Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
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Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins was born on Edisto Island in 1839. After his graduation at the South Carolina military academy, at the head of his class, he with the co-operation of his classmate, Asbury Coward, founded the King's Mountain military school in 1855. His military genius was valuable in the first organization of troops in 1861, and he was elected colonel of the Fifth regiment, with which he went to Virginia, in the brigade of Gen. D. R. Jones. In the latter part of 1861 he was in command of that brigade, and had grown greatly in favor with his division commander, General Longstreet. Longstreet proposed to begin the reorganization, a matter approached with much misgiving, in this brigade, and he declared that he hoped to hold every man in it if Jenkins could be promoted brigadier-general. ‘Besides being much liked by his men, Colonel Jenkins is one of the finest officers of this army,’ Longstreet wrote. Beauregard also added his approval to this recommendation. Still in the rank of colonel, Palmetto sharpshooters, he commanded R. H. Anderson's brigade in the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines, and was warmly commended by Longstreet and D. H. Hill and by J. E. B. Stuart, whom he supported at Fort Magruder. He was again distinguished at Gaines' Mill, and at Frayser's Farm, having been ordered to silence a battery, Longstreet supposing he would use his sharpshooters alone, he threw forward his brigade and captured the guns, bringing on the battle. July 22, 1862, he was promoted brigadier-general, and continuing in command of the same brigade, participated in the battles of August 29th and 30th, Second Manassas, and was severely wounded. He was on duty again at the battle of Fredericksburg and during the Suffolk campaign, his division now being commanded by General Pickett, and was on the Blackwater under Gen. D. H. Hill, during the Gettysburg campaign. When Longstreet was sent to the assistance of Bragg at Chattanooga, Jenkins' brigade was transferred to Hood's division, and reached the field of Chickamauga after the battle. During the investment of Chattanooga he commanded the attack upon the Federal reinforcements arriving under Hooker, and then accompanied Longstreet in the Knoxville campaign, commanding Hood's division. He took a conspicuous part in the operations in east Tennessee, and then, early in 1864, returned to Northern Virginia. Field was now in charge of the division, and Jenkins led his famous old brigade to battle on May 6th, the second day of the Wilderness fighting, when the splendid veterans of the First corps arrived in time to check the current of threatened disaster. As he rode by the side of Longstreet, he said to his chief, ‘I am happy. I have felt despair for the cause for some months, but now I am relieved, and feel assured that we will put the enemy across the Rapidan before night.’ Immediately afterward, by the mistaken fire of another body of Confederates, he and Longstreet were both wounded, Jenkins mortally. General Longstreet has written of him: ‘He was one of the most estimable characters of the army. His taste and talent were for military service. He was intelligent, quick, untiring, attentive, zealous in discharge of duty, truly faithful to official obligations, abreast with the foremost in battle, and withal a humble, noble Christian. In a moment of highest earthly hope, he was transported to serenest heavenly joy; to that life beyond that knows no bugle call, beat of drum or clash of steel. May his beautiful spirit, through the mercy of God, rest in peace! Amen!’
 

Bowen

Private
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Aug 8, 2013
Location
New York
Jenkins and his brigade were wearing new uniforms of bluish gray and that confused Mahone's men who thought they were Federals. Jenkins's fine (and large) brigade could have been used to good effect at either the Wheatfield or Peach Orchard in Gettysburg on July, 2, 1863 but they along with Montgomery Corse's Virginia brigade were detached from Pickett's division.
 

Bowen

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Aug 8, 2013
Location
New York
There was an unfortunate rivalry between Micah Jenkins and his fellow South Carolinian Evander Law as to who should command Hood's Division (Jenkins had seniority but Law had been with the division a lot longer) and that created a poisonous atmosphere in Hood's division to which Jenkins' Brigade was assigned to after Gettysburg.
 

OldReliable1862

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 2, 2017
Location
Georgia
For whatever reason, Micah Jenkins is one of my favorite Confederate brigadiers. He was truly an excellent commander and seems to have been a friendly, likeable man. The image of him, pale with sickness, throwing his arm around Moxley Sorrel saying, "We shall smash them now" is a very poignant one. If they really do make this Wilderness movie, I'm hoping Jenkins shows up.

In honor of the 'Prince of Edisto', I would like to ask the officers of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, @lelliott19 and @Nathanb1, approve the creation of an organziation to be called the 'Knights of Edisto' in honor of the Confederate "boy generals" like Jenkins.
 
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AUG

Major
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Nov 20, 2012
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lelliott19

Brigadier General
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Mar 15, 2013
In honor of the 'Prince of Edisto', I would like to ask the officers of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, @lelliott19 and @Nathanb1, approve the creation of an organziation to be called, the 'Knights of Edisto" in honor of the Confederate "boy generals" like Jenkins.
I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, hereby dub thee, @OldReliable1862 , a Knight of Edisto!

Arise, brave knight, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, and gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my knight, and go forth!
 
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Joined
Sep 28, 2013
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Southwest Mississippi
I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, hereby dub thee, @OldReliable1862 , a Knight of Edisto!

Arise, brave knight, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, and gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my knight, and go forth!
:rofl:
 

OldReliable1862

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 2, 2017
Location
Georgia
I, lelliott, being an officer in good standing <ummm cough> of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, hereby dub thee, @OldReliable1862 , a Knight of Edisto!

