Boler's Inn in Union, Mississippi

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39th MS. Rebel

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Joined
Jan 23, 2019
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58
Location
Belden, MS.
Boler's Inn
Union, MS




Holding an important place in the history of Union, MS is the former stagecoach inn first owned by Neshoba/Newton County pioneer Wesley Boler. Mr. Boler hired his son-in-law, Norfleet Staton, to build a new two story house in 1856. The construction can be dated by a letter Norfleet Staton wrote to his father Ennis in North Carolina on August 10, 1856. A transcript of that letter was sent to me by the late Polly Staton Barrick, who was also in possession of the tools her g-grandfather used to build the house. Staton wrote, "I am bilding a house for my old father law 46 by 38, 2 story high. I think I will make 150 or 200 dollars by crismas father."


The Civil War came to Boler's Inn in the form of General Sherman, who quartered his men around the building. According to local legend, Sherman didn't burn the town of Union because of it's name. Little did Sherman know that Wesley Boler's sons and son-in-law were away fighting for the Confederacy. Boler's third son James was killed in the Siege of Vicksburg. Another long told local story indicates a wounded pay master spent the night in the inn. Before morning he died, having buried his payroll during the night. Treasure hunters have searched in vain for that long hidden payroll during the many years that have now passed.

Sources- http://www.carolshouse.com/bolersinn/
http://www.nchgs.org/html/boler_inn.html

bolersinnnov1907.jpg
 
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39th MS. Rebel

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Jan 23, 2019
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Location
Belden, MS.
My wife and I were given a personal tour last year and was in the room and saw up close the bed he slept in.:cool:
The room he stayed by looking at the above picture is located on the second floor, far left door.
The floors in that room are original.
 
Joined
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I believe this was when Sherman was on his return to Vicksburg after his march to Meridian destroying the RR and everything else. This was his warm up for his march to the sea in 1864.
Sherman stayed the night at the Boler Inn at Union, Mississippi on 21 Feb 1864, the day after he left Meridian in complete ruins while marching back to Vicksburg.

Saturday, 20 Feb 1864:

Maj. General William T. Sherman and his Army left Meridian, Ms. in a smoldering ruin at daybreak. His Army marched past Marion and then north from there for 13 miles where they crossed Ball Creek and made camp for the night at the Holliday Plantation. Earlier in the day Sherman had sent a small detachment of Cavalry to destroy the depot`s and tear up the rail-road at Cuba Station, York Station and Livingston Station in Alabama just across the Mississippi border and then Lauderdale Springs Station and Daleville, Ms. above Meridian near Marion.

Two days before that on 18 Feb 1864, Maj. General Stephen D. Lee and Brig. General William "Red Fox" Jackson, accompanied by the Cavalry Brigades of Brig. General Samuel Wragg Ferguson, Brig. General William Wirt Adams, Brig. General Lawrence Sullivan Ross and Col. Peter B. Starke who opposed Sherman`s Army from the Big Black River west of Jackson all the way to Meridian, were all ordered north to assist Maj. General Nathan Bedford Forrest in his fight against Brig. General William Sooy Smith`s 7,000 man Cavalry Division up in the Mississippi Delta at Okolona. Col. Robert Perrin and his Cavalry Company were left at Cuba, Alabama covering the road to Livingston keeping an eye on Sherman as he continued his destruction in and around Meridian, leaving only the 23 Scouts of Lt. Addison Harvey to follow and impede the whole of Maj. General W. T. Sherman`s 23,000 man Army west back to Vicksburg. It was Harvey`s Scouts alone that harassed Sherman`s Army from Meridian until he reached Union, Mississippi the following afternoon.

Sunday, February 21, 1864:

At daybreak Maj. General William T. Sherman`s men broke camp and left the Holliday Plantation continuing their march west back to Vicksburg. At this time Lt. General Leonidas Polk`s Confederate Infantry and Artillery (Maj. General`s William W. Loring and Samuel G. French) were continuing their general retreat farther eastward into Alabama towards Demopolis. While Maj. General Stephen D. Lee`s whole Confederate Cavalry, who had been opposing Sherman`s march to Meridian, were then north of him a considerable distance between Starkeville and Okolona, having been ordered to break off the fight against Sherman at Meridian and sent to join the fight at Okolona against Brig. General William Sooy Smith`s Cavalry Division. Therefore, nothing stood in Maj. General Sherman`s way on his march from Meridian back to Vicksburg, except Harvey`s Scouts which only numbered a total of 23 Confederates and they could do little more than attack the foraging parties, flanks and rear guard of Sherman`s Army all day from the time that they left Holliday`s Plantation, until they crossed to the west bank of the Okatibee River and passed through the Old Choctaw Village there known as "Muckalusha old Town" and then 9 miles west of there all the way to the small town of Union where Harvey`s Scouts were finally chased off of Maj. General William T. Sherman`s train, which is where they made camp for the night with Sherman himself sleeping at the Boler Travel Inn for the night. At that time Lt. Addison Harvey split his forces of 23 men and sent 15 of them to scout ahead the route back to Vicksburg and remained with the other 7 of his men to continue skirmishing with Sherman`s men on their march west.

As a note of interest as Sherman was entering into the town of Union on this day and had successfully chased off Lt. Addison Harvey`s Scouts, who had been harassing him since they left Meridian the day before, he ran into Capt. John Quincy Rayburn (1834 - 1864) and his small Company of Cavalry (State Troops) who were protecting his hometown of Union from the invading Federals. Immediately fighting ensued with the advance of Sherman`s Army, that being Col. Edward Winslow and his 4th Iowa Cavalry, which quickly resulted in Capt. John Quincy Rayburn being shot and killed, by too reckless exposure of himself, and left leaning up against a fence post just inside the town limits of Union.

The sword which was carried into battle on that day by Capt. John Quincy Rayburn was eventually passed down to one of his descendant`s, Mrs. Lorene Conner. Years later at the time of her death in Hattiesburg, Mrs. Conner told her version involving John's death. She stated that: "With the enemy close at hand, John stood upon a fence post near the road on which the Yankee soldiers would pass and was caught in the forehead by a Yankee bullet. He died a few hours later in a nearby farmhouse. This farm house has been identified by others as the John Paul Quattlebaum property".

Sherman spent the night at the Boler Inn and continued his march back to Vicksburg the next morning eventually arriving there on 5 Mar 1864 after spending roughly 5 days and nights skirmishing and fighting around Canton, Ms. against Maj. General Stephen D. Lee`s Cavalry, who had returned from assisting Maj. General Nathan Bedford Forest up in the Mississippi Delta at Okolona and they caught up with Sherman`s Army as they were re-crossing the Pearl River where and when they picked up the fight again... And kept up the fight until Sherman`s Army re-crossed the Big Black River on 4 Mar 1864 and arrived back to Vicksburg the following day of 5 Mar 1864.
 
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