Burkett brother against brother

zburkett

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
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1,330
Location
Orange County, Virginia
#1
My great grandfather had brothers on both sides. George Washington Burkett joined the Arkansas 8th at age 17 and bought through the war. Andrew Jackson Burkett had moved to Iowa before the war and joined the Union army and was disowned by the family. It was fairly easy to find out about George Washington Burkett but I can find no record (on the internet) of Andrew Jackson Burkett. Is this a fluke or is it really easier to track down Confederate ancestors than Union?
 

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#2
My great grandfather had brothers on both sides. George Washington Burkett joined the Arkansas 8th at age 17 and bought through the war. Andrew Jackson Burkett had moved to Iowa before the war and joined the Union army and was disowned by the family. It was fairly easy to find out about George Washington Burkett but I can find no record (on the internet) of Andrew Jackson Burkett. Is this a fluke or is it really easier to track down Confederate ancestors than Union?
Here's closest I could come. If you believe this is him I can post unit info.

- Roster & Record of Iowa Soldiers in the War of Rebellion

Anderson J. Burkett

Residence Davenport IA; 31 years old.

Enlisted on 9/14/1861 as a Private.

On 9/14/1861 he mustered into "G" Co. IA 2nd Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 10/3/1864 at Davenport, IA


Intra Regimental Company Transfers:
* 10/1/1861 from company G to company A


Other Information:
born in Ohio
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,010
Location
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#4
Wow, THANKS. It could be Andrew got recorded as Anderson. I would like to know more about the unit.
Second Cavalry IOWA
(3 YEARS)

Second Cavalry. Cols., Washington L. Elliott, Edward Hatch,
Datus E. Coon, Lieut.-Cols., Edward Hatch, William P. Hepburn,
Charles C. Horton; Majs., Edward Hatch, William P. Hepburn,
Datus E. Coon, Hiram W. Love, Frank A. Kendrick, William W.
Eaton, Charles C. Horton, Gustavus Schnitzer, Charles P.
Moore, Samuel Foster. The 2nd cavalry was mustered in at
Davenport Aug. 25, 1861, and March, 1862, found it aiding Gen.
Pope in the reduction of New Madrid and Island No. 10, a squad
of the regiment being the first Union soldiers to enter the
works at the latter place. By May 1st, Pope's army was
assisting in the celebrated siege of Corinth, which followed
the battle of Shiloh, and on May 9 the 2nd made the famous
charge at Farmington, in which 100 men were unhorsed and half
as many killed or wounded. On May 28 the regiment with the
2nd Mich. cavalry, dashed around to the south of Corinth in
the night, destroyed the railroad in the Confederate rear
together with large supplies, and captured many prisoners. On
July 1st, these same regiments fought the cavalry battle of
Booneville. With September of 1862, hard riding, scouts and
skirmishes commenced again. After a ride of 45 miles and
skirmishing with the enemy, the regiment stood to horse all
night at the battle of Iuka. Soon came the battle of Corinth,
and the extent of that victory was greatly added to by the
extraordinary activity, by day and by night, of the 2nd Ia.
cavalry. "It has been the eye of the army," said Rosecrans
with truth, for it had guarded every road in the vicinity,
scouted everywhere, and at last was present in the battle. In
November and December, the regiment took a constant and
important part in Grant's great move through central
Mississippi toward Vicksburg. It was present at the
unnecessary defeat at Coffeeville, where the Union troops
engaged were barely saved from utter rout and the regiment
lost 22 men killed and wounded. It then followed Grant's army
as a rear-guard in its retreat toward Memphis and went into
winter quarters at Lagrange. The early spring saw it riding
all over northern Mississippi in little expeditions and
scouts, and by April 16 it was ready to start on what was
known as the Grierson raid. "This was one of the most
brilliant cavalry exploits of the war," said Gen. Grant. The
regiment then went to Memphis, where it remained in quiet till
the end of November. On March 28, 1864, many of the regiment
reenlisted as veterans and in April went to Iowa on furlough.
The following summer was largely spent in raiding and scouting
through Mississippi and middle Tennessee, without any
engagements of great consequence, although it participated in
the fight at Tupelo. But by the middle of November it was
engaged in the hardest campaign of its history -- resisting
Hood's invasion of Tennessee. With headquarters near
Florence, Ala., it watched and fought his advance step by -
step, formed with Coon's brigade the rear-guard of the Federal
army as it fell back to Franklin, and in the battle there
played an important part on the left. Then followed the
battle of Nashville, in which the gallant regiment, with the
whole of Hatch's division, dismounted and fought as infantry,
storming and capturing forts and driving the enemy in dismay.
This was the regiment's last active campaign. The following
spring and summer were passed in unimportant duties in
Mississippi and in Oct. 1865, it was mustered out. Its losses
during its term of service were as follows: deaths from
battle, 69; deaths from disease, 196; wounded, 173;
discharged, 171.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4

