Brass Napoleon Award Black Southerners and the Confederate Cause--What the newspapers said: 1861-1865

19thGeorgia

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Wasn't there a unit, IIRC the 1st Louisiana Native Guards, a free Black regiment, who offered their services to the Confederacy early in, or before the conflict, But was turned down? It seems I read something of that nature.

Respectfully,
William

One Nation
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Yes, I've seen these statements too, but they're primarily on message boards and blogs with no documentation.
 

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unionblue

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Yes, I've seen these statements too, but they're primarily on message boards and blogs with no documentation.
You may have seen such, @19thGeorgia , but it has been confirmed in numerous books and sources that they offered their services to the Confederacy, but were rejected.

It's a proven fact.
 
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There was a Prince Albert in Company D, 95th Alabama Militia of Mobile. Not sure that it's the same person in the article as there may have been a white man with the same name. The 95th was called out briefly in the Spring of 1862. CSR shows Albert serving only four days which was typical for the rest of the company.

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Interesting. I don't know how common a name like Prince Albert was, but surely there can't be that many people with that name. That might well be him.
 

unionblue

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What documents do they reference?
So, you, yourself, have never researched the 1st LA. Native Guard? Never done a google search. Never typed the unit name into a search engine? Just to be sure your assumptions about it's employment are correct?

Why not ask @Andersonh1 about the unit history?

In the meantime, I will get you some sources you might find useful.

Unionblue
 
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19thGeorgia

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So, you, yourself, have never researched the 1st LA. Native Guard? Never done a google search. Never typed the unit name into a search engine? Just to be sure your assumptions about it's employment are correct?
I would just like to see the document where they offer their services to the CSA and are rejected by the Secretary of War.
 

unionblue

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Yes, I've seen these statements too, but they're primarily on message boards and blogs with no documentation.
I would just like to see the document where they offer their services to the CSA and are rejected by the Secretary of War.
I can't recall seeing any indication that the 1st Louisiana ever offered their services to the CS government. They made the offer directly to the governor of Louisiana, as the commander in chief of the state's militia.

There was a Creole unit in Mobile, Alabama that Dabney Maury wanted to enlist in the regular CS army in 1863 as artillerists, who were rejected by the CS secretary of war "unless they could pass as white." Perhaps that's the group UnionBlue is thinking of who applied and were rejected.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,​
Mobile, Ala., November 7, 1863.​
General SAMUEL COOPER,​
Adjt. and Insp. Gen., C.S. Army, Richmond, Va.:​
GENERAL: I again call your attention to my request to accept into the Confederate service the company of creoles of Mobile, because I think that perhaps the War Department is not exactly informed about the people I have reference to. When Spain ceded this territory to the United States in 1803, the creoles were guaranteed all the immunities and privileges of the citizens of the United States, and have continued to enjoy them up to this time. They have, many of them, negro blood in the degree which disqualifies other persons of negro race from the rights of citizens, but they do not stand here on the footing of negroes. They are very anxious to enter the Confederate service, and I propose to make heavy artillerists of them, for which they will be admirably qualified. Please let me hear at your earliest convenience if I may have them enrolled in a company, or in companies if I can find enough of them to make more than one company.​
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,​
DABNEY H. MAURY,​
Major-General.​
[First indorsement.]​
ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,​
November 20, 1863.​
Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. An application to have a company of creoles at Mobile accepted into Confederate service.​
By order, &c.:​
JOHN W. RIELY,​
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.​
[Second indorsement.]​
[NOVEMBER] 24, 1863.​
Our position with the North and before the world will not allow the employment as armed soldiers of negroes. If these creoles can be naturally and properly discriminated from negroes, the authority may be considered as conferred; otherwise not, unless you can enlist them as "navvies" (to use the English term) or for subordinate working purposes.​
J. A. S.,​
Secretary.​
=====​
I​
 
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A different war--- but a Haitian regiment acted as a rear guard to prevent a disaster when the American Army pulled out of Savannah during the revolutionary war----And the British did not give it back for a year after the war. Everyone likes Savannah. One of you "Pro" historians check me on this please---I am traveling here on memory.
 

19thGeorgia

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I can't recall seeing any indication that the 1st Louisiana ever offered their services to the CS government. They made the offer directly to the governor of Louisiana, as the commander in chief of the state's militia.

