Tell me more! Buying Remington New Model Army

Johnny676767

Private
Joined
Nov 30, 2020
I am looking for a Remington New Model Army revolver. Through this forum and some books I have, I think I know a little bit about what to look for. I was wondering if anyone had any other tips or information.

Here‘s what I am looking for:

1. Matching serial numbers under barrel, under grips on frame and on trigger guard (where, exactly, though?). This is difficult as I am looking online and/or can’t get the gun apart.

2. Inspector markings, which seem to usually be single initials, on different metal parts.

3. A legible patent marking on top of the barrel. Are all of these dated 1858?

4. Hopefully, an inspector’s cartouche on the wood, which I believe indicates acceptance by the ordinance department.

I don’t know serial number range, though. That seems to be important in determining manufacturing date. I‘d like a piece manufactured during the war.

In addition, I will be looking for general collector characteristics that appeal to me: an original or “attic” look, functional mechanics, minimal pitting, and an overall used but not damaged appearance.

I appreciate any pointers you may have.

Thanks
 

kenysd

Private
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
I have seen decent ones for under 1K.
matching number are not as important as with Colts.
condition, clear lettering, good grips. etc are more important in a Remmington.
a good action is a pluls, the Remingtons are not as easy to replace working parts as is the Colt.
bottom line...If you like it, buy it.
Ken. here is mine.

rem .ee 1.jpg
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
I am looking for a Remington New Model Army revolver. Through this forum and some books I have, I think I know a little bit about what to look for. I was wondering if anyone had any other tips or information.

Here‘s what I am looking for:

1. Matching serial numbers under barrel, under grips on frame and on trigger guard (where, exactly, though?). This is difficult as I am looking online and/or can’t get the gun apart.

2. Inspector markings, which seem to usually be single initials, on different metal parts.

3. A legible patent marking on top of the barrel. Are all of these dated 1858?

4. Hopefully, an inspector’s cartouche on the wood, which I believe indicates acceptance by the ordinance department.

I don’t know serial number range, though. That seems to be important in determining manufacturing date. I‘d like a piece manufactured during the war.

In addition, I will be looking for general collector characteristics that appeal to me: an original or “attic” look, functional mechanics, minimal pitting, and an overall used but not damaged appearance.

I appreciate any pointers you may have.

Thanks
I'm sure many others will comment on the above, so I will comment on a slightly different aspect: The earliest models were referred to as "Beals". Various modifications were made to different parts of the gun, until a final standard version was adopted. I need to check my serial number ranges or find you a link that explains all of this (will look it up for you later). The guns that were made during the experimental phase between Beals and the final version are called "transitionals". These "transitionals have a mix of features. You need to be aware of this and decide which version and/or features you want. Myself, I have a "transitional" which incorporates most of the final design features, but retains the original Beals German cone sight (essentially a brass pointed bead).

In my opinion, the worst Remington's are the ones where the cylinder pin was allowed to slide fully forward/backward when the loading lever was still in the closed/locked position. Remington cut out a groove to allow that to slide in that position, but they didn't realize that recoil could cause the cylinder pin to slide. Troops in combat found that the pin slid which caused the cylinder to fall out/get jammed. Needless to say, Remington realized their mistake after several thousand were made like that, and stopped cutting out that groove. I don't have the precise serial number range of that version, but I am certain it was below the 20,000 range.

Sorry I can't give you all the detailed info at the moment, but I will do so later after work, and quite possibly others will have already filled in the details by then. Good luck on your quest. The NMAs are great guns! In good shooting condition, all matching, everything fits and operates tight, bare metal (no original bluing, nor is it heavily pitted from rust) I'd say you you'd be paying at least $1200 USD, and likely a few hundred more than that.