***********************************************************************************

Report of Maj. Datus E. Coon, Second Iowa Cavalry.

LA GRANGE, TENN. July 17, 1863.
SIR: I have to report the following in regard to the recent scout to
and skirmish at Jackson, Tenn.:

According to order received on the night of the 11th, my command (the
Second Iowa Cavalry) was in the saddle at 4 a.m. of the 12th. The
two 12-pounder howitzers were also in column and amply provided with
all necessary ammunition. Taking the Bolivar road, we were at 12 m.
in that place, a distance of 22 miles. After a halt of a few moments, we
moved forward northward, when we soon struck the Big Hatchie River, and
on crossing discovered the railroad bridge across the same and the
trestle-work on the north side had been set on fire; the bridge entirely
burned down; and the trestle-work also nearly consumed. On inquiry,
learned from a negro that it was done by [R. R.] White's band of
guerrillas, which was then encamped some 8 miles distant. My command
having the advance, I moved forward cautiously for some 7 miles, when
two guns were fired in front, and the advance company gave chase to two
soldiers (a patrol), running them into their camp before they could give
the alarm. The company in pursuit came upon them at Clover Creek, near
a church, where they were at the time, some 30 in number, amusing
themselves at a game of cards. The scattering of hats, boots, coats,
knapsacks, &c., can be more easily imagined than described. It is
sufficient to say that while our men were giving them two or three shots
each from their revolving rifles, they skedaddled, some bootless and
hatless, others guiding their horses by a simple rope halter. We camped
that night at Foon's plantation, on the same creek.

On Monday, the 13th, nothing of interest transpired until orders were
received to move three saber companies to the front, when within
miles of Jackson. The three companies ordered up were E, L, and M,
Capt. William W. Eaton commanding.

By order, I remained some ten minutes for the balance of the command,
which were then waiting for the lead horses to pass a narrow defile on
the bridge. As soon as over, my rifles were formed in squadron column
on the right of the Michigan cavalry. But very soon there was a general
strife to see who should be first to charge the town, which was fairly
done by the three companies above mentioned. They charged the town
and penetrated it in almost every conceivable direction. In
one instance they were met by a superior force, and the street blockaded,
but by a flank movement to the right and left they succeeded in capturing
some 20 of the enemy's cavalry. In one place the conflict was so close
between Company M and a superior force of Forrest's men that one man,
named H. H. Burner, had a hand-to-hand fight after exhausting all the
weapons in his hands.

At this time Second Lieut. John K. Humphrey was very seriously
wounded, and taken to the nearest house. While this was being enacted
to the front, the left flank was furiously attacked by Col. Biffle's,
regiment (Ninth [Nineteenth] Tennessee Cavalry), and on my arrival at
that point I sent an orderly to Lieut. Belden, directing him to say
that should he need assistance he would send for me upon that street.
At this time the enemy was pressing two companies advanced as
skirmishers very hard, and threatened to drive in our entire left flank.
Having sent, by order of Col. Hatch, two rifle companies to the
front to support the three carbine companies, I could only dismount
two companies (B and F), and send them to the support of the infantry,
the balance of my regiment having been detained at the bridge by led
horses and teams. But in due time the First Battalion, Capt. Charles
C. Horton commanding, arrived, when I sent them to the left of the
infantry, that I might, if possible, drive in the enemy's right. About
this time Lieut. Reed, with one howitzer, arrived. I ordered it
planted immediately, which was done, and several shells were thrown
into the midst of a squad at a distance of near 600 yards. The effect
was good. The enemy soon left, not being able to keep steady amid
the explosion of shell.

