Civil rights groups declare New Year’s Day ‘Emancipation [Proclamation] Day’

Belle Montgomery

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#1
Jan. 1 is more than New Year’s Day.

It’s also Emancipation Day, civil rights groups across the nation have declared.

New Year’s Day is the 156th anniversary of the date in 1863 on which the Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln took effect, freeing African-Americans from slavery.

This year also marks the 400th anniversary of the first documented arrival of slaves kidnapped from Africa into the torturous journey to American shores via a barbaric, trans-Atlantic slave trade, Rainbow PUSH Coalition Founder/President Rev. Jesse Jackson said Monday.

REST OF ARTICLE: https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/c...-new-years-day-emancipation-proclamation-day/
 

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#2
The Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln took effect, freeing African-Americans from slavery.

I question the veracity of this claim

From the EP " left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. "

This little footnote has always given credence to the argument if the north was fighting to free the slaves why didn't the north free the slaves in the north ?
 

Irishtom29

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#3
This little footnote has always given credence to the argument if the north was fighting to free the slaves why didn't the north free the slaves in the north ?
Well the United States wasn’t originally fighting to free the enslaved but to suppress rebellion and crush treason. But freeing the enslaved was certainly a beneficial effect of the war, don’t you think?
 

Pat Young

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#4
All through the South after the end of the war, African Americans celebrated January 1 as Emancipation Day. They understood that it marked a sea change in their status within the United States. Not sure why so many people have trouble understanding that.
 

Irishtom29

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#6
All through the South after the end of the war, African Americans celebrated January 1 as Emancipation Day. They understood that it marked a sea change in their status within the United States. Not sure why so many people have trouble understanding that.
Pat, I think many people understand it but don’t accept it.
 

jackt62

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#7
The Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Abraham Lincoln took effect, freeing African-Americans from slavery.

I question the veracity of this claim

From the EP " left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. "

This little footnote has always given credence to the argument if the north was fighting to free the slaves why didn't the north free the slaves in the north ?
Technically, Lincoln had no authority to free any slaves, let alone those in the loyal northern states. Lincoln devised the EP as a war measure which only emancipated those slaves living under states or parts of states in rebellion against the United States. By that stage of the war, many southern slaves were impressed or used to build fortifications and other military works, and to provide auxiliary services to the southern armies. Therefore, Lincoln could plausibly claim that the grant of emancipation was a blow against southern use of the enslaved population to aid the confederacy. But Lincoln knew that ultimately, emancipation could only be accomplished by Constitutional amendment, which is what he advocated and which led to the eventual passage of the 13th amendment in 1865.
 

Borderruffian

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#8
Well hit was inked in Sept 62, 1 January was the deadline for States in Rebellion to stop rebellion to stop rebelling and do as they were told or else. So I guess they can call it whatsoever makes em happy. I do however think the new moniocker will have the same cache as Juneteenth does in wide spread common useage, but whatever floats your boat.
 

Borderruffian

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#9
Technically, Lincoln had no authority to free any slaves, let alone those in the loyal northern states. Lincoln devised the EP as a war measure which only emancipated those slaves living under states or parts of states in rebellion against the United States. By that stage of the war, many southern slaves were impressed or used to build fortifications and other military works, and to provide auxiliary services to the southern armies. Therefore, Lincoln could plausibly claim that the grant of emancipation was a blow against southern use of the enslaved population to aid the confederacy. But Lincoln knew that ultimately, emancipation could only be accomplished by Constitutional amendment, which is what he advocated and which led to the eventual passage of the 13th amendment in 1865.
get outta here with facts and truth and your high flutin history stuff Saint Abe could do anything he pleased!

Ditty of the day n the South .
" Mister Lincoln what a Nit.
He freed the slaves he couldn't get"
 
#10
Technically, Lincoln had no authority to free any slaves, let alone those in the loyal northern states. Lincoln devised the EP as a war measure which only emancipated those slaves living under states or parts of states in rebellion against the United States. By that stage of the war, many southern slaves were impressed or used to build fortifications and other military works, and to provide auxiliary services to the southern armies. Therefore, Lincoln could plausibly claim that the grant of emancipation was a blow against southern use of the enslaved population to aid the confederacy. But Lincoln knew that ultimately, emancipation could only be accomplished by Constitutional amendment, which is what he advocated and which led to the eventual passage of the 13th amendment in 1865.
I disagree. Lincoln's justification for the Emancipation Proclamation was that the freeing of slaves only in areas not under Federal control was a military necessity and a limited application, therefore it was within the scope of the President's war powers of which there was precedent for his action. Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation actually had it's roots dating back to the American Revolution when in November 1775, John Murray Earl of Dunmore, the British governor of Virginia, proclaimed martial law and issued an emancipation proclamation for all slaves belonging to the American patriots:
"I do hereby further declare all indentured Servants, Negroes, or others, free that are able and willing to bear Arms, they joining His MAJESTY'S Troops as foon as may be, for the more fpeedily reducing this Colony to a proper Senfe of their Duty, to His MAJESTY'S Leige Subjects, to retain their [?], or any other Taxes due or that may become due, in their own Cuftody, till fuch Time as Peace may be again reftored to this at prefent moft unhappy Country, or demanded of them for their former falutary Purpofes, by Officers properly authorifed to receive the fame."

