Restricted Debate Celebrate Southern Unionist History Month this May: Who Are Your Favorites?

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
30,078
Location
Long Island, NY
#1
southern unionist.JPG

This May we are celebrating Southern Unionist History Month. May 1865 signaled the triumph of millions of Southerners who were liberated from slavery. It is time to recognize the many people from the Slave States who helped to end slavery in the United States. Who are your favorite Southern Unionists?
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,301
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#7

This May we are celebrating Southern Unionist History Month. May 1865 signaled the triumph of millions of Southerners who were liberated from slavery. It is time to recognize the many people from the Slave States who helped to end slavery in the United States. Who are your favorite Southern Unionists?
Other than several direct ancestors and collateral relatives from east Tennessee, and n.w. Arkansas, the 1st prominent southern Unionist that comes to mind, ( I believe that is your intent), is a fellow east Tennessean, SAMUEL POWHATAN CARTER the only U.S. Army Major-General to also serve as a Rear- Admiral in the Navy. I could probably come up with several more in a month.

P269.gif


Brigadier-general, was born in
Elizabethton, Carter county, Tenn., Aug. 6, 1819. He studied
at Princeton college, but never graduated, leaving college in
1840 to accept an appointment as midshipman in the U. S. navy.
He was promoted to passed midshipman in 1846, assigned to duty
on the "Ohio" and served on the eastern coast of Mexico during
the Mexican war, being present at the capture of Vera Cruz.
He was attached to the U. S. naval observatory in Washington
in 1847 and 1848, was assistant instructor at the U. S. naval
academy in 1851-53, was promoted master in 1854 and lieutenant
in 1855, and from 1855 to 1857 was attached to the "San
Jacinto" of the Asiatic squadron, participating in the capture
of the Barrier forts in the Canton river. Returning to
America, he was for two years assistant instructor at West
Point, and on July 11, 1861, was ordered to the special duty
of organizing troops from east Tennessee. He was commissioned
brigadier-general, May 1, 1862, was provost-marshal of east
Tennessee during 1863 and 1864, was brevetted major-general of
volunteers, March 13, 1865, and mustered out in Jan., 1866.
He distinguished himself during the war for gallantry at Wild
Cat, Ky. Mill Springs, and in the capture of Cumberland gap.
In Dec., 1862, he commanded a cavalry expedition which cut the
east Tennessee railroad, destroying nearly 100 miles of track,
and doing other damage. He commanded the left wing of the
army at Kinston, N. C., March 1O, 1865, and defeated the
Confederates at Goldsboro. At the close of the war he
returned to naval duty, was promoted captain and commodore,
was retired Aug. 6, 1881, and promoted rear admiral on the
retired list, May 16, 1882. He was commandant at the U. S.
naval academy during 1869-72, and was a member of the light-
house board from 1867 to 1880. He died in Washington D. C.,
May 26, 1891.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 8
 
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
16,339
Location
los angeles ca
#9

This May we are celebrating Southern Unionist History Month. May 1865 signaled the triumph of millions of Southerners who were liberated from slavery. It is time to recognize the many people from the Slave States who helped to end slavery in the United States. Who are your favorite Southern Unionists?
1.George Kirk - Commander of the 3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry Union. Kirk was an aggressive commander who took the war deep behind enemy lines.
2. Newt Knight - who daringly led Union Unionist guerrillas deep behind Confederate lines without any assistance from the Union. Knight and his band were never completely destroyed by the Confederate Army despite the Confederate Army sending many troops who themselves were diverted from the front lines.
3. George Thomas
All the brave men of the South black and white who put their lives on the line as either soldiers,sailors or guerrillas.
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,301
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#10
without any assistance from the Union
Because he never attempted to join them ! Union troops all over Mississippi at that time. Southern Unionist ? more like southern demagogue! Everyone else listed so far actually cast their lot with the Union. Knight's main concern was himself.
 
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
16,339
Location
los angeles ca
#11
Because he never attempted to join them ! Union troops all over Mississippi at that time. Southern Unionist ? more like southern demagogue! Everyone else listed so far actually cast their lot with the Union. Knight's main concern was himself.
Newt Knight and his men did a lot of good by tying down Confederate troops deep behind Confederate lines. Not sure if Union soldiers ever penetrated as far South has Jones County. We could certainly say that all of the Missouri Bushwhackers could of joined the Confederate Army has they could easily get to Arkansas to join the Confederate Army yet they are regarded as heros of the Confederacy by some of our posters.
Why not think the same for Knight?
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
8,733
Location
District of Columbia
#14
My top 3 are Robert Smalls, Prince Rivers, and Andre Calloux.

