Can anyone identify this town? I bought this photo at a thrift store for $2. The photographer is W.G. Weatherup

Scott1967

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Location
England
This looks to be a redbrick building with plain plaster walls very similar to what you see in old mills in my home town of Manchester , If i was a betting man i would say this was a mill that has been burnt down , Redbrick is common in many Northern English towns and the vast majority of old mills are nearly always built in Redbrick.

As to where it is , I would guess its in the South maybe Atlanta or Charleston.

I really hope you find out where this is i love these type of mysteries.
 

chubachus

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Location
Virginia
Any idea what is on the back of that wagon? They look a little large for produce, but if they are you might be able to narrow down the region it was taken in.
 

Quiet1

Private
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
I followed @Lubliner's idea and looked at the trees. Assuming that they are native to the area (which isn't a hard indicator, as they appear to have been deliberately planted), the natural ranges of the species could be used to guess at possible locations.
I have no idea whatsoever about French trees, but I can guess at the 'Murrican ones.
Here goes:
The one on the left look like some kind of maple -- perhaps a sugar maple, with those wide, hand-like leaves and scaly bark? If it is, then the deep South is pretty much ruled out (according to the mighty Wikipedia). But there are an awful lot of Maple species out there, and I could be wrong.

The one on the right... I don't know. I feel like I've seen this kind of tree, many many times, in the northern Midwest.
Lots of little leaflets and really fine-grained, gnarly/flaky bark. My knee-jerk reaction was either Ironwood (hop hornbeam) or some kind of Locust, but I don't know. American Ash? Black walnut? Or even an Elm (which I probably haven't seen, but which would not have been quite so rare when the photo was taken). Is it a pecan? It looked similar, based on photos of pecan trees, but there doesn't seem to be much overlap between native ranges of the sugar maple & pecan.
🤔
Help! Are there any arborists on this forum?
EDIT:
I zoomed in on the "maple", and kick me if I'm wrong, but those look like oak leaves. Or am I second-guessing myself too much? The bark is still not like any oaks I'm famliliar with, but maybe it's some weird Southern, Eastern, or other foreign species. Agh!
1607907567397.png
 
Last edited:

John Winn

Major
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
State of Jefferson
I followed @Lubliner's idea and looked at the trees. Assuming that they are native to the area (which isn't a hard indicator, as they appear to have been deliberately planted), the natural ranges of the species could be used to guess at possible locations.
I have no idea whatsoever about French trees, but I can guess at the 'Murrican ones.
Here goes:
The one on the left is some kind of maple -- perhaps a sugar maple, with those wide, hand-like leaves and scaly bark? If it is, then the deep South is pretty much ruled out (according to the mighty Wikipedia). But there are an awful lot of Maple species out there, and I could be wrong.

The one on the right... I don't know. I feel like I've seen this kind of tree, many many times, in the northern Midwest.
Lots of little leaflets and really fine-grained, gnarly/flaky bark. My knee-jerk reaction was either Ironwood (hop hornbeam) or some kind of Locust, but I don't know. American Ash? Black walnut? Or even an Elm (which I probably haven't seen, but which would not have been quite so rare when the photo was taken). Is it a pecan? It looked similar, based on photos of pecan trees, but there doesn't seem to be much overlap between native ranges of the sugar maple & pecan.
🤔
Help! Are there any arborists on this forum?
Why, I'm a shrubber.


Other possibilities for the one on the left are tulip poplar and sweet gum. The one on the right could be all sorts of things. There's just not enough detail to say.
 
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