Cannon or Mortar?

Snipeen1

Cadet
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
An 8 inch mortar ball ("hollow" shell, as you have,) would weigh considerably less than 64 lbs., as that is the weight of an 8 inch solid shot.
Update, it measures 10 inches in diameter, it weighs 85 lbs and the fuse hole opening is 1.75 inches
 

Snipeen1

Cadet
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
An 8 inch mortar ball ("hollow" shell, as you have,) would weigh considerably less than 64 lbs., as that is the weight of an 8 inch solid shot.
Update, it is 10 inches in diameter, it weighs 85 pounds, the wall thickness is 1 13/16 inches thick and the fuse hole is 1.75 inches in diameter. Where would any numbers be in relation to the fuse hole at top dead center
 

ucvrelics

Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Antietam 2021
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
Were these fired from shore or from ship or both?
Its was a siege mortar.
1610415669081.png
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
The 10 inch was used as a seacoast mortar, fired primarily from fixed fortifications. At the outbreak of the war, it was not long before the 10 inch mortars were replaced by the more powerful 13 inch mortar which had a longer range.
 

Snipeen1

Cadet
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Thanks much for the info, its helped alot paint a more clear picture of its use. I'm going to try and find numbers on it as well. Also make a scrapbook with photos showing this information
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
XX in. Columbiad. Gun practice.
I wonder if this is a 15" Rodman?

View attachment 387511
Soldiers load gunpowder and cannonball into a large gun. Notice large tool to grab the cannonball. (Sorry, the link I have for this photo is dead.)
Rodman.jpg

This is an image of a 15 inch Rodman that I have. I would say it's a match to the gun in your photograph, so the answer is yes.

Rodman.jpg
 

JKT

Private
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Wow..talk about a “heavy hitter”. Incoming! And will never deteriorate.
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2017
Hello everyone, thank you for the welcome. I am looking for a forum or someone that can help me with some research. I have received this cannonball as something passed down to me when my dad passed away last month. I have started on some research and based on the 9 inch diameter I think it might be a Dahlgren, not sure. The wall thickness is about 1 13/16 thick and as you see it has two holes that oppose each other for what I believe are for a lifting hook unit similar to what is used for hay bales. I have not weighed it yet but estimate it to be at least 100 to 125 pounds. Any help is appreciated, thanks

View attachment 387425
Mortar shell. The "dimples" are the tell. The ends of a clamp that helped the loaders lift the shell fit into them, as in this picture.

 

Mike Serpa

Major
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Wouldn't the "XX in" description in the photo denote the gun as a 20''? You suppose that was just an error on the part of whoever wrote it?
It just doesn't look 20" in diameter to me. Also, I thought a Rodman was different than a Columbiad?
 

CowCavalry

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 17, 2017
It just doesn't look 20" in diameter to me. Also, I thought a Rodman was different than a Columbiad?
If not mistaken, the 20" guns never saw service during the war and the 15'' were never fired in battle as well. I believe that the Rodman was a "Colombiad" which was a term for a large caliber smoothbore seacoast gun, which is what the Rodman was.
 
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