From Wiki: Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 – February 23, 1915) was an American businessman, publisher, and politician. Born into slavery in Beaufort, South Carolina, he freed himself, his crew, and their families during the American Civil War by commandeering a Confederate transport ship, CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, on May 13, 1862, and sailing it from Confederate-controlled waters of the harbor to the U.S. blockade that surrounded it. He then piloted the ship to the Union-controlled enclave in Beaufort-Port Royal-Hilton Head area, where she became a Union warship. His example and persuasion helped convince President Abraham Lincoln to accept African-American soldiers into the Union Army.

From Wiki: Prince Rivers (1824–1887) was a former slave from South Carolina who served as a soldier in the Union Army and as a state politician during the Reconstruction era. He escaped and joined Union lines, becoming a sergeant in the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, a Union regiment in the American Civil War. He had gained literacy as a slave and after the war joined the Republican Party. He served as a delegate to the 1868 state constitutional convention, becoming known as an orator. He was one of three African-American founders of Aiken County in 1871, helped pick the site for the courthouse, and served as the state legislator from the county through 1874. He also served as a trial judge. (My mother was born in Aiken Co.)

From Wiki: Andre Cailloux (1825 – May 27, 1863) was one of the first black officers in the Union Army to be killed in combat during the American Civil War. He died heroically during the unsuccessful first attack on the Confederate fortifications during the Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana. Accounts of his heroism were widely reported in the press, and became a rallying cry for the recruitment of African Americans into the Union Army. His reputation as a patriot and martyr long outlived him. In an 1890 collection of interviews, Civil War veteran Colonel Douglass Wilson said, "If ever patriotic heroism deserved to be honored in stately marble or in brass that of Captain Caillioux deserves to be, and the American people will have never redeemed their gratitude to genuine patriotism until that debt is paid."

- Alan

> See also post #51 for the addition of Abraham Galloway.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,301
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
#16
Moses McConnell from Blount County, (east) Tennessee, made the following statement as part of his application to the Southern Claims Commission. He was a farmer, born in 1813. His son had gone through Confederate lines to Kentucky to join the Union Army.


"I was abused a good deal but I do not remember of being threatened with personal violence. A part of Rebel soldiers in the fall of 1862 threatened to take a mare from me on account of my son having gone to the Federal Army in Kentucky. On this occasion, they denounced me for being a Union man. This occurred on my farm near Maryville, Tenn.I was injured by the Rebels taking my property without compensation. I suppose my property was taken on account of my Union sentiments as they generally paid Rebels for what property they took from them. Also when they took my property they generally denounced me as a Union man. When my son left home in Oct. 1862 for the federal Army in Kentucky, I gave him money, clothing and a gun. I also furnished other Union men at the same time with the provision to enable them to go to the federal Army in Kentucky. I influenced my son and a good many other young men to go into the Union Army at different times during the war. After the federal Army occupied East Tenn., I often gave information to Officers and soldiers of said Army about the roads & Early in the war, I belonged to a Union home guard which was organized for purposes of mutual protection among Union men. After the occupation of East Tenn. by the federal Army I joined an organization called National Guard which was organized under the authority of Maj. Genl. Burnside for the purpose of assisting the Union Army as scouts, pilots, &, etc. I was so engaged about two years. I also contributed wood and provisions to the families of Union men who were in the Federal Army. I had nephews named Thomas and Moses McConnell in the Confederate Army – no other near relatives. They lived in the State of Georgia. I do not know where they are now living or not as I have not heard from them since the war. I contributed nothing to them. At the beginning of the rebellion, my sympathies were with the Union cause. I felt I deserved the success of the Union cause, and that I would do all I could to further it. I so expressed myself and always contended that the Union Cause was right and that the rebellion should be crushed. I advocated the cause of the federal Govt. and done all I could to induce persons to vote against secession. I voted against “Convention” in February and against “Separation” in June 1861. I adhered to the Union after the secession of my State".
 
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
16,339
Location
los angeles ca
#17
If we read Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, it is hard to find a connection to the Northern War Effort, Unionist, and Ending Slavery. Are we assuming that any Unionist was an Abolitionist?
No not at all. A Unionist could be a slave owner as was one Colonel in a Tennessee Unionist Regiment. A Unionist just means a Southerner fighting and or supporting the Union against the Confederacy. Post EP every Unionist soldier is an abolitionist.
Leftyhunter
 

Viper21

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
2,235
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
#20

This May we are celebrating Southern Unionist History Month. May 1865 signaled the triumph of millions of Southerners who were liberated from slavery. It is time to recognize the many people from the Slave States who helped to end slavery in the United States. Who are your favorite Southern Unionists?
So.... is this a real thing, you know.... officially recognized by a state or government authority, or is this just some made up facebook page..?
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top