols.

The perspectives of surgeons, physicians, and nurses are richly documented in the history of Civil War medicine, which highlights the heroism and brutality of battlefield operations and the challenges of caring for the wounded during wartime. Yet the experiences of injured soldiers during the conflict and in the years afterwards are less well-known.

More than three million soldiers fought in the war from 1861-1865. More than half a million died, and almost as many were wounded but survived. Hundreds of thousands were permanently disabled by battlefield injuries or surgery, which saved lives by sacrificing limbs. Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War explores the experiences of disabled Civil War veterans who served as a symbol of the fractured nation and a stark reminder of the costs of the conflict.

Photo and text courtesy of the National Library of Medicine.

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Mrs. V

First Sergeant
Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
1,494
If you have a strong stomach, there are surgical journals out there, that describe how best to amputate and where on the limb to do it. Prosthetic technology grew by leaps and bounds, (sorry) during this time as well.

The wonderful and awful fact is that many modern limb saving techniques grew out of battle injuries, and fieled surgical techniques. As well as soft tissue damage management and " keep em alive to they can be evaced".
 


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