Immediately after the rebels had dispersed, a white flag appeared in
the road running north, and waved there for some five minutes, when I
directed a mounted orderly to advance with a white handkerchief and
ascertain the cause. In a short time he returned, and reported that the
flag was displayed to protect wounded soldiers in a house near by.

Col. Hatch then ordered me to collect my men and pursue as fast
as possible. In a few moments all were up, and, throwing out heavy
flanking companies, I moved forward as fast as practicable through thick
timber and undergrowth. On advancing some 3 miles, we came to the
conclusion that there had been but a small squad retreating on that road;
but owing to the long march of the day, besides the engagement, which
occupied from 12.30 p.m. until 5.30 p.m., we halted and camped for the
night at 7 miles distance from Jackson.

Early in the morning of the 14th, I moved back to Jackson, forming
a line of battle facing the east, where I remained until about 10 a.m.,
when I received orders to move toward La Grange, on the road we came.

On the 15th, my men assisted in building a floating bridge over the
Big Hatchie at Estanaula, which was done, and the command crossed
over in some eight hours.

On the night of the 15th, we camped 24 miles north of La Grange,
reaching camp at the same place some time before sunset of the 16th.

The entire casualties of this engagement were Second Lieut. John K.
Humphrey, Company M, wounded by musket ball, and also by a spent ball
in left shoulder blade, and Second Lieut. Frank L. Stoddard, Company B,
elbow dislocated by being thrown from his mule in the charge,
and 2 men only missing.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DATUS E. COON,
Maj., Commanding Second Iowa Cavalry.

N. B. BAKER, Adjutant-Gen. State of Iowa.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXVI.] SKIRMISHES ON FORKED DEER RIVER, TENN., ETC. PAGE 677-37
[Series I. Vol. 24. Part II, Reports. Serial No. 37.]

**************************************************************************************
 

Dave Wilma

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 12, 2011
Messages
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Location
Elliott Bay
#5
My second GGF was David Morgan who migrated from Floyd County, Kentucky to Paris, Illinois in the 1850s. His oldest son, Thomas remained behind. When the call for volunteers went out, David's son David enlisted in the 21st Illinois (trained by a former army captain named Grant) and served throughout the war. His brother Thomas was drafted or enlisted into a cavalry unit. I lost track of Thomas after 1868. David settled in Louisiana then Oklahoma.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 8, 2015
Messages
3
#7
My great grandfather had brothers on both sides. George Washington Burkett joined the Arkansas 8th at age 17 and bought through the war. Andrew Jackson Burkett had moved to Iowa before the war and joined the Union army and was disowned by the family. It was fairly easy to find out about George Washington Burkett but I can find no record (on the internet) of Andrew Jackson Burkett. Is this a fluke or is it really easier to track down Confederate ancestors than Union?
 

zburkett

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
1,330
Location
Orange County, Virginia
#12
I realize we both put our numbers out there but I think its worth it. Part of the family history is while Andrew Jackson Burkett had been disowned by the rest of the family, after the war he returned with his son and was "warmly welcomed" by my great grandfather James Madison Burkett. Learning more about my great great uncle is worth a phone call.
 

zburkett

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Messages
1,330
Location
Orange County, Virginia
#15
Don't mind me. I'm just teasing you. :smile:
I know. But this is the best of the forum. I have pushed my known family history back a century. The first George Washington Burkett was not named after the president. He was named after the wart hero. He was born before George Washington became president. When you are trying to learn where you came from, finding that out is a thrill. Thanks forum, thanks Bill.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2019
Messages
17
Location
Virginia
#16
My great grandfather had brothers on both sides. George Washington Burkett joined the Arkansas 8th at age 17 and bought through the war. Andrew Jackson Burkett had moved to Iowa before the war and joined the Union army and was disowned by the family. It was fairly easy to find out about George Washington Burkett but I can find no record (on the internet) of Andrew Jackson Burkett. Is this a fluke or is it really easier to track down Confederate ancestors than Union?
Um. Yes we might actually be related because MY genealogy follows GW Burkett.....
 

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