Casualties of the Battle of Atlanta

AUG

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE BEFORE ATLANTA GEORGIA, JULY 24, 1864

Major-General W. T. Sherman, commanding Military Division of Mississippi

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following general summary of the result of the attack of the enemy on this army on the 22d inst.

Total loss, killed, wounded, and missing, thirty-five hundred and twenty-one, and ten pieces of artillery. We have buried and delivered to the enemy, under a flag of truce sent in by them, in front of the Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, one thousand of their killed. The number of their dead in front of the Fourth Division of the same corps, including those on the ground not now occupied by our troops, General Blair reports, will swell the number of their dead on his front to two thousand. The number of their dead buried in front of the Fifteenth Corps, up to this hour, is three hundred and sixty, and the commanding officer reports that at least as many more are yet unburied; burying-parties being still at work. The number of dead buried in front of the Sixteenth Corps is four hundred and twenty-two. We have over one thousand of their wounded in our hands, the larger number of the wounded being carried off during the night, after the engagement, by them. We captured eighteen stands of colors, and have them now. We also captured five thousand stands of arms. The attack was made on our lines seven times, and was seven times repulsed. Hood's and Hardee's corps and Wheeler's cavalry engaged us. We have sent to the rear one thousand prisoners, including thirty-three commissioned officers of high rank. We still occupy the field, and the troops are in fine spirits. A detailed and full report will be furnished as soon as completed.

Recapitulation.

Our total loss: 3,521

Enemy's dead, thus far reported, buried and delivered to them: 3,220

Total prisoners sent North: 1,017

Total prisoners, wounded, in our hands: 1,000

Estimated loss of the enemy, at least: 10,000

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
John A Logan, Major-General

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/union-generals/sherman/memoirs/general-sherman-battle-atlanta.htm

In "The Day Dixie Died" Gary Ecelbarger puts the overall Federal loss at 3,722 and the Confederate loss at an estimated 5,700 - 6,300. The Federal count is probably more accurate than any Confederate estimate given. The next day the dead and wounded were collected under flags of truce, but no official Confederate casualty count was recorded. Not every commander recorded his casualties, and those that did may have underestimated.

So the total loss, both sides, could be over 10,000.

In comparison, at the Battle of Franklin there were 6,252 Confederate and 2,326 Federal casualties recorded. Recent studies (Eric A. Jacobson and others) have supposed that the losses at Franklin were higher, possibly over 10,000.

The Battle of Perryville saw a reported 4,241 Union and 3,396 Confederate losses.

While the losses are not comparable to Shiloh, Stones River or Chickamauga, the Battle of Atlanta would still rival many others as one of the bloodiest battles in the Western Theater; however, it is largely forgotten today.
 
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rickvox79

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE BEFORE ATLANTA GEORGIA, JULY 24, 1864

Major-General W. T. Sherman, commanding Military Division of Mississippi

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following general summary of the result of the attack of the enemy on this army on the 22d inst.

Total loss, killed, wounded, and missing, thirty-five hundred and twenty-one, and ten pieces of artillery. We have buried and delivered to the enemy, under a flag of truce sent in by them, in front of the Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, one thousand of their killed. The number of their dead in front of the Fourth Division of the same corps, including those on the ground not now occupied by our troops, General Blair reports, will swell the number of their dead on his front to two thousand. The number of their dead buried in front of the Fifteenth Corps, up to this hour, is three hundred and sixty, and the commanding officer reports that at least as many more are yet unburied; burying-parties being still at work. The number of dead buried in front of the Sixteenth Corps is four hundred and twenty-two. We have over one thousand of their wounded in our hands, the larger number of the wounded being carried off during the night, after the engagement, by them. We captured eighteen stands of colors, and have them now. We also captured five thousand stands of arms. The attack was made on our lines seven times, and was seven times repulsed. Hood's and Hardee's corps and Wheeler's cavalry engaged us. We have sent to the rear one thousand prisoners, including thirty-three commissioned officers of high rank. We still occupy the field, and the troops are in fine spirits. A detailed and full report will be furnished as soon as completed.

Recapitulation.

Our total loss: 3,521

Enemy's dead, thus far reported, buried and delivered to them: 3,220

Total prisoners sent North: 1,017

Total prisoners, wounded, in our hands: 1,000

Estimated loss of the enemy, at least: 10,000

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
John A Logan, Major-General

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/union-generals/sherman/memoirs/general-sherman-battle-atlanta.htm

In "The Day Dixie Died" Gary Ecelbarger puts the overall Federal loss at 3,722 and the Confederate loss at an estimate of 5,700 - 6,300. The Federal count is probably more accurate than any Confederate amount given. The next day the dead and wounded were collected under flags of truce, but no official Confederate casualty count was recorded. Not every commander recorded his casualties and those that did may have underestimated, and might have also left out missing and captured.

So the total loss is anywhere from probably 10,000 - 14,000 at most. There were 27,000 - 30,000 Confederates engaged (not counting Wheeler's Cavalry) at the Battle of Atlanta. In comparison, at the Battle of Franklin there were 6,252 (some sources say over 7,000) Confederate casualties out of almost 25,000 engaged and 2,326 Federal casualties out of a strength of around 23,000.


