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Sweet Baked Goods Clippings Chocolate Cake

From Breakfast, Luncheon & Tea - by Marion Harland - 1875

Here's a classic chocolate cake recipe coupled with a frosting recipe from the 19th century. Very simple, but sounds yummy.

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Anna Elizabeth Henry

1st Lieutenant
Silver Patron
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Location
New York, New York
Thank you for sharing this, @Anna Elizabeth Henry! Can't go wrong with a classic.

I will say that "butter, rubbed in with sugar" sounds both enticing and completely wrong. In the immortal words of Doc Holliday in Tombstone, "How lewd." :smile:

:rofl: The method does seem interesting.

I find it odd they want you to whip the egg yolks and egg whites separate, but then combine everything. I'm going to give the method a try and see if it improves/changes the texture of the cake at all. I doubt it would affect the flavor.
 

amweiner

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 8, 2017
Location
Monterey, CA
That sounds similar to the method for a mousse, doesn't it? My parents used a sponge cake recipe that called for beating the whites separately and folding them into the batter, which was baked in one of those spring tube pan things. Could this be similar?
 

Anna Elizabeth Henry

1st Lieutenant
Silver Patron
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Location
New York, New York
That sounds similar to the method for a mousse, doesn't it? My parents used a sponge cake recipe that called for beating the whites separately and folding them into the batter, which was baked in one of those spring tube pan things. Could this be similar?

Very well could be. I know a jelly cake tin is the thinner/flatter tin used to make things like a Swiss roll. Perhaps the cake needs to be made differently as a result.

Oh, you're thinking of the springform pan, it's used for desserts like cheesecake and mousse, so you don't have difficultly removing it from the pan. Plus, it also sets well and provides side structure to hold more loose ingredients together before you serve them.
 

Anna Elizabeth Henry

1st Lieutenant
Silver Patron
Joined
Feb 15, 2015
Location
New York, New York
All of the recipes have actually been for a yellow cake with chocolate filling and icing.the recipe below is actually for a chocolate cake from "Miss Parloa's New Cookbook".Maria Parloa was the principal of the School of Cooking in Boston,this is a 19th century recipe.

www.vintagerecipes.net/books/missparloa/chocolate_cake_1.php

I wonder if people back in the day thought chocolate cake with chocolate frosting too decadent as you don't see it often in 19th century cookbooks. Or would it be expensive to use chocolate/coco powder?
 

donna

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
May 12, 2010
Location
Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
Chocolate cake is always my favorite. My husband had one made for me for today, my birthday. It is from the Publix Bakery. It looks beautiful and know will be delicious. Would love to share with my family but because of virus can only see them on skype.
 
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