Celticness of the South split from Celtic and other influences on secession

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#1
Never said I was for any of what you described.
But it was a federal law, so I was wondering why for you that is an excuse for other things but not for this.




Fugitive slave act: lets see ... kidnapping, trial without jury, enslaving people. And you are FOR this????

I have a dim, fearful view of undocumenteds roaming about. They are forced into crime by their very nature as being fugitives. I do not care for slavery in any form, but every government before electricity seems to have needed it... to control the lives of others, as well as to make profit on the slaves. No, I am not for slavery. My ancestors in the Confederate army owned no slaves, and sought to own none.

The Fugitive Slave Law was too little too late for a Slavocracy that was in its ending stages, with way too many slaves and way too many citizens exposed to danger.

There is a Confederate Celtic-identifying South that is not identified with Slavery.

It exists today, and has no desire for any slaves to be made of anyone. Our ancestors saw slavery as an evil, Jefferson included, but they saw Northern Aggression as an even worse evil; one that, if left unchecked, could invite a whole diverse plague of evils upon the people. The English and New England were foremost in making this a problem for every generation. The Anglo-Saxon idea that Jefferson warned us of... about living on top of each other... has never been heeded at the North. And are you for that???
 

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Pat Young

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#2
So getting away from politics and examining the notion of the Celticness of the South.

If the South was Celtic back in 1865, one would think we would find those strong Celtic traditions reflected in the self-identification of Southerners as Celts. Here is the 2000 Census on the percent of Americans self-identifying as Scottish. Red means higher percentage:

cw scottish ancestry.JPG

cw scottish key.JPG
 

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Looking at this estimate of ethnic origins of all Americans in 1790, it is hard to imagine Celts having the ethnic clout to create a Southern culture that was Celtic.

cw 1790.JPG
 

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#7
Let's look at country of nationality in the 1790 census, we get the following:
Scottish Nationality

1790 scottish nationality.JPG

In short, the biggest group of Scots lived in Pennsylvania. More Scots lived in Massachusetts than in Virginia.
 

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ole

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What? You didn't provide a map where the Norskes were? I'm insulted. (Color Wisconsin and Minnesota Red. Is there a color for Finns?)

This entire thread is a farce. The Celts and Gaels and Picts might have been formidable when my ancestors were Vikings (pronounced wikkings, by the way).

We have an old joke about why the Irish were not conquered: Because the Norsemen couldn't climb trees.:giggle:

But it remains that ethnicity had nothing to do with the qualities of the men involved. Most had been long since Americans. Foolishness.
 
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#18
A couple of branches in my family were Scots-Irish. One arrived in Philadelphia around 1750 as it was the primary port of entry for the great migration of Ulster Scots. After a couple of generations my ancestor relocated to Mississippi around 1830. Fairly common. BTW he sent four sons to the war, all serving the Confederacy.
 
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