Cavalry column on the Rappahannock River.

Robert Gray

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
FEDERAL CAVALRY LEAVING CAMP
THE ARM THAT DEALT A FINAL BLOW TO THE CONFEDERACY

The well-filled bags before and behind each trooper indicate a long and hard trip in store. Both the Confederate and Federal cavalry distinguished themselves by their endurance on their arduous and brilliant raids. The amount of destruction accomplished by this arm of the service was well-nigh incalculable. Stuart, Mosby, Forrest on one side - Sheridan, Grierson, Kilpatrick on the other - each in turn upset the opponents' calculations and forced them to change their plans. It was Van Dorn's capture at Holly Springs that caused Grant's first failure against Vicksburg. It was not until after the surrender at Appomattox that Lee learned the final crushing blow - that the rations destined for his men had been captured by Sheridan. Up and down the Rappahannock the cavalry rode and scouted and fought by day and by night, sometimes saddled for sixty hours, often sleeping by regiments on the slowly moving columns of horses. It was Grierson who reported, after his ride from Vicksburg to Baton Rouge, that the Confederacy was but a hollow shell - all of its men were on the battle-line. It was Stuart who twice circled McClellan's army, on the Peninsula and in Maryland, and who caused Lincoln to recall the schoolboy game : "Three times round and out."

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN TEN VOLUMES
Frances T. Miller - Editor in Chief - The Review of Reviews Co.
1911

Image: National Archives (NARA-524925)

524925a.jpg
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
FEDERAL CAVALRY LEAVING CAMP
THE ARM THAT DEALT A FINAL BLOW TO THE CONFEDERACY

The well-filled bags before and behind each trooper indicate a long and hard trip in store. Both the Confederate and Federal cavalry distinguished themselves by their endurance on their arduous and brilliant raids. The amount of destruction accomplished by this arm of the service was well-nigh incalculable. Stuart, Mosby, Forrest on one side - Sheridan, Grierson, Kilpatrick on the other - each in turn upset the opponents' calculations and forced them to change their plans. It was Van Dorn's capture at Holly Springs that caused Grant's first failure against Vicksburg. It was not until after the surrender at Appomattox that Lee learned the final crushing blow - that the rations destined for his men had been captured by Sheridan. Up and down the Rappahannock the cavalry rode and scouted and fought by day and by night, sometimes saddled for sixty hours, often sleeping by regiments on the slowly moving columns of horses. It was Grierson who reported, after his ride from Vicksburg to Baton Rouge, that the Confederacy was but a hollow shell - all of its men were on the battle-line. It was Stuart who twice circled McClellan's army, on the Peninsula and in Maryland, and who caused Lincoln to recall the schoolboy game : "Three times round and out."

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN TEN VOLUMES
Frances T. Miller - Editor in Chief - The Review of Reviews Co.
1911

Image: National Archives (NARA-524925)

View attachment 396746
Well written. Thank you for sharing this.
As a life long resident of the Fredericksburg area, where I grew up swimming, boating and fishing the Rappahannock River, my guess is this photo was taken near Port Royal. I am basing that analysis on the width of the river and the terrain. Port Royal was a sizeabe Union supply base at one time during the war. It’s located about 20 miles down river from Fredericksburg.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
Well written. Thank you for sharing this.
As a life long resident of the Fredericksburg area, where I grew up swimming, boating and fishing the Rappahannock River, my guess is this photo was taken near Port Royal. I am basing that analysis on the width of the river and the terrain. Port Royal was a sizeabe Union supply base at one time during the war. It’s located about 20 miles down river from Fredericksburg.
For accuracy, I should add one side of the river (high ground in photo) is Port Royal. The side of the river where the horsemen are is Port Conway.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Location
Canad-istan
Well written. Thank you for sharing this.
As a life long resident of the Fredericksburg area, where I grew up swimming, boating and fishing the Rappahannock River, my guess is this photo was taken near Port Royal. I am basing that analysis on the width of the river and the terrain. Port Royal was a sizeabe Union supply base at one time during the war. It’s located about 20 miles down river from Fredericksburg.
What treasures might you dig up there, Woods-walker? Ever tried relic hunting in that area?
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
What treasures might you dig up there, Woods-walker? Ever tried relic hunting in that area?
A large portion is an Army base (Camp A.P. Hill). Relic hunting is punishable by a huge fine & jail time. They used to allow it years ago but I never hunted that particular area when it was legal. Stonewall Jackson’s 62-63 winter camp is just up the road and I practically lived it it until the government stopped relic hunting in the 1970s. A large part of it is on base too.
99% of the non federal property in the area is posted and you have to be friends with some landowner - most won’t let just anyone in. My nephew got caught on posted property there last winter- he got off easy , fortunately for him.
The Stonewall winter camp yielded some fantastic finds. My best was a perfect two piece Georgia buckle with about 4 inches of leather still attached. I handed it over to a relic hunter friend a few minutes after unearthing. Long story as to why I gave it away.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Location
Canad-istan
A large portion is an Army base (Camp A.P. Hill). Relic hunting is punishable by a huge fine & jail time. They used to allow it years ago but I never hunted that particular area when it was legal. Stonewall Jackson’s 62-63 winter camp is just up the road and I practically lived it it until the government stopped relic hunting in the 1970s. A large part of it is on base too.
99% of the non federal property in the area is posted and you have to be friends with some landowner - most won’t let just anyone in. My nephew got caught on posted property there last winter- he got off easy , fortunately for him.
The Stonewall winter camp yielded some fantastic finds. My best was a perfect two piece Georgia buckle with about 4 inches of leather still attached. I handed it over to a relic hunter friend a few minutes after unearthing. Long story as to why I gave it away.

Drool....
 
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