Can anyone give me more information on this "Yellow Tavern" drawing?

Joined
Sep 16, 2013
Messages
4
Hello!

Can anyone give me more information on this drawing? It says at the bottom in hard to read pencil scrawl "Yellow Tavern."

In the image you see a large brick building with what appears to be a Union flag flying.

This building is not the Yellow Tavern that gave its name to the area where the battle occurred in May 1864. That old tavern was a ruins by 1864. I have not been able to find any kind of image at all for the old Yellow Tavern.

If anyone knows of any such image of the old Yellow Tavern, I would love to see it and will dance a happy jig if any can be located!

Thanks in advance for any help with this image!

Sandy
 

Attachments


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Sep 10, 2013
Messages
1,418
Location
Mustered Out
The picture you posted is so small but I made out "Yellow Tavern" and "...Junction of the RR..." So I played with it and came up with a bigger version of your posted picture.

Which says "Warren's Station Yellow Tavern Junnction of Weldon USMRR; the General and his staff occupied the tents."
 

Attachments

ErnieMac

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
May 3, 2013
Messages
8,858
Location
Pennsylvania
The Union troops besieging Petersburg were supplied by a military railroad that ran behind the front lines. The depots were named after five prominent Union commanders (Birney Station, Meade Station, Hancock Station, Parke Station and Warren Station). Warren Station was at the end of the line near Globe Tavern. The building in the sketch appears to be Globe Tavern (see photo), I'm not sure why the sketch was titled Yellow Tavern.
33015r.jpg

"Globe Tavern" at Warren Station, R. R. in front of Petersburg
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,596
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
The Union troops besieging Petersburg were supplied by a military railroad that ran behind the front lines. The depots were named after five prominent Union commanders (Birney Station, Meade Station, Hancock Station, Parke Station and Warren Station). Warren Station was at the end of the line near Globe Tavern. The building in the sketch appears to be Globe Tavern (see photo), I'm not sure why the sketch was titled Yellow Tavern.View attachment 20494
"Globe Tavern" at Warren Station, R. R. in front of Petersburg
Great work folks !!!

GOUVERNEUR KEMBLE WARREN
P151.gif


Warren, Gouverneur K., major-general, was born at Cold
Spring Putnam county, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1830. He entered the
United States military academy in 1846; was graduated in 1850;
was assigned to the topographical engineers; was employed in
surveys on the lower Mississippi in 1850-54; in the West in
1855-59 as chief topographical engineer on Gen. William S.
Harney's staff, in the preparation of railroad maps in Dakota
and Nebraska, and was the first explorer of the Black hills.
In 1859 he became assistant professor of mathematics at West
Point; in May, 1861, lieutenant-colonel of the 5th N. Y.
infantry (Zouaves), and in August its colonel. At Big Bethel
he remained on the field to bring off the body of Lieut.
Greble. After serving before Yorktown he received command of a
brigade in Sykes' division, Porter's corps, on the right of the
Army of the Potomac. In that campaign he took part in various
battles; but was slightly wounded at Gaines' mill; was engaged
under Pope at Manassas; lost half of his regiment at Antietam;
was made brigadier-general of volunteers on Sept. 26, 1862, and
served under Burnside at Fredericksburg. On Feb. 2, 1863, he
was placed on Hooker's staff as chief of topographical-
engineers, and on June 8 was appointed chief engineer of the
Potomac. At Gettysburg on July 2, he occupied and defended
Little Round Top the key to the Federal position. In August he
was commissioned major-general of volunteers, dating from
Chancellorsville, May 3. On Oct. 14 he repulsed A. P. Hill at
Bristoe Station and was praised by Meade for "skill and
promptitude." At Mine run he used his discretion in not
carrying out a movement ordered by Meade and was approved for
so doing. From the reorganization of the army in March, 1864,
he had command of the 5th corps and led it in the bloody
actions of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, etc. He gave up his
volunteer commission on May 27, 1865, having been made captain
in the regular army in Sept., 1861 and major in June, 1864, and
having received in succession all the brevets up to major-
general. A soldier to the core, he never left the army,
conducted various surveys and reached the grade of lieutenant-
colonel in 1879. Gen. Warren died at Newport R. I., Aug 8,
1882.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 8
 


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top