Hoping to start up "The Day Dixie Died" when I finish Earl Hess' book "Kennesaw Mountain." Working on making a trip to Kennesaw, Resaca and Pickett's Mill in March if things work out so reading up to get myself familiar with those battles. Thanks for the interesting info on Atlanta!
 

AUG

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Hoping to start up "The Day Dixie Died" when I finish Earl Hess' book "Kennesaw Mountain." Working on making a trip to Kennesaw, Resaca and Pickett's Mill in March if things work out so reading up to get myself familiar with those battles. Thanks for the interesting info on Atlanta!
"The Day Dixie Died" is a great read, highly recommended. I haven't read Hess' book on Kennesaw yet but it sits on my wish list.

I've been down to Kennesaw and Pickett's Mill/New Hope/Dallas battlefields before but never got around to checking out what's left of Peachtree Creek, Atlanta and Ezra Church, although there's not much to see there now. Resaca has underwent some major changes since the last time I was down there. Hope y'all have a nice trip, good choice for this year :thumbsup:
 

CMWinkler

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One of those Union casualties was Pvt. Alexander J. Lucas, Co. G "Dunning Guards," 31st Indiana Infantry. He was mortally wounded leading up to the siege of Atlanta, and eventually died on August 29, 1864. He is buried in the Marietta National Cemetery.

By the way, he was my great, great uncle. RIP.
 
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AUG

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This is the best map of the battle I could find online. You can get an idea of where each corps was positioned. "The Day Dixie Died" has the best maps of the battle around, going into brigade and regimental level.
map.png
 

johan_steele

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I can think of only two people that believed the Battle of Atlanta a CS victory Hood & Battalion, both of which had an ulterior motive to do so. Every time I see that map or any others I just shake my head and wonder what Hood was thinking when he claimed it a victory.

Regardless there are those who believe the Battle of Atlanta to have been the hardest fought battle of the War, I'm one of them.
 
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AUG

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I can think of only two people that believed the Battle of Atlanta a CS victory Hood & Battalion, both of which had an ulterior motive to do so. Every time I see that map or any others I just shake my head and wonder what Hood was thinking when he claimed it a victory.

Regardless there are those who believe the Battle of Atlanta to have been the hardest fought battle of the War, I'm one of them.
I believe that the whole campaign was one of the hardest fought of the entire war. There were few other campaigns during the war that saw fighting practically every day and bloody battles taking place every week. The Atlanta Campaign is another one of those subjects that deserves much more attention than it gets. It was as important, if not more so, than Gettysburg.
 
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rickvox79

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Is there anything left of the Atlanta battlefield considering how large the city is now? Of course you have Kennesaw, Pickett's Mill, and Resaca close by, but I'd assume there's not much left of the battle in and around Atlanta. I've been to Atlanta many times, about the only thing I ever saw Civil War related was the Cyclorama, but then again a lot of my trips were taken when I was younger or as a young adult in my early 20's and I really wasn't looking for anything at those times.
 

AUG

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Is there anything left of the Atlanta battlefield considering how large the city is now? Of course you have Kennesaw, Pickett's Mill, and Resaca close by, but I'd assume there's not much left of the battle in and around Atlanta. I've been to Atlanta many times, about the only thing I ever saw Civil War related was the Cyclorama, but then again a lot of my trips were taken when I was younger or as a young adult in my early 20's and I really wasn't looking for anything at those times.
Here's an online tour of the Atlanta battlefield.
http://www.inheritage.org/almanack/almanack_post-battle-of-atlanta-01.html

You can get an idea of what's left. I've driven through Atlanta before but never had the chance to stop at the Peachtree Creek or Atlanta battlefield sites. From what I've heard and read, besides the Cyclorama there are the memorials to McPherson and Walker, which aren't in too good of a condition and are surrounded by housing developments. I think those are the only two memorials of any kind on the battlefield besides the markers.
 

rickvox79

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Among those killed at the Battle of Atlanta was Isaac Harris, a musician with C co. 6th Florida Infantry Regiment. He was 2nd great grand uncle.

My great-great-great grandfather Isaiah Boles, with the 53rd Alabama Partisan Rangers fought at Pickett's Mill, Kennesaw and Atlanta. He was captured in Sept 1864.
 

RobertP

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Is there anything left of the Atlanta battlefield considering how large the city is now? Of course you have Kennesaw, Pickett's Mill, and Resaca close by, but I'd assume there's not much left of the battle in and around Atlanta. I've been to Atlanta many times, about the only thing I ever saw Civil War related was the Cyclorama, but then again a lot of my trips were taken when I was younger or as a young adult in my early 20's and I really wasn't looking for anything at those times.
Not much left. Bald hill was leveled when I-20 was built. It was located at the N.E. corner of I-20 and Moreland Ave.

Hardee's night march
bald hill2 hardees night march.jpg


Hardee's attack and Bald Hill
bald hill hardee\'s attack and bald hill.jpg


Cheatham's attack and Logan's counterattack
cheatham\'s attack.jpg
 

Chattahooch33

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Not much left. Just historical markers along roads. I would go to the cyclorama then just ride through the area. The landscape is different and it was a rural area at the time.

