Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of Grant's Inauguration - In Spite OF Myself


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O' Be Joyful

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#5
Very interesting, Mr. Cottage. I enjoyed the link, but why, "In Spite of Myself"?
I believe it is because Grant didn't want to be president and abhorred politics, but saw it as the only way to preserve the sacrifices, blood and treasure, made during the the war. He feared all or much would be undone unless an honest man, not one of scheming politicians that were lining up, took office at that time.
 
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Cavalry Charger

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#7
From the link:

"While pondering his life in his final weeks Grant would write to his doctor "It seems that one man's destiny in this world is quite as much a mystery as it is likely to be in the next… I certainly never had either ambition or taste for political life, yet I was twice president of the United States." He would echo this modest outlook in the beginning lines of his memoirs stating, “Man proposes and God disposes, there are but few important events in the affairs of men brought about by their own choice.” In his perspective of destiny, he left out a crucial element of motivation, duty. Duty is what drove him to dash down the bullet-ridden streets of Monterrey Mexico, to nurse the dying on the Isthmus of Panama, to endure lonely western outposts, to push through illness to maintain a St. Louis farm, to fight a horrific war to preserve his country, to take on the reputation destroying battleground of politics and finally to will himself to live long enough to pen his memoirs for the sake of his beloved family. More than anything it was that same overriding sense of duty that placed a humble American on the portico of the Capitol on that rainy March afternoon, pledging to faithfully serve the will of those who had put him there to the best of his ability. In the 150 years since that day Ulysses Grant’s presidency has been the subject of intense criticism. However, if one is willing to look a bit deeper, they will discover the underrepresented achievements of the man who became president in spite of himself. "
 
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#8
Very interesting, Mr. Cottage. I enjoyed the link, but why, "In Spite of Myself"?
As previously stated Grant was personally not interested in leaving his stable post-war military career and financial security for the world of Washington politics. He wrote Sherman after he received the nomination I have been forced into it in spite of myself. I could not back down… leaving the contest for power over the next four years between mere trading politicians, the elevation of whom, no matter which party won, would lose to us largely, the results of the costly war we have gone through.” He was driven by a sense of duty and the belief that the progress of the nation bought by the blood of comrades could be lost.
 
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#10

Northern Light

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#12
I believe it is because Grant didn't want to be president and abhorred politics, but saw it as the only way to preserve the sacrifices, blood and treasure, made during the the war. He feared all or much would be undone unless an honest man, not one of scheming politicians that were lining up, took office at that time.
Oh, I thought it was the poster, not Grant! Silly me.
 

Northern Light

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#13
As previously stated Grant was personally not interested in leaving his stable post-war military career and financial security for the world of Washington politics. He wrote Sherman after he received the nomination I have been forced into it in spite of myself. I could not back down… leaving the contest for power over the next four years between mere trading politicians, the elevation of whom, no matter which party won, would lose to us largely, the results of the costly war we have gone through.” He was driven by a sense of duty and the belief that the progress of the nation bought by the blood of comrades could be lost.
And probably a good prod by Julia. "Come on, Ullys. I KNOW you will be great at this!"
 
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#16
When I look at pictures from this era I always wonder how many people could hear the speaker. And wasn't General, then President Grant known to have a "soft" voice? Great pictures.
From reports only those closest to Grant could actually hear him. Most were there just as a sign of support, to be there to witness the occasion and were content to read the content of the address in the papers the next day.
 

O' Be Joyful

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#17
From reports only those closest to Grant could actually hear him. Most were there just as a sign of support, to be there to witness the occasion and were content to read the content of the address in the papers the next day.
Or pre-printed and distributed thru the crowd before-hand?
 



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