Miniatures Books used for painting miniatures.

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Aug 25, 2012
Some of the early books for knowing what the miniatures should look like were on the sad side. When this book came out it was a detailed work for a low cost.

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Chris Warner did a fine job covering Union infantry uniforms in his 1977 book. I still like the color art work of uniforms in this book.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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This book came out in 1970 was popular in hobby shops in the early 1970s.
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Although the color uniforms are not well done, there are 15 color Confederate uniforms and 21 Union uniforms and I have no doubt many figurine painters used this work to paint figurines and miniatures. The cost was low and it was good enough for miniatures and figurines. There was a similar cavalry book.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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10 full color Union cavalry uniforms and 15 Confederate uniforms as well as many black and white uniform illustrations. All for a cost young model painters and miniature painters could afford.

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Kurt G

Sergeant Major
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May 23, 2018
I had the Almark books . The next advance was the Osprey books . The Iron Brigade book had a copyright of 1971 and the Montcalm's Army was 1973 . The earliest book to actually show you how to paint was "The Model Soldier Guide" by Imrie and Risley . My copy is dated 1965 .

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major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Joined
Aug 25, 2012
In 1975 Osprey added these books.
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Osprey did up the quality of their Men-at-Arms books and these are not bad for 1975, but still are not up to the standards of most Osprey books of the 1980s. Still they are a step up from the Osprey Iron Brigade book.
 

Kurt G

Sergeant Major
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May 23, 2018
Probably a couple steps above the Iron Brigade one . The newer ones do have much better illustrators and more accurate uniform information , but the early Osprey books were probably the easiest to find and they were a lot cheaper than such books as the series "Military Uniforms in America" by the Company of Military Historians . I did buy their book on the era of the American Revolution which is still useful .
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Aug 25, 2012
Probably a couple steps above the Iron Brigade one . The newer ones do have much better illustrators and more accurate uniform information , but the early Osprey books were probably the easiest to find and they were a lot cheaper than such books as the series "Military Uniforms in America" by the Company of Military Historians . I did buy their book on the era of the American Revolution which is still useful .

I have all four Company of Military Historians books. The Long Endure: The Civil War Era is good for Civil War uniforms. I also have most of the 150 plus Civil Ware era Uniforms in American uniform plates from the Company of Military Historians.
 

7thWisconsin

Sergeant Major
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Nov 21, 2014
That early Iron Brigade one is aweful!!! I can't begin to know where to start correcting it! I had the AoP and ANV books too. They're inteesting because a distinct European flavor creeps into the text. They had significant problems, but I used them as a guide for years. Even used the OOBs to make a couple wargame armies.
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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From 1971 so is from the same era as the Iron Brigade book.
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An interesting subject but in the same style as the Iron Brigade book. Not the best art work and has some mistakes. Still I liked the book when I bought it in the 1970s. So OK I was easily impressed in the early 1970s I was in my early 20s.
 

7thWisconsin

Sergeant Major
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Nov 21, 2014
LOL - yep, if I remember Osprey's history, those were their first two titles. I don't know which one is actually worse! Flip a coin. But there weren't very many sources out there like this back then. I remember using Frederick Ray's uniform plates (the ones they sell in Gettysburg gift shops) as painting guides. Then there is that Phillip Haythornewaite book... don't get me started on that mess!
 

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