Breechldrs British use of Sharp's Carbines during the Indian Munity.

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
The 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars received Sharp's Carbines in 1857 and used them for about ten years. It appears the Sharp's gave good service during the Indian Munity. The 7th Hussars used them at Lucknow in 1858. When the 7th Hussars were issued Snider breech-loading carbines in November of 1868 their Sharp's Carbines were put in storage.
 

KianGaf

First Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
The 7th (Queen's Own) Hussars received Sharp's Carbines in 1857 and used them for about ten years. It appears the Sharp's gave good service during the Indian Munity. The 7th Hussars used them at Lucknow in 1858. When the 7th Hussars were issued Snider breech-loading carbines in November of 1868 their Sharp's Carbines were put in storage.

The Siege of Lucknow is an interesting episode. I haven’t delved too much into the colonial history of the Indian sub continent but remember seeing a tour of the residency site on English tv one time.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Most nations like to go with arms made it their home country. Thid supports local businesses. Is there a reason the British would go with a US carbine? I am not sure if the British had a good carbine at the time.
 

KianGaf

First Sergeant
Joined
May 29, 2019
Location
Dublin, Ireland
Most nations like to go with arms made it their home country. Thid supports local businesses. Is there a reason the British would go with a US carbine? I am not sure if the British had a good carbine at the time.

The East India Company was still in charge at that stage so could be the reason.
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
In March, 1856, the British government contracted for 6,000 Sharps carbines, and they were all delivered between May, 1856 and April, 1858, obviously some in time for the Indian Mutiny.
Cashier & Terry carbines were also issued.

As for the East India Company, it was many of their sepoys who deserted and fought against the British. Some regular British regiments were, in fact, used to put down the rebellion.
 

mrockwell

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
12021 Birch Dr., Corning, NY
That's good to know. I collect British longarms and hadn't heard that. Guess if I ever find a British Ordnance marked Sharps, I'll have some idea what it is.
I own an Enlish Sharps. It has the Maynard tapesystem and it caliber is 577 rather than 54. The barrel length is 20" which is shorter than your standard US Sharps and seems to be rather well balanced. A friend of mine brought it back from Afghanistan where he was stationed a few years ago.
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
I own an Enlish Sharps. It has the Maynard tapesystem and it caliber is 577 rather than 54. The barrel length is 20" which is shorter than your standard US Sharps and seems to be rather well balanced. A friend of mine brought it back from Afghanistan where he was stationed a few years ago.
That's good to hear that you have one. And you're right, the example I have in my reference book does show a Maynard tape door in front of the hammer.
I would be very curious to know what markings it has, particularly British Ordnance markings, and exactly where they are located. Hopefully yours hasn't been sanded or otherwise messed with.
 

CowCavalry

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 17, 2017
I own an Enlish Sharps. It has the Maynard tapesystem and it caliber is 577 rather than 54. The barrel length is 20" which is shorter than your standard US Sharps and seems to be rather well balanced. A friend of mine brought it back from Afghanistan where he was stationed a few years ago.
I was about to surmise that they were probably issued the Enfield cartridge until I remembered that the way the ball is orientated, that wouldn't have worked.
 

mrockwell

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
12021 Birch Dr., Corning, NY
That's good to hear that you have one. And you're right, the example I have in my reference book does show a Maynard tape door in front of the hammer.
I would be very curious to know what markings it has, particularly British Ordnance markings, and exactly where they are located. Hopefully yours hasn't been sanded or otherwise messed with.
Give me a few days and I'll get it. The carbine is stored in a museum and even though I own it I still have to abide by the rules.
 

mrockwell

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
12021 Birch Dr., Corning, NY
Give me a few days and I'll get it. The carbine is stored in a museum and even though I own it I still have to abide by the rules.
I hope that this is some help to you. The picture isn't the greatest. I have to use a better camera from the museum. Other than the standard Maynard and Sharps marks this is what is in the buttplate (or what I could get anyways).

P1010192.JPG
 

OldSarge79

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 12, 2017
Location
Pisgah Forest, North Carolina
I hope that this is some help to you. The picture isn't the greatest. I have to use a better camera from the museum. Other than the standard Maynard and Sharps marks this is what is in the buttplate (or what I could get anyways).

View attachment 403068
Interesting. Thanks for doing this for me. Are there three letters there, K D... ? Any British Ordnance marks anywhere?
 

mrockwell

Private
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Location
12021 Birch Dr., Corning, NY
Interesting. Thanks for doing this for me. Are there three letters there, K D... ? Any British Ordnance marks anywhere?
67th Tigers was right on the buttplate markings. If you blow up the picture it is noticeable. There is a round touchmark on the left side of the barrel. The only other marks are the Maynard marks and what's left of the Sharp's address. Unfortunantly we can't ask the owner because he was killed.

P1010187.JPG


P1010189.JPG


P1010194.JPG
 

JeffBrooks

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Location
Manor, TX
The Siege of Lucknow is an interesting episode. I haven’t delved too much into the colonial history of the Indian sub continent but remember seeing a tour of the residency site on English tv one time.
The best single work on the Indian Mutiny is probably Saul David's. For a general overview of the colonial wars of Victorian Britain, I recommend Queen Victoria's Little Wars by Byron Farwell, which is an absolutely delightful read.
 
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