Bucephalas

diane

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Always liked the story of Alexander when Bucephalus became ill and he wanted him cured - he would kill anyone who told him his horse was dead! Alexander's temper was legendary, so when the horse did die there was a lot of discussion about who was going to commit suicide and tell the king his horse was gone! Finally an old fellow said he'd do it - he'd lived a good long life anyway. So, he went in and Alexander demanded to know how the horse was. "He does not move," said the old man, "he does not eat, he does not have a heart beat, he does not breathe..." "Does not have a heart beat, does not breathe!" exclaimed the king. "Then he must be dead! I said I would kill whoever told me my horse was dead!" Alexander grabbed his sword and the old man said, "I did not tell you your horse was dead. YOU have said it yourself."
 

JPK Huson 1863

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Nothing beyond that?

It's from 2008. I'm guessing part of a mini forum of Civil War mounts, or series of posts. Wonder what Price called him for short? It'd be a mouthful in a big hurry " Get me Bucephalas! ", if anyone could spit that out when excited. You know how you cycle through all your kid's names, too, before you hit on the one who is in trouble? WiTOM, GABIKEDARN IT! It'd be a problem.

Diane, 1st thread read today, already learned something- thank you! Are you sure you're not a college prof killing time on sabbatical?
 

diane

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Jan 23, 2010
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State of Jefferson
It's from 2008. I'm guessing part of a mini forum of Civil War mounts, or series of posts. Wonder what Price called him for short? It'd be a mouthful in a big hurry " Get me Bucephalas! ", if anyone could spit that out when excited. You know how you cycle through all your kid's names, too, before you hit on the one who is in trouble? WiTOM, GABIKEDARN IT! It'd be a problem.

Diane, 1st thread read today, already learned something- thank you! Are you sure you're not a college prof killing time on sabbatical?

:redface: Oh, you give me too much credit! I like Alexander - another of those hot tempered military guys... :laugh: His Bucephalus was buried in Pakistan, having been severely wounded in a pivotal fight there that gave the Greeks control of the area. Philip had bought him from a breeder of Thessalonian stock - very large, tough horses - but he was too spooky to ride until Alexander noticed he was scared of his shadow. All he did was turn him so he couldn't see it!

Sterling Price's noble steed, however, was said to be a very beautiful white or grey horse. Wonder what happened to it, if it survived the war?
 

donna

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Now Florida but always a Kentuckian
I tried doing some research on Sterling Price's horse. It was the one he rode on his 1864 raid into Missouri. I can't find out if he survived the war. It is always interesting to find out what happened to different general's horses.
 

James N.

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Price on Bucephalus in Don't Yield an Inch by Andy Thomas depicts the pair at the Battle of Wilson's Creek.
 
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