Chamberlain Chamberlain and Shipyard Pale Ale

suzenatale

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 25, 2013
Expired Image Removed
http://bowdoinorient.com/article/4377

I'm getting a lot of questions about my avatar. The Statue is of Chamberlain and it is in Brunswick Maine across the Street from the Chamberlain home and next to the Bowdoin college campus. The photo is rather irreverent because it was taken by Bowdoin students. I don't know much about the Ale but here is a website for it http://shipyard.com

Expired Image Removed

I should probably find another avatar a bit more mature, I'll accept suggestions.
 

Oxkern

Sergeant
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Location
Oxford, England
Great photo, and I hope the beer lives up to Chamberlain's reputation.
At a party last year, a friend was drinking this:
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I asked her for the bottle and took it home with me as I'd never seen any ACW-related beverages before.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Location
Hannover, Germany
Wow, and even in my hometown of Hannover! I did instantly recognize him, it's Karl Karmarsch. And he also has something to do with a University, like that other guy with the beer bottle in the beginning of this thread :D
He founded our University which is now Leibniz-University.
Thank you, 7th Mississippi, I'm glad you posted that!
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Wow, and even in my hometown of Hannover! I did instantly recognize him, it's Karl Karmarsch. And he also has something to do with a University, like that other guy with the beer bottle in the beginning of this thread :D
He founded our University which is now Leibniz-University.
Thank you, 7th Mississippi, I'm glad you posted that!
Universities and beer, a long tumultuous relationship. . .
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
Being from Baltimore I must add the the grave site of the Great American Bard, Edgar Allen Poe. Sorry it's not a statue. But since the 1930's or 40's a mysterious admirer had left roses & a bottle of cognac at Poe's grave site on the anniversary of the poets death. The caped man would appear annually, but in true Poe style he remained anonymous despite fanfare. Some people would sit in visual all night waiting for the appearance of the "Poe Toaster". Sadly the visits have recently ended after 60+ years and many assume the "Poe Toaster " or "Toasters" have since passed away. Either way its an admirable mystery apt for the great poet himself :thumbsup:

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http://mobile.omg-facts.com/Interesting/Every-Year-A-Masked-Man-Leaves-Roses-And/53651

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...tor-to-Edgar-Allen-Poes-grave-disappears.html
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Location
Hannover, Germany
"Said the raven: never more"

I've seen Poe's grave this summer when we came to Baltimore on our vacation trip (very nice city, btw, we loved your Harbour with these cafes and restaurants and of course we visited Fort McHenry!). Unfortunately I did not know then that Lewis Armistead is also buried in that same cemetary.
 

FrenchZouave

Corporal
Joined
May 25, 2008
Location
Mosby's Confederacy, Virginia
Lewis's uncle was Major George Armistead. The commander of Ft. McHenry when the British attempted to take the fort. I'm assuming the family had Lewis interred there. My lady and I love Baltimore for its wonderful restaurants. Especially the "Little Italy" neighborhood. The scent of roasted Garlic in the air makes a hard choice where to dine!
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
"Said the raven: never more"

I've seen Poe's grave this summer when we came to Baltimore on our vacation trip (very nice city, btw, we loved your Harbour with these cafes and restaurants and of course we visited Fort McHenry!). Unfortunately I did not know then that Lewis Armistead is also buried in that same cemetary.

Thank you, I love the City too glad you enjoyed it. I grew up in South Baltimore & Fort McHenry was like a playground for us. I still love it there! But now we live a little further North in Union Bridge & my neighbors are dairy farmers. I'm a country boy now & love this too :smile:

Amistead was a Virginian but had family living in Baltimore. After his death at Gettysburg they took his body & had it buried locally. It was his uncle, Major George Armistead who commanded the defenses of Fort McHenry during the British assault in the War of 1812. I believe next year is the 200th anniversary of the bombardment. Maj. Amistead commissioned (with his own funds) local Seamstress Mary Pinkersgill to produce the huge flag that inspired Francis Scott Key's "The Star Spangled Banner". The Amisteads owned the flag for decades & sent pieces of the cloth to admires who requested a souvenir! Lucky for us the banner was so large or it may not even exist today... Many people of the Victorian age just didn't always display the same concept of preservation as we do today.
 
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