Black Votes: Frederick Douglass Meets With Andrew Johnson 2/7/1866 Reconstruction150


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Rebforever

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#47
Here is more racism.

"In 1866, Douglass led a Black delegation to the White House to meet with President Andrew Johnson and advocate for Black suffrage. The president was opposed to such an idea, and the meeting ended in controversy. When Black men did finally receive the vote with the ratification of the 15th Amendment in 1870, Douglass' longtime support of female suffrage became subject to some controversy. Many women in the movement blamed him and other Black leaders for sacrificing their female comrades for the sake of gaining the franchise themselves."

https://www.shmoop.com/reconstruction/frederick-douglass.html
 

Pat Young

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#49
Here is more racism.

"In 1866, Douglass led a Black delegation to the White House to meet with President Andrew Johnson and advocate for Black suffrage. The president was opposed to such an idea, and the meeting ended in controversy. When Black men did finally receive the vote with the ratification of the 15th Amendment in 1870, Douglass' longtime support of female suffrage became subject to some controversy. Many women in the movement blamed him and other Black leaders for sacrificing their female comrades for the sake of gaining the franchise themselves."

https://www.shmoop.com/reconstruction/frederick-douglass.html
Help me out, and God forgive me for asking, but in that passage are you highlighting Johnson's racism?
 
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#50
I'm not sure who picked him, but I think Lincoln would have had a say in the matter.
Well Johnson was picked to appeal to the South. Just like the Buchanan / Breckinridge ticket. Breckinridge was supposed to appeal to the Southern voter.
I'm not sure who picked him, but I think Lincoln would have had a say in the matter.
I know that for instance Buchanan didn’t pick Breckinridge because he was nominated at the Democrat convention of 1856 and it was hoped he would garner Southern support. My thought is that Johnson was selected with the same idea in mind. Republicans were going to balance their ticket by nominating Johnson. As a side note, Both Johnson and Buchanan were strong Constitutionalists so they also have that in common. It wouldn’t be a stretch to accuse any Constitutionalist including Lincoln at the time as being in support of states rights or slavery in non-rebelling states. @matthew mckeon
 
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CSA Today

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#51
Well Johnson was picked to appeal to the South. Just like the Buchanan / Breckinridge ticket. Breckinridge was supposed to appeal to the Southern voter.

I know that for instance Buchanan didn’t pick Breckinridge because he was nominated at the Democrat convention of 1856 and it was hoped he would garner Southern support. My thought is that Johnson was selected with the same idea in mind. Republicans were going to balance their ticket by nominating Johnson. As a side note, Both Johnson and Buchanan were strong Constitutionalists so they also have that in common. It wouldn’t be a stretch to accuse any Constitutionalist including Lincoln at the time as being in support of states rights or slavery in non-rebelling states. @matthew mckeon
Poor ol' Andy tried to be something for everybody and ended up being despised by both Northerners and Southerners. :thumbsdown:
 

Bee

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#52
. It wouldn’t be a stretch to accuse any Constitutionalist including Lincoln at the time as being in support of states rights or slavery in non-rebelling states. @matthew mckeon
Lincoln laboured under his Constitutional duties, and his personal convictions (letter to Horace Greeley 1862)

have here stated my purpose according to my view of official duty; and I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men every where could be free.
http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/greeley.htm
 
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#55
Bee was right to point out Lincolns desire to see all men Free. I think there lies the rub. It is too easy to cry racist. Those who favored states rights in order to deny blacks equal rights were afraid of the unknown. I try not to generalize, poorer people tend to help each other. A morsel or a meal would be welcomed even if it came from a black hand, Some knew that to recognize blacks as citizens would push the problem past skin color into the realm of economics. It is a distraction if the poor hate the poor because of skin color the rich or well to do continue on in their greedy ways. It is only fair that every one have an equal opportunity to succeed or fail.
 
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#58
Johnson responded that giving the black man the vote would ignite a race war:
I think everyone forgets that there was a race war in the south in the 1870's. It was called the Mississippi Plan. Where white southern militias to suppress the freedmen vote with violence. It was not called a race war because the freedmen did not retaliate. I think we have to score one President A. Johnson...

ohnson said that only the white legislatures of the Southern states could properly grant blacks the vote.
Historically, who was given the right to vote was a state function, not a federal function. What Douglass and the Radicals where proposing was going against 70 plus years of tradition and case law. I think we have to score one for President A. Johnson for following historical precedent in voting.
 
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#59
Johnson argued that non-slaveholding whites in the South had come to hate blacks because, as slaves. they had given planters a monopoly on power in the South. He said that blacks had contempt for poor whites, a charge Douglass denied. Then Johnson said that blacks status had improved greatly through Emancipation while Southern whites had seen their situation decline:
President A. Johnson did not like the Plantation southern class...

But as a self-made man, he also disliked the planter class of Southern elites (who considered him tactless)

Here... His support has always been from the poor white farmers and mountain people. He was an enemy of the Plantation class.

He then became a spokesman for the farmers and mountaineers against the wealthier, but fewer, planter elite families that had held political control in Tennessee.

He lived with the non-slave holding white southerners so he understood what they thought of slavery and of Plantation class. Here a look at his life..

Born in Raleigh, North Carolina to Jacob and Mary McDonough Johnson, his father died when he was three years old, leaving the family in poverty. His mother then took in work spinning and weaving to support the family, and later remarried. He received no formal education and when he was a young teenager, his mother bound him as an apprentice tailor in Laurens, South Carolina. Somehow, the boy taught himself how to read and write. At about the age of 16, he left the apprenticeship and ran away with his brother to Greeneville, Tennessee, where he found work as a tailor. Later, he opened his own tailor shop and married Eliza McCardle in 1827 at the age of 19 and the two would have eventually have five children. His wife, Eliza taught him arithmetic up to basic algebra and tutored him to improve his literacy and writing skills.

I think President A Johnson gets a draw. A question what did the poor southern whites who stayed loyal to the union receive for their efforts?

https://www.legendsofamerica.com/ah-andrewjohnson/
 
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#60
Johnson was a jerk.
You know Johnson tried to honor Lincoln reconstruction wishes...

Northern Radicals were angry that he followed Lincoln's moderate course of Reconstruction. Still other Northerners who had supported Lincoln now wanted to see the South punished for his murder and thought Johnson was too sympathetic to the South.

But Johnson did not intend to punish the South. And while he did oversee the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution outlawing slavery (a process Lincoln had started), Johnson also believed on principle that each state had the right to decide the best course of Reconstruction for itself. He appointed governors to help the states take the steps outlined by Lincoln for readmission to the Union,

Johnson's paternalistic attitude toward the freedmen kept him from opposing these measures with presidential authority.

Johnson pardoned Confederate prisoners and allowed former officials and soldiers to take part in the new state governments (as Lincoln intended to do). As soon as they took the oath of allegiance, all of their property, except for slaves, was returned to them (including confiscated land that had been promised to freedmen), and they regained their full legal rights. Before long, even the Freedmen's Bureau was being restricted at the local level, keeping former slaves dependent on the plantations that used to own them.

I think President A Johnson scores a point again for trying to follow Lincoln plan...

https://study.com/academy/lesson/pr...to-continue-lincolns-reconstruction-plan.html

https://prezi.com/f-l7y4nr-yd9/diag...the-radical-republicans-reconstruction-plans/


Andrew Johnson was a horrible racist, by the standards of the time
I think the word "horrible" is a little over the top...
 



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