★  Brannan, John Milton

John Milton Brannan
:us34stars:
Brannan.jpg


Born: July 1, 1819

Birthplace: Washington, D.C.

Father: John Brannan 1800 – 1833

Mother: Sarah Salome Myers 1792 – 1875

1st Wife:
Clarissa Elizabeth Crane 1829 – 1858

2nd Wife: Evelyn West Way 1836 - 1900

Education:

1841: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (23rd in class)​

Occupation before War:

Messenger in the United States House of Representatives​
1841 – 1842: Brevet 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1841 – 1842: Served on Northern Frontier at Plattsburg, New York​
1842 – 1847: 2nd Lt. United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1842 – 1843: Garrison Duty at Hancock Barracks​
1843 – 1845: Garrison Duty at Fort Adams, Rhode Island​
1845 – 1846: Garrison Duty at Fort Wood, Louisiana​
1846: Recruiter for United States Army​
1847: Brevetted Captain for Gallantry in two battles​
1847: Wounded in the assault at Mexico City, Mexico​
1847 – 1854: Adjutant of United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1848 – 1850: Garrison Duty at Fort Columbus, New York​
1854 – 1863: Captain, United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1857 – 1858: Served against the Seminoles in Florida​
1858 – 1861: Garrison Duty at Key West, Florida​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1866: Brigadier General, Union Army Volunteers​
1861: Served in the Defenses of Washington, D.C.​
1862: Union Army Commander of Department of Key West, Florida​
1862 – 1863: Union Army Commander of Department of the South​
1862: Union Army Commander of Port Royal, South Carolina​
1862: Union Army Commander, Expedition to St. John’s River, Florida​
1862: Brevetted Lt. Colonel for Gallantry at Battle of Jacksonville​
1862: Served in the fighting at Pocotaligo, South Carolina​
1863: Served in the Battle of Hoover’s Gap, Tennessee​
1863: Served in the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia​
1863 – 1877: Major of United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1863: Brevetted Colonel for Gallantry Battle of Chickamauga​
1863 – 1865: Chief of Artillery for Army of the Cumberland​
1863 – 1864: Chief of Artillery at Chattanooga, Tennessee​
1863: Served in the Battle of Missionary Ridge, Tennessee​
1863 – 1864: Reorganizer of Artillery for Army of the Cumberland​
1864: Served in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia​
1864: Served in the Siege of Atlanta, Georgia​
1864: Served in the Surrender of Atlanta, Georgia​
1864 – 1865: Inspection tour of Department of Cumberland​
1865: Brevetted Major General of Union Army, Volunteers​
1865: Brevetted Brig. General for Gallantry at Battle of Atlanta​
1865: Brevetted Major General for his service in the War​
1865: Union Army Commander of District of Savannah, Georgia​
1865 – 1866: Temporary Commander of the Department of Georgia​
1866: Mustered out of the Union Army on May 31st

Occupation after War:

1863 – 1877: Major of United States Army, 1st Artillery​
1866: Declined Lt. Colonel, United States Army, 22nd Infantry Regiment​
1866 – 1870: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Trumbull, Connecticut​
1870 – 1872: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Wadsworth, New York​
1874 – 1876: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Trumbull, Connecticut​
1876: Union Army Commander in Edgefield, South Carolina​
1876: Union Army Commander in Tallahassee, Florida​
1876 – 1880: U.S. Army Commander of Fort Trumbull, Connecticut​
1877: Lt. Colonel, United States Army, 4th Artillery​
1877 – 1881: Lt. Colonel, United States Army, 4th Artillery​
1877: Served in the railroad disturbances in Philadelphia PA.​
1881 – 1882: Colonel, United States Army 4th Artillery​
1882: Retired from United States Army on April 19th
1882 – 1892: Lived Retired in New York City, New York​

Died: December 16, 1892

Place of Death: New York City, New York

Cause of Death: Neuralgia of the heart

Age at time of Death: 73 years old

Burial Place: U.S. Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, New York
 
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Luke Freet

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Location
Palm Coast, Florida
Bump for Chickamauga.
Brannan was tasked by Thomas on the 19th to push towards Reed's Bridge to cut off the lone Confederate brigade Colonel McCook spoke of being isolated on the west side of the creek. This unwittingly kicked off the bloodletting of that day. His division, on orders from senior division commander Reynolds, made the far right flank of the Union line on the 20th, and was caught in the edge of Longstreet's assault; however, his command reformed on Horseshoe Ridge and fought with Steedman to hold off the numerous Confederate assaults on that position, allowing Thomas to hold and withdraw by nightfall. After the battle, he was reassigned to command the Army of the Cumberland's artillery.
 
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