CDV of a Civil War Soldier and His Dog on eBay

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
Both the soldier and his terrier wear a somber expression in this CDV; nevertheless, it's a handsome portrait. Is that a bugle on the soldier's cap? A musician?

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LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
Could it possibly be one of the metal simulated embroidery horns used by some infantry officers, with regimental numbers within the loop? Here are a couple examples from "American Military Headgear Insignia" by J. Duncan Campbell and Michael J. O'Donnell.

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The horn on his cap does look three-dimensional. A bit of shadow is at the bottom right side, and the horn appears to be reflecting light onto the cap's visor.

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Joined
Jul 22, 2021
It takes more muscles in ones face to smile and hold it in that position for the length of time a camera shutter was open. That is why there are few smiles in these period photographs. Nonetheless, it is a beautiful photo with both dog and soldier being crystal clear. That was one feat keeping that dog still!
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
It takes more muscles in ones face to smile and hold it in that position for the length of time a camera shutter was open. That is why there are few smiles in these period photographs. Nonetheless, it is a beautiful photo with both dog and soldier being crystal clear. That was one feat keeping that dog still!
Keeping a dog awake through a photo sitting must have been a challenge too. Several of my favorite Civil War dog pictures are of dogs who fell asleep.
 

mofederal

Major
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
Pretty fancy officer's greatcoat/overcoat. Not issue, it has to be private purchase. Cut of the collar is different too. No expert on greatcoats, it just looks a lot different than most others I have seen. That said there were many clothiers out there, many tailors too.
 

Mark F. Jenkins

Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Location
Central Ohio
It takes more muscles in ones face to smile and hold it in that position for the length of time a camera shutter was open. That is why there are few smiles in these period photographs. Nonetheless, it is a beautiful photo with both dog and soldier being crystal clear. That was one feat keeping that dog still!

There's that, but in traditional painted portraits smiles (other than the faint 'Mona Lisa' kind) were rather rare as well. Photographic portraiture followed the traditional model until private cameras became common.
 
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