Arise, brave knight, and go forth to honor all the "boy generals" and young officers who gave their life for the cause for which they fought: the intelligent and zealous young Brigadier General Micah Jenkins, the gallant Major John Pelham, and the courageous Colonel Isaac Avery, of the CS Army. The valiant Lieut. Willie Grout (the youngest Union officer killed in the Civil War,) the fearless Bvt. Brigadier General Henry Livermore Abbott, and the heroic Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing (honored a century and a half late,) of the US Army. And all the other young men, noted for feats of courage, who committed to the cause in which they believed, and gave their lives while so doing. Arise, my knight, and go forth!
I shall accept this honor conferred upon me with great humility and charity, seeking to behave in a manner befitting this noble order.

Anyone else who wishes to join the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club or the Knights of Edisto, please see either myself, @lelliott19, or @Nathanb1 to have the proper initiation ceremonies conducted.
 

James N.

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For whatever reason, Micah Jenkins is one of my favorite Confederate brigadiers. He was truly an excellent commander and seems to have been a friendly, likeable man. The image of him, pale with sickness, throwing his arm around Moxley Sorrel saying, "We shall smash them now" is a very poignant one. If they really do make this Wilderness movie, I'm hoping Jenkins shows up.

In honor of the 'Prince of Edisto', I would like to ask the officers of the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club, @lelliott19 and @Nathanb1, approve the creation of an organziation to be called the 'Knights of Edisto' in honor of the Confederate "boy generals" like Jenkins.
One person who definitely would have declined membership is Confederate Brigadier General Evander Law. The Alabamian was highly miffed when, after succeeding Hood in command of his division at Gettysburg after the latter was seriously wounded, he was replaced by what he thought was a Longstreet-led clique that unfairly favored Jenkins over him.
 
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lelliott19

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I shall accept this honor conferred upon me with great humility and charity, seeking to behave in a manner befitting this noble order.
Excellent!
Anyone else who wishes to join the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club or the Knights of Edisto, please see either myself, @lelliott19, or @Nathanb1 to have the proper initiation ceremonies conducted.
In case anyone is interested in membership - there is no hazing involved.:D
Initiation into the Knights of Edisto is a simple "dubbing".....and membership in the Official D. H. Hill Fan Club requires no especial mathematical problem solving skills. :giggle:
 

Jamieva

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Feb 7, 2006
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Midlothian, VA
There was an unfortunate rivalry between Micah Jenkins and his fellow South Carolinian Evander Law as to who should command Hood's Division (Jenkins had seniority but Law had been with the division a lot longer) and that created a poisonous atmosphere in Hood's division to which Jenkins' Brigade was assigned to after Gettysburg.


Yeah it's a complicated one but much of it had to do with Longstreet making staff maneuvers that would mean the division command had to be given to Jenkins. Jenkins performed poorly in the Knoxville campaign and blamed Law for much of it. When they got back to VA, the issue of division command was resolved for good as Field, who was senior to both of them, was placed in charge of the division
 

Yankeedave

1st Lieutenant
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Dec 3, 2012
Location
Colorado
Something was off in Longstreet's command after Chickumauga. I wonder how much of it was due to angling for the possibility that Longstreet would take command from Bragg.
Although Lee might have been willing to lose Longstreet, Lee would have wanted to keep the majority of the corps I.e. the numbers. So who will lead them...nothing but conjecture on my part. Plus Longstreet got out marched by Burnsides of all people. Didn't help get Pete promoted.
 

luinrina

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Germany
I first read about Micah Jenkins in Freeman's Lee's Lieutenants Vol. I. Jenkins was described as a good officer and one of great promise. In his Gettysburg Sears wrote that Lee was angry at D.H. Hill for not returning his best brigades before the ANV headed north, among them Micah Jenkins'. Sounds like he really was a good officer. That makes me want to learn more about him. :smile: I'll have to check out @AUG 's threads.

The image of him, pale with sickness, throwing his arm around Moxley Sorrel saying, "We shall smash them now" is a very poignant one.
It really is a great image. Would you mind sharing where you read about that?
 

OldReliable1862

Sergeant
Joined
Jul 2, 2017
Location
Georgia
I first read about Micah Jenkins in Freeman's Lee's Lieutenants Vol. I. Jenkins was described as a good officer and one of great promise. In his Gettysburg Sears wrote that Lee was angry at D.H. Hill for not returning his best brigades before the ANV headed north, among them Micah Jenkins'. Sounds like he really was a good officer. That makes me want to learn more about him. :smile: I'll have to check out @AUG 's threads.


It really is a great image. Would you mind sharing where you read about that?
I read about it in Gordon Rhea's book on the Battle of the Wilderness. I haven't read all of it, but what I have read is very good. I haven't been able to find a copy of of Lee's Lieutenants that wasn't for some ridiculous price. Could you tell me where did you find yours?
 

luinrina

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I read about it in Gordon Rhea's book on the Battle of the Wilderness. I haven't read all of it, but what I have read is very good. I haven't been able to find a copy of of Lee's Lieutenants that wasn't for some ridiculous price. Could you tell me where did you find yours?
Great! I just ordered Rhea's Wilderness. :smile:

Well, I got Lee's Lieutenants on Amazon - for a riddiculous price. :whistling: But it was a hard decision; I thought about getting them or not for that price for a good three months before I went ahead and purchased them. I only read the first volume so far, but I really liked it. Freeman really was a great writer. For me it's worth the money.
 

John Winn

Major
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Location
State of Jefferson
My great grandmother's first husband was in the Palmetto Sharpshooters and was killed four months after they were married. Thus, I've had an interest in that regiment and in Jenkins. Just after the war grandma re-married in Charleston to my Baptist preacher great grandpa. So, while the death of husband #1 is largely why I'm here today I still feel some familial connection to Jenkins and the Sharpshooters. It's part of my South Carolina roots. And from what I've read, I also think Jenkins was a fine man.

So, I humbly submit myself to the service of the Knights of Edisto if I am deemed worthy.
 
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