Burial of Union Soldiers 2nd Battle Manassas

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#1
My great grandfather and his three brothers all fought in the Civil War. Three for the north and one for the south. Obviously, my great grandfather survived but his three brothers did not. I have found the graves for everyone but Thomas Sutton who was killed Aug 30, 1862 during the 2nd Battle of Manassas. I can't seem to find information on what happened to the Union dead after this battle and where they could possibly be buried. Thomas was in the 7th regiment, company C, Wisconsin Infantry. Any help is very appreciated. FYI My great grandfather was an officer in the First Missouri Engineers of the West for over three years. He was discharged and reinlisted two months later with the 7th regiment Wisconsin Calvary where he stayed until the wars end. He took part in 42 engagements. He was at the seige of Vickburg and the capture of Island 10. His brother, James, was taken prisoner and died in Andersonville as a POW. His brother John, serving with the Confederates left to go to war and never heard of again. He died in Texas in 1866 and is buried in the Antioch Cemetery, Anderson, Texas.
 
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#2
Welcome from the UK and from The First Bull Run/ Manassas Forum

I'm afraid I know a lot less about the second battle than the first and I guess that you already know that 2nd Bull Run was the 7th Wisconsin's first major battle despite being raised the previous year (though there it fought on both the 28th and the 30th August as part of John Gibbons 4th brigade (3 Wisconsin regiments and an Indiana regiment) of the 1st Division of Mcdowell's 3rd Corps.)

As to the specific question about where he and the other Union dead were buried I am afraid I do not know.
 

Zella

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Thanks for posting! I must confess I do not know the answer to your question, but I suspect someone will be along shortly who will know!

P.S. I asked for your thread to be moved to the Ancestry forum. We have some really sharp and knowledgeable genealogists on the site, and I thought they'd have a better chance of seeing your question and responding if it was over here in Ancestry. Welcome! :smile:
 

WJC

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Welcome! That's quite a family involvement in the war: hope we can help you find more information! Meanwhile, be sure to join the discussions going on: new perspectives are always appreciated! Enjoy!
 
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Do you mean where they were buried after the battle or where they are buried today? After the war an attempt was made to move all Union dead to National Cemeteries. I suspect the closest one would be Arlington. Of course he may not have been identified; many weren't.
I have seen information about where the confederate soldiers ended up being buried but nothing on the Union soldiers. Will look at all the National cemeteries. The Sutton who died at Andersonville is buried right there so I wondered if they buried the dead right at Bull Run. I never give up - I'll find him!! Blessings, Liz
 

ebg12

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Don’t forget, you have 4 great grandfathers you can research as to their participation in the civil war. So far, only knowing the participation of 1 out 4 will give you only 25 percent of your heritage as it relates to the civil war armies.
 
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I have information on the four soldiers but just wanted to close my research with a burial location for the one I can't find. I am very proud of the service to the country by my ancestors. Going back to the revolutionary war, world war I, world war II, Korea, and Vietnam. My cousin did three tours of Vietnam! They all make me a proud American. Blessings, Liz
 
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#13
The Union dead after the Battle of Second Manassas (Bull Run) were hastily buried where they fell. There they remained until just after the war when all federal dead from the battle that could be found were gathered up and reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery. I'm guessing most or nearly all burials at this time (1866) were unidentified and marked "Unknown". It is extremely likely Thomas B. Sutton lies in peace at Arlington in the vault below.
In Arlington National Cemetery located in Section 2 is the Civil War Unknown Monument, the first memorial at Arlington National Cemetery dedicated to unknown soldiers. Dedicated in 1866, the sarcophagus sits atop a burial vault containing the remains of 2,111 unknown soldiers recovered from Bull Run and the road to Rappahannock. The assumption is that the vault contains the remains of both Union and Confederate soldiers.
1555781114740.png
 
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#14
The Union dead after the Battle of Second Manassas (Bull Run) were hastily buried where they fell. There they remained until just after the war when all federal dead from the battle that could be found were gathered up and reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery. I'm guessing most or nearly all burials at this time (1866) were unidentified and marked "Unknown". It is extremely likely Thomas B. Sutton lies in peace at Arlington in the vault below.
In Arlington National Cemetery located in Section 2 is the Civil War Unknown Monument, the first memorial at Arlington National Cemetery dedicated to unknown soldiers. Dedicated in 1866, the sarcophagus sits atop a burial vault containing the remains of 2,111 unknown soldiers recovered from Bull Run and the road to Rappahannock. The assumption is that the vault contains the remains of both Union and Confederate soldiers. View attachment 303614
Thank you so much for this information. It makes sense and think I will stop looking for my great uncle's grave. I hope he is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, a place of honor for all soldiers. Blessings, Liz
 

kholland

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#15
My great grandfather and his three brothers all fought in the Civil War. Three for the north and one for the south. Obviously, my great grandfather survived but his three brothers did not. I have found the graves for everyone but Thomas Sutton who was killed Aug 30, 1862 during the 2nd Battle of Manassas. I can't seem to find information on what happened to the Union dead after this battle and where they could possibly be buried. Thomas was in the 7th regiment, company C, Wisconsin Infantry. Any help is very appreciated. FYI My great grandfather was an officer in the First Missouri Engineers of the West for over three years. He was discharged and reinlisted two months later with the 7th regiment Wisconsin Calvary where he stayed until the wars end. He took part in 42 engagements. He was at the seige of Vickburg and the capture of Island 10. His brother, James, was taken prisoner and died in Andersonville as a POW. His brother John, serving with the Confederates left to go to war and never heard of again. He died in Texas in 1866 and is buried in the Antioch Cemetery, Anderson, Texas.


According to this website Private Thomas Sutton was the only man from Company C killed on August 30th. Listed as wounded from his company on this day were:

Wounded - Captain T. B. Quimby, head. Private - F. Norderg, head.

The site is a rather detailed overview of casualties and battle action in the Manassass/Maryland campaign for the 7th Wisconsin. Of course the Battle of Brawner's Farm (near Gainsville VA) on August 28th was the baptism of fire for the Iron Brigade when they went toe to toe with the Stonewall Brigade.

http://www.secondwi.com/fromthefront/7th wis/1862/7thsept62.htm
 



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