Here are a few pics to get your juices flowing....In the first pic, note how the cylinder pin is locked in place by the ramrod....now imagine a channel cut out along the ramrod that would allow the cylinder pin to slide forward (you would see a gap between the ramrod and the barrel when the ramrod is is in the locked/ready to fire position....if you see one of those versions, don't buy it if you plan to actually shoot it).
20190324_100415.jpg


2nd pic shows the German Cone Sight (brass); "final" version was a flat iron blade sight, which gave the user a finer aim point and a better target image through the sights (i.e. german cone essentially blocked the ability to view the target through the sights).
20190324_102508.jpg


3rd pic shows the cylinder, with the safety cutouts between the nipples. Note also the condition of the ratchet cutouts (the condition here is very good; be careful not to buy a gun with heavily worn ratchets or the cylinder will function poorly).

20190324_100200.jpg


Final pic just shows the other side. If you look carefully, you can see the rectangular cartouche on the wooden grip below the screw.
20190324_095758.jpg
 
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ucvrelics

Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
I am looking for a Remington New Model Army revolver. Through this forum and some books I have, I think I know a little bit about what to look for. I was wondering if anyone had any other tips or information.

Here‘s what I am looking for:

1. Matching serial numbers under barrel, under grips on frame and on trigger guard (where, exactly, though?). This is difficult as I am looking online and/or can’t get the gun apart.

2. Inspector markings, which seem to usually be single initials, on different metal parts.

3. A legible patent marking on top of the barrel. Are all of these dated 1858?

4. Hopefully, an inspector’s cartouche on the wood, which I believe indicates acceptance by the ordinance department.

I don’t know serial number range, though. That seems to be important in determining manufacturing date. I‘d like a piece manufactured during the war.

In addition, I will be looking for general collector characteristics that appeal to me: an original or “attic” look, functional mechanics, minimal pitting, and an overall used but not damaged appearance.

I appreciate any pointers you may have
The Remington New Model came in 2 versions. @ line address and 3 line address. Here is all the info from Flaydermans. Disregard the price as this is from the 2nd edition.

Revolver was manufactured by Remington Arms, Ilion, New York. Marks: Barrel is marked: PATENTED SEPT. 14, 1858 / E. REMINGTON & SONS. ILION. NEW YORK. U.S.A., (two line address is earlier production). Serial number under the barrel. Cartouche on wood on left grip indicates government inspection, additional marks on barrel and frame, cylinder, and trigger guard. Standard features included octagon barrel, barrel threads are visible, round cylinder with safety notches, loading lever has long hinge, cylinder is removed by pulling the cylinder pin forward after releasing the loading lever, iron backstrap is integral with frame, walnut grips, brass trigger guard. The New Model 1861 numbers after about 15,000 following the sequence started with the old model Army.

Barrel is marked: PATENTED SEPT. 14, 1858 / E. REMINGTON & SONS. ILION. NEW YORK. U.S.A. / NEW - MODEL, (three line address is later production). Serial number under the barrel. Cartouche on wood on left grip indicates government inspection, additional marks on barrel and frame, cylinder, and trigger guard. Standard features included octagon barrel, barrel threads are visible, round cylinder with safety notches, loading lever has long hinge, cylinder is removed by pulling the cylinder pin forward after releasing the loading lever, iron backstrap is integral with frame, walnut grips, brass trigger guard. The New Model 1861 numbers after about 15,000 following the sequence started with the old Model Army.
IMG_20210301_095924978.jpg
IMG_20210301_095911973.jpg
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
"The New Model 1861 numbers after about 15,000 following the sequence started with the old Model Army."

Officially, that is the serial number, but the first several thousand were "transitionals", with a mix of Beals features and new features. And the army and Remington were still tinkering for a while after that. My NMA "transitional" is in the 19,XXX serial range, and it has the Beals sight (gotta check carefully to see if any other Beals features are evident...my memory sucks!).

One other thing...about 1,000 NMAs were sold to New Jersey, and they are stamped with an NJ. These guns were originally rejected by the US Government, and were considered "2nd rate" as a result. None of those stamped NJ were ever issued to soldiers. Personally, I wouldn't buy one of those though I have heard others say they work/shoot just fine.
 
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