Chickamauga Battlefield

RLowe

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Dec 19, 2019
The Battle of Chickamaga (Sept 1863)
- Wilder Tower
- The Brotherton Farm (where Longstreet’s breakthrough took place)
- Longstreet’s headquarters, looking north toward North Dyer Field (direction of the attack after the breakthrough)
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lelliott19

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Georgian183

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Apr 17, 2021
My wife liked visiting old forts but she thought Chickamauga a profoundly ominous and depressing place.

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My wife and I visited Chickamauga for the first time this past April, and she felt the exact same way; she seems to be sensitive to the energy of different places (if there is such a thing), and always picks up a "vibe". She was in tears after visiting Andersonville due to how strong the feelings are there. I genuinely believe some people are in fact gifted with an stronger "antennae", if you will, that allows them to sense or perceive more than others.
 

lelliott19

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My wife and I visited Chickamauga for the first time this past April, and she felt the exact same way; she seems to be sensitive to the energy of different places (if there is such a thing), and always picks up a "vibe". She was in tears after visiting Andersonville due to how strong the feelings are there. I genuinely believe some people are in fact gifted with an stronger "antennae", if you will, that allows them to sense or perceive more than others.
I think you are absolutely correct about the existence of that gift @Georgian183
 

SgtDarby8OVI

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Jun 30, 2021
I am not overly sensitive to such things but there is a palpable aura of gloom that hangs over parts of that battlefield. On one of my research trips I found a service road running below the crest of Horseshoe Ridge that holds a couple of small monuments and some regimental markers. It was evening, and I could feel the energy of those Confederates trying to crack Thomas's line in the twilight on September 20. It gave me goosebumps. The thousands of men camped there in 1898 when it was an army staging area for the invasion of Cuba were well aware of the landscape's legacy. As Camp Thomas was swept by typhoid and misery during the summer of 1898, one Iowa unit started a letter to the state governor with the heading "In camp on the River of Death." Their claims that the camp was unhealthy were strongly contested by the Civil War veterans, but the landscape's persistently unnerving effect on people couldn't be ignored.
 
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