There was a Creole unit in Mobile, Alabama that Dabney Maury wanted to enlist in the regular CS army in 1863 as artillerists, who were rejected by the CS secretary of war "unless they could pass as white." Perhaps that's the group UnionBlue is thinking of who applied and were rejected.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,​
Mobile, Ala., November 7, 1863.​
General SAMUEL COOPER,​
Adjt. and Insp. Gen., C.S. Army, Richmond, Va.:​
GENERAL: I again call your attention to my request to accept into the Confederate service the company of creoles of Mobile, because I think that perhaps the War Department is not exactly informed about the people I have reference to. When Spain ceded this territory to the United States in 1803, the creoles were guaranteed all the immunities and privileges of the citizens of the United States, and have continued to enjoy them up to this time. They have, many of them, negro blood in the degree which disqualifies other persons of negro race from the rights of citizens, but they do not stand here on the footing of negroes. They are very anxious to enter the Confederate service, and I propose to make heavy artillerists of them, for which they will be admirably qualified. Please let me hear at your earliest convenience if I may have them enrolled in a company, or in companies if I can find enough of them to make more than one company.​
I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,​
DABNEY H. MAURY,​
Major-General.​
[First indorsement.]​
ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,​
November 20, 1863.​
Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. An application to have a company of creoles at Mobile accepted into Confederate service.​
By order, &c.:​
JOHN W. RIELY,​
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.​
[Second indorsement.]​
[NOVEMBER] 24, 1863.​
Our position with the North and before the world will not allow the employment as armed soldiers of negroes. If these creoles can be naturally and properly discriminated from negroes, the authority may be considered as conferred; otherwise not, unless you can enlist them as "navvies" (to use the English term) or for subordinate working purposes.​
J. A. S.,​
Secretary.​
=====​
I​
Yes, they never volunteered to go to Virginia or Tennessee. They only joined up to defend Louisiana and more specifically New Orleans. And when the bell rang, they did what they were called on to do.

Strange - how did those rolls end up in the Richmond CS Archives? :smile coffee:
 
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You may have seen such, @19thGeorgia , but it has been confirmed in numerous books and sources that they offered their services to the Confederacy, but were rejected.

It's a proven fact.

UB,

I thought that I had read that somewhere in my many readings, and they were a Black unit, right?

Respectfully,

William

One Nation
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Confed-American Flag - Thumbnail.jpg
 
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Jordan Noble gets mentioned quite often when the New Orleans troops appear in the newspapers.

https://www.nps.gov/people/jordan-noble.htm

Noble maintained his military connections after the War of 1812 was over, participating in the 1836 Seminole War in Florida, in the Mexican War, and with Confederate and Union forces during the Civil War. After his fighting days had passed, Noble held tightly onto his position within the New Orleans free black community and onto his military legacy as the drummer boy of the Battle of New Orleans.​
“Old Jordan” became a fixture in New Orleans, especially in nostalgic commemorations of the “Glorious Eighth.” In an 1880 certificate from the Grand Army of the Republic, Joseph A. Mower proclaimed Noble to be a “worthy, upright and honest man who has done good service."​

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The Savannah Republican. (Savannah, Ga.) 1858-1865, November 21, 1862
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Enlist: "enroll or be enrolled in the armed services". If black men enlisted in the Confederate army as cooks, are they Confederates? Do they have to buy into the cause to cook for the men fighting for the cause? The terminology used here raises all sorts of interesting questions.

Daily Morning News. (Savannah, Ga.) 1850-1864, October 11, 1862
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Gov. Brown of Georgia was clearly not in favor of arming the slaves. It is interesting to me that he expresses this view:

"....we cannot expect them to perform deeds of heroism when fighting to continue the enslavement of their wives and children, and it is not reasonable to demand it of them." It's a surprisingly honest admission. Brown clearly is in favor of slaves remaining slaves, but is also in favor of "one or the other"... either they're slaves or they're free. Trying to give some freedom while the rest remain enslaved is an unreasonable approach.

His views are very similar to Howell Cobb. To arm the slave is to admit he is capable and is deserving of freedom. It was to up-end the established social order.

The Hillsdale standard. (Hillsdale, Mich.) 1851-1909, March 21, 1865
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