Terrell Bailey - GGG Uncle - 65th Georgia - wounded in "lower right arm"
Leroy Randolph - GGGG Cousin - 41st Georgia - Mortally wounded and died two weeks later.
John W. Bowles - GGGG Cousin - 8th Battalion Georgia Infantry - Wounded
 

rickvox79

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I had other uncles in the 53rd Alabama Partisan Rangers that would have been involved in the Atlanta Campaign, although I need to find out when they all mustered out to know if they would have been involved for sure. But the others were Jasper Boles, McKinney Wise, Herron Wise, Joseph Wise, John Q. Wise, Joseph Wise, Daniel Wise, George W. Wise and J.J. Sanders. The Boles family and JJ Sanders were in company D, while the Wise family was in company H.

I also had a ggg-uncle in the 6th Indiana that fought in the Atlanta campaign, Henry van Trees in company E.
 

Missouri 1st

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Hoping to start up "The Day Dixie Died" when I finish Earl Hess' book "Kennesaw Mountain." Working on making a trip to Kennesaw, Resaca and Pickett's Mill in March if things work out so reading up to get myself familiar with those battles. Thanks for the interesting info on Atlanta!

Rick, I have both in my "reading queue". If you would, post your thoughts.
 

rickvox79

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Rick, I have both in my "reading queue". If you would, post your thoughts.

I really enjoyed the book on Kennesaw Mountain. The carnage of that battle sounded especially brutal and I thought Earl Hess did a great job conveying that and the courage of fighters on both sides along with solid details on the battle strategy/movements. A side note, I grew up in NW Florida but my mother lived in Marietta, GA until she was around 10 I believe. When I was a kid, in the summer, we would go stay with family friends in Marietta that knew my mom from her time there. My dad took my brother and me up Kennesaw when we were pretty young, I only have slight memories of it really. I have not been back to their house since probably 1997 and could not remember the road they lived on or how close they lived to Kennesaw so I google mapped their house after I found the address. It turns out they lived only 7 miles from the battlefield and they lived on Burnt Hickory Road which the author mentions many many times in the book when relating troop movements.

I was kicking myself as I read the book for not being more interested in the Civil War at the time considering how close I was to that battlefield many times as a kid. The family that we would visit had lived there for a long time and my dad told me that Buck (name of the family friend) said they had an old shed for years that had bullet holes in it. He had a huge bucket of bullets and other articles he had dug up over the years, from metal detecting or plowing fields around his house. He let my dad borrow the metal detector and go out around the land he owned looking for items. My dad was able to find some bullets the few times he went searching.

Anyway, I kinda got off on a tangent that wasn't really related to my review of the book haha! But needless to say I enjoyed it because of that personal connection with the battle, I also had some relatives in the fight and so it was nice to learn more about the battle. I'm glad to see more books starting to come out on these battles in the Atlanta Campaign. As far as "The Day Dixie Died" I haven't started that because I'm reading a book on Pickett's Mill, but hope to start it soon once I finish my current book.
 

Missouri 1st

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I really enjoyed the book on Kennesaw Mountain. The carnage of that battle sounded especially brutal and I thought Earl Hess did a great job conveying that and the courage of fighters on both sides along with solid details on the battle strategy/movements. A side note, I grew up in NW Florida but my mother lived in Marietta, GA until she was around 10 I believe. When I was a kid, in the summer, we would go stay with family friends in Marietta that knew my mom from her time there. My dad took my brother and me up Kennesaw when we were pretty young, I only have slight memories of it really. I have not been back to their house since probably 1997 and could not remember the road they lived on or how close they lived to Kennesaw so I google mapped their house after I found the address. It turns out they lived only 7 miles from the battlefield and they lived on Burnt Hickory Road which the author mentions many many times in the book when relating troop movements.

I was kicking myself as I read the book for not being more interested in the Civil War at the time considering how close I was to that battlefield many times as a kid. The family that we would visit had lived there for a long time and my dad told me that Buck (name of the family friend) said they had an old shed for years that had bullet holes in it. He had a huge bucket of bullets and other articles he had dug up over the years, from metal detecting or plowing fields around his house. He let my dad borrow the metal detector and go out around the land he owned looking for items. My dad was able to find some bullets the few times he went searching.

Anyway, I kinda got off on a tangent that wasn't really related to my review of the book haha! But needless to say I enjoyed it because of that personal connection with the battle, I also had some relatives in the fight and so it was nice to learn more about the battle. I'm glad to see more books starting to come out on these battles in the Atlanta Campaign. As far as "The Day Dixie Died" I haven't started that because I'm reading a book on Pickett's Mill, but hope to start it soon once I finish my current book.


Right on! Thanks! I did enjoy Hess' book on the Knoxville campaign, so am looking forward to Kennesaw.
 

JCM6395

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My grgr uncle's regiment the 42nd Indiana said that from the time they started the Atlanta Campaign that not more than 15 mins would go by without a bullet whizzing by their heads during the entire campaign. They called them "bumble bees."
 
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