John Quincy Adams also advanced the idea that presidential war powers could free slaves. Following the enactment of the "Gag Rules" by Congress in 1836, Adams gave a heated speech where he warned his fellow members that "the instant that your slave-holding states become the theatre of war, civil, servile, or foreign from that instant the war powers of the constitution extend to interference with the institution of slavery in every way in which it can be interfered with." He reiterated his position again in a Congressional speech given in April 1842:
"Whether the war be civil, servile, or foreign, I lay this down as the law of nations: I say that the military authority takes for the time the place of all municipal institutions, slavery among the restreet Under that state of things, so far from its being true that the states where slavery exists have the exclusive management of the subject, not only the president of the United States, but the commander of the army has power to order the universal emancipation of the slaves."

While the Proclamation was not about to be obeyed by Confederate authorities, it did in fact free the slaves in those areas of rebellion once Union forces took control, and those areas were increasing almost daily as Union forces moved throughout the South. Any slave that could make it to Union lines were automatically free in these areas and their freedom was not subject to judicial review unlike the earlier Confiscation Acts that freed only the slaves of owners abetting the Confederacy. Prior to the Emancipation Proclamation, the Confiscation Act required that any property seizures or slaves that encountered Union forces in the rebellious areas would be returned to their owners if disloyalty to the Union could not be proved in court. The main thing Lincoln worried about was that once the war ended, the courts would order the return of slaves to their owners. That's one of the reasons he worked tirelessly to get the 13th Amendment passed.
 

jackt62

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#11
To be clear, I do agree that Lincoln was within his rights to promulgate the EP as a war measure. It certainly had historical antecedents up to and including the Confiscation Acts. But it is acknowledged that emancipation could ultimately only be legalized by a Constitutional Amendment.
 

jackt62

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#12
get outta here with facts and truth and your high flutin history stuff Saint Abe could do anything he pleased!

Ditty of the day n the South .
" Mister Lincoln what a Nit.
He freed the slaves he couldn't get"
Did Lincoln "get away" with a lot of stuff that we would consider outrageous like suspending Habeas Corpus? For sure, but as far as the EP is concerned, he was careful to frame it as a direct military measure that built on the Confiscation Acts already passed by Congress. But Lincoln still knew that it might not pass judicial muster, which is a gamble he took and won.
 
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#15
Celebrating Emancipation Day in Florida in the 1920s.


emancipation-day-parade-lincolnville-florida-1920s-1.jpg

Emancipation Day Parade: Lincolnville, Florida (1920s). Lincolnville was community in St. Augustine, FL that was founded by former slaves after the Civil War.
Image Source: FloridaMemory.com Blog, “Emancipation Day Celebrations in Florida”

st-paul-a-m-e-church-float-lincolnville-florida-1920s.jpg

St. Paul A.M.E Church float, Emancipation Day, Lincolnville, Florida (1920s)
Image Source: FloridaMemory.com Blog, “Emancipation Day Celebrations in Florida”

the-queen-and-her-court-lincolnville-florida-1920s.jpg

The Queen and her court, Emancipation Day, Lincolnville, Florida (1920s)
Image Source: FloridaMemory.com Blog, “Emancipation Day Celebrations in Florida”

- Alan
 
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#16
As noted in the above images, there was a robust celebration of Emancipation for decades after the Civil War. There are still many places where the day is celebrated. But it's not like it was back when people who were actually enslaved could celebrate the change in their own lives that resulted from the end of bondage.

- Alan
 

Pat Young

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#18
I think January 1 will always be called New Year's Day, regardless of what anyone else wants to call it. It's a little late to be renaming it.
In my neighborhood, many of my neighbors celebrate it as Haitian Independence Day. So I guess it is not impossible to call it something other than New Year's Day or to recognize that a day may have more than one name (sometimes for the same people). Sort of like March 17 in Boston.

http://tech.mit.edu/V118/N14/ring.14c.html
 
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#19
I think January 1 will always be called New Year's Day, regardless of what anyone else wants to call it. It's a little late to be renaming it.
It's not being renamed. As noted in the first post, "Jan. 1 is more than New Year’s Day. It’s also Emancipation Day, civil rights groups across the nation have declared."

- Alan
 



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