Can anyone identify this town? I bought this photo at a thrift store for $2. The photographer is W.G. Weatherup

Di1961

Cadet
Joined
Nov 10, 2020
aftermath, civil war burned buildingd; original photo.jpg
 

dahenry

Private
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Perhaps Emmitsburg Md., a nasty fire there 15th/16th June, 1863. However, the pole on the right, with what appear to be glass insulators, doesn't quite fit the period does it? I think that telegraph networks of that era only required a single wire, so wouldn't need multiple insulators. Could easily be wrong though, as I'm not an expert on mid-19th century telegraph construction!
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
I tried to look up the photographer. The only WG Weatherup I could find was born around the time of the Civil War. Could he have been Canadian? There is some tie into NY stare I keep seeing.
There are examples of his work at Harvard, Hagley and a third museum.
The buildings may have been ruined during ACW but the costumes of the people are from a later time. The photographer very well may be "your" WG Weatherup. Perhaps @Di1961 should contact Harvard or UKy or Hagley museum.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Richmond received a lot of damage. Library of Congress photos.
View attachment 381219
View attachment 381220


As did Charleston. Library of Congress photos.
View attachment 381221

View attachment 381222
My first thought was Charleston. But, if this was a staged photo years later, as a fellow member mentioned the clothing was not what would have been worn in the 1860’s and this photographer was born in 1865, I think it was... where was damage not repaired within 25 years or so? That might also help in pinpointing the location.
 

Mike Serpa

Major
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
My first thought was Charleston. But, if this was a staged photo years later, as a fellow member mentioned the clothing was not what would have been worn in the 1860’s and this photographer was born in 1865, I think it was... where was damage not repaired within 25 years or so? That might also help in pinpointing the location.
Richmond and Charleston came to mind as I remember seeing more photos of these cities showing damage compared to the number of photos showing damage to other cities

An answer to your question might greatly help in determining the location of the photo.
 
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
If I had to place a bet, I'd say that it's probably not a Civil War photograph at all - the photographer was too young (and he was based in Western New York), and the clothing in the image isn't CW era. It kind of reminds me of images of a 1905
catastrophe in my hometown of Brockton, Mass, when a boiler exploded and took out the Grover Shoe Factory. Fifty eight people were killed, the roof crashed down through all 4 floors, and the boiler itself landed a couple of blocks away See images of that below.
Before
1605137077063.png



After
1605136894018.png
 

Georgia

Sergeant
If I had to place a bet, I'd say that it's probably not a Civil War photograph at all - the photographer was too young (and he was based in Western New York), and the clothing in the image isn't CW era. It kind of reminds me of images of a 1905
catastrophe in my hometown of Brockton, Mass, when a boiler exploded and took out the Grover Shoe Factory. Fifty eight people were killed, the roof crashed down through all 4 floors, and the boiler itself landed a couple of blocks away See images of that below.
Before
View attachment 381231


After
View attachment 381230
What a horrible event- the destruction is just incredible.
 

lupaglupa

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
Location
Upstate New York
It seems Weatherup left his photography business in Westfield, New York and moved to Jamestown sometime around 1900. The local directories give his occupation as correspondent for the American Aristotype Co., which sold photography supplies. It was bought out by Eastman Kodak, though they kept the name going. In 1913 Weatherup was promoted to be the manager of the American Aristotype plant in Jamestown.

That could help us date the